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Medicare Cuts

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NEWS
November 25, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
President-elect George Bush may seek to reduce the federal budget deficit by trimming Medicare costs, the Washington Post reported today. It quoted some unidentified Bush advisers and budget experts as saying the new administration would support substantial cuts of between $3.5 billion and $5 billion for fiscal 1990. The Post quoted the experts as saying any suggested cuts, at least initially, were not likely to involve drastic changes in the $80 billion program. Initial cuts would, more likely, be based on the Reagan administration's budget proposal for fiscal 1990 being prepared for submission to Congress, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Saying the government cannot sustain another decade of runaway health-care costs, the Democratic chairman of the House Budget Committee called yesterday for deep cuts in the Medicare program. The proposal, a sharp break from standard Democratic approaches, was part of a long-range plan by Rep. Leon E. Panetta (D., Calif.) to reduce the deficit by cutting $1 trillion in spending by the turn of the century. In an unusual twist for a Democrat, Panetta stressed spending cuts instead of tax increases as the primary way to reduce the deficit.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospital administrators have no problem identifying the problem, its cause and the source. They are: losses; Medicare and Medicaid, and Washington and Harrisburg. After Frankford Hospital recorded a million-dollar net loss last year, John Neff, Frankford's president, decided he had to do what he could to change things. So last week he went to Washington. Armed with petitions signed by a long list of hospital users, Neff made the office of Rep. Robert A. Borski Jr. his first stop.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angry and worried about proposed congressional cuts in the Medicare health program for senior citizens, about 200 older Philadelphians gathered in Center City yesterday to protest and warn local senators and representatives of dire consequences if they voted against senior interests. "We want our people to bombard their representatives like they have never done before - to call them and call again to let them know we are opposed to any cuts in Medicare," said Sarah Philyaw, president of the Action Alliance of Senior Citizens of Greater Philadelphia, the group that organized the meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 2002
The article "Temple Health System to close nursing home" (Inquirer, Aug. 14) is illustrative of the rapidly growing pressures placed upon long-term care facilities. Joseph W. Marshall 3d, chairman and CEO of the Temple University Health System, pointed out that "tremendous financial and staffing challenges" are primarily responsible for the closure. He's right: The financial squeeze placed upon nursing homes by the combination of Medicaid underfunding and threatened federal cuts to Medicare is wreaking havoc on facilities already coping with a national nurse staffing crisis and the growing demand for skilled nursing care.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Trying to prevent a raid on health-care programs in coming budget talks, a think tank close to the White House released a plan Wednesday for significant savings, mostly from Medicare. Medicaid and the new health-care law are largely spared from cuts in the blueprint from the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress. Instead, it targets Medicare service providers, from the pharmaceutical industry to hospitals and nursing homes. Higher-income Medicare recipients also would face increased monthly premiums for outpatient and prescription coverage.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a sunny August day nearly two years ago, President Clinton signed into law the first balanced budget in a generation. Even as politicians in Washington celebrated an end to 28 years of deficits, few looked beyond the bottom line. More than half of the spending cuts in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 - $112 billion over five years - were to come from the Medicare program. Reduced payments for hospital and nursing-home stays and for physical rehabilitation, among other changes, had such immediate impact that in March the Congressional Budget Office increased its five-year estimate of Medicare savings to $197 billion.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Under the proposed Medicare cuts, a millionaire retiree and an elderly widow with an annual income of $8,000 would have to pay the same amount - more than $300 a year - in additional health-care expenses by 1995. "It's clearly inequitable to charge all Medicare beneficiaries the same increase. It puts the burden on those least able to bear it," said Fernando Torres-Gil, a gerontology professor at the University of Southern California. "God forbid if the near-poor elderly have to go into the hospital," said Thomas Burke, former chief of staff of the Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
February 28, 1993
In laying out its deficit-reduction plan, the Clinton administration rattled older Americans with talk of cutting Medicare spending. It promised no benefits would be cut. But old folks aren't dumb: They know that if reimbursements to doctors and hospitals are reduced, cuts in care - no matter what the law mandates - are likely to follow. Last week, the President's health reformers were busy making up. While they might curtail some Medicare money in the short-haul, they said, they're actively considering ways to finance two of the top concerns of the elderly - long-term care and prescription drugs.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No more than 10 days ago, New Jersey Democrats were stuck in neutral, seemingly resigned to a lackluster showing in next Tuesday's state Assembly elections. Then Newt Gingrich began making headlines again. Only this time, the Republican House speaker's talk of a federal budget revolution was no longer abstract. The GOP-controlled Congress was actually voting to slash billions of dollars from the Medicare and Medicaid programs, spreading alarm among the poor, the elderly and others who could take their anger to the ballot box. For Democrats everywhere, that is good news.
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NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a region that counts medicine and medical research among its strengths, a new condition has been detected: fear of sequestration. Hospitals and health researchers are warning that sequestration, the automatic federal funding cuts that are due to begin Friday, could deal devastating blows in the Philadelphia area. Sequestration could cut Medicare payments by 2 percent, which would cost hospitals in Southeastern Pennsylvania at least $50 million a year, according to the Delaware Valley Healthcare Council, a lobbying group for hospitals.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Sometimes, the veneer of reasonableness is all that's needed to help bad ideas gain a foothold. But don't be fooled by appearances if two of the worst - cutting Social Security's cost-of-living increases and raising the Medicare eligibility age - manage to creep into a last-minute budget deal in the coming weeks. Both were dangled by the Obama administration in mid-2011, when House Republicans were threatening to blow up the nation's finances by refusing to raise the nation's debt ceiling - a standoff that ended with real damage to the economy and the stopgap agreement that's now expiring.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Trying to prevent a raid on health-care programs in coming budget talks, a think tank close to the White House released a plan Wednesday for significant savings, mostly from Medicare. Medicaid and the new health-care law are largely spared from cuts in the blueprint from the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress. Instead, it targets Medicare service providers, from the pharmaceutical industry to hospitals and nursing homes. Higher-income Medicare recipients also would face increased monthly premiums for outpatient and prescription coverage.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
By E. Thomas McClanahan One of the most important exchanges during last week's presidential debate dealt with Medicare, where President Obama was on thin ice from the beginning. Obama said the $716 billion he's yanking from Medicare and shifting to Obamacare represents savings from "no longer overpaying insurance companies" and "making sure we weren't overpaying providers. " Romney fired back, saying - accurately - that those aren't just clawbacks of overpayments; they are across-the-board reductions.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
HAVE YOU noticed (we certainly have) how eager are millionaire pundits and politicians to reduce the federal deficit by something they call "shared sacrifice"? In exchange for closing some tax loopholes, they want to cut corporate and individual tax rates, as well as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid benefits. In their view of "shared sacrifice," the rich pay less and the people just barely making it lose more of the cushion they are counting on to keep afloat. Social Security, for example, lifted 21.4 million people, including 14.5 million senior citizens, over the poverty line last year.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Top Republicans and Democrats in the Philadelphia area saw reasons to cheer Paul Ryan's selection Saturday as Mitt Romney's running mate - but their reasons were markedly different. GOP leaders said Ryan's sweeping proposals to cut taxes and spending offered voters intellectual heft on the fiscal issues at the center of the presidential campaign. Democrats proclaimed that they had been handed a ripe target and a chance to cast Ryan's support for Medicare cuts and upper-income tax breaks as the latest evidence that Romney is the candidate of the rich.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - House Republicans resurrected the specter of Medicare rationing Thursday in an election-year vote to repeal cost controls in President Obama's health-care overhaul. In the GOP crosshairs is a board that would be empowered to force cuts to drug companies, insurers, and other service providers if Medicare spending balloons. A Republican plan announced this week, laying down a dividing line between the parties, also would limit Medicare cost increases, but it would rely on competition among private insurance plans.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania nursing-home operators, already hit hard by last year's cuts in federal and state funding, face another revenue loss in Gov. Corbett's proposed budget for the fiscal year starting July 1. The budget proposal, released Tuesday, calls for a 4 percent cut in the Medicaid reimbursement rate for nursing homes. The total revenue loss for nursing homes is projected by the Pennsylvania Health Care Association to be $46.5 million. That amounts to a nearly $8-per-day reduction in the average daily reimbursement of $194 for Medicaid patients, the Harrisburg trade group for nursing-home operators said Wednesday.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Good news for seniors: The government says Medicare's basic monthly premium will rise less than expected next year, by $3.50 for most. It could be good, too, for President Obama and Democrats struggling for older Americans' votes in a close election. At $99.90 per month, the 2012 Part B premium for outpatient care will be about $7 less than projected as recently as May. The additional money that most seniors will pay works out to about 10 percent of the average Social Security cost-of-living increase they will also be due. Some recently enrolled younger retirees will actually pay less: $99.90 a month, down from $115.40 this year.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - "Supercommittee" Democrats proposed a "grand bargain" of spending cuts and new taxes to reduce deficits, picking up Wednesday where President Obama and House Speaker John A. Boehner broke off this summer as the panel has four weeks left to strike a deal. The package, up to $3 trillion, was a first peek at what have been mostly closed-door deliberations. But it drew swift resistance from Republicans who objected to the idea of new taxes. "I don't think it was seen as a serious offer," said a GOP aide familiar with the discussion, who was not authorized to speak on the record.
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