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Medication

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NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers spend their days faxing, calling, copying, talking with people across a desk, filling out complex forms to get drug companies to give free medicines to people who cannot afford them. It may not sound like the most exciting volunteer work in Philadelphia, but this award-winning project does have an impact. Besides helping patients get lifesaving medicines, it saves the city about $2 million a year. A one-month supply of some drugs can cost from $300 to $500, so some patients "would have no other choice except to not take these medications and would have all the complications from their disease, and they would die from it eventually," said Yelena Galkin, an internal-medicine doctor who is clinical director of city Health Center 10 in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's sole medical marijuana dispensary closed this summer without warning, leaving registered patients with a tough choice. They would have to cope with severe nausea, muscle spasms, seizures and pain without the medication, or make a purchase underground, risking arrest. "It's very frustrating for patients, even tragic," said Roseanne Scotti, director of the New Jersey Drug Policy Alliance, a research group that advocates for the legalization of marijuana. "Many say, thank God for the illegal market.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Tiller was in a state of despair on Jan. 7, when yet another hospital worker came into his room. He was homeless. Estranged from his daughter. Hadn't had a drink in a week. And his hands - on their way to losing parts of six fingers, the result of frostbite - "looked like something out of Halloween . " The worker sat down. "She said, 'I know you from somewhere,' " recalled Tiller, 61. They started tossing out names from the Southwest Philadelphia community where both had lived.
SPORTS
October 13, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - As the Boston Red Sox disintegrated in what would become the worst September collapse in baseball history, some at Fenway Park grew concerned that the pain medication Terry Francona was taking after a half-dozen procedures on his knee was affecting his ability to manage, according to a report in the Boston Globe. In a 2,500-word, front-page article headlined, "Inside the Collapse," the newspaper spread the blame on all sides: apathetic players eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games; a general manager who squandered a $161 million budget on underperformers; ownership that thought players could be bought off with $300 headphones and a party on John Henry's 164-foot yacht, "Iroquois.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
SPORTS
August 29, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On the morning of Sunday, March 16, 2014, John Moffitt woke on the floor of a Chicago holding cell, his mouth bloody, his memory blank. The catalysts for his reckless night had still been swimming through his bloodstream when police had locked him in the cell with 40 other men, having arrested him on charges of battery and drug possession after Moffitt, standing 6-foot-4 and weighing more than 300 pounds, had tussled with a bouncer at a nightclub called...
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
A Montgomery County woman was charged Wednesday in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, who police said ate her mother's prescription medication. Police said Christina Griffith was in a Motel 6 in King of Prussia last July when some of her medications fell to the floor and her daughter ate them. Griffith, 35, of Collegeville, did not seek immediate medical treatment for her daughter, Trinity, officials said. The charges against Griffith include involuntary manslaughter and endangering the welfare of children.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
IT HAS BEEN 20 years since Oregon adopted the nation's first Death with Dignity law, allowing physicians to prescribe lethal medication to terminally ill patients. And it has been 17 years since the legal challenges were defeated and the law took effect. That's more than enough time to conclude that the law has not led to a rash of coerced suicides by family members tired of taking care of Granny. It did not lead to a rash of anything, in fact. Data from the Oregon Public Health Division show that between 1997 and 2013, 1,173 terminally ill patients received prescriptions for life-ending medication and only 752 of them decided to use the medication.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THE SEATS in the tiny waiting room in Center City were filled. Many of those at the Youth Health Empowerment Project (Y-HEP) health center Monday night were picking up their prescriptions for Truvada, the only FDA-approved daily pill proven to decrease the risk of HIV infection by more than 90 percent. Since its approval by the feds in 2012 and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's release of guidelines last year, the medication has been slowly making its way into the mainstream in Philadelphia at Y-HEP and other clinics.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Inspira Medical Center Woodbury Inc. last year had its first operating profit since 2010, the hospital reported Monday. The Woodbury facility, which is part of Inspira Health Network, had an operating gain of $2.69 million last year, up from a loss of $4.57 million in 2014, on strong outpatient revenue, Inspira said. Inspira said that Woodbury did better than budgeted in outpatient surgeries, physical therapy visits, diagnostic radiology procedures, cardiac catheter laboratory cases, and emergency room visits.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
New Jersey didn't flunk, though some patients said it deserved a D or an F when its medical marijuana program was graded by a nonprofit that lobbies for cannabis patients. The state got a C in the annual report issued by the Americans for Safe Access Foundation, which evaluated the programs of 40 states nationwide. New Jersey was given credit for adopting a plan but lower marks for its slow pace in implementing it and for allowing too few patients to participate. About 5,000 patients have enrolled.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Mary Woolley and Robert L. Bixby In passing a spending bill for 2016, Congress seemed to acknowledge that medical research had been cut too deeply for over a decade and agreed to boost funding for it in the coming months. But without reforms to address the basic structural problems in the federal budget, downward pressures on research and other important national priorities can be expected to continue. Consider what's at stake: Cutting-edge immunotherapy work at Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center to help achieve the goals of the "moonshot" initiative to cure cancer.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
A Montgomery County woman was charged Wednesday in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, who police said ate her mother's prescription medication. Police said Christina Griffith was in a Motel 6 in King of Prussia last July when some of her medications fell to the floor and her daughter ate them. Griffith, 35, of Collegeville, did not seek immediate medical treatment for her daughter, Trinity, officials said. The charges against Griffith include involuntary manslaughter and endangering the welfare of children.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. Distefano, Staff Writer
Johnson & Johnson plans to cut about 3,000 employees, or 1 in 20, from its global medical-device workforce in hopes of saving up to $1 billion in yearly costs. The drug and medical-supply company will use that money to invest in "new growth opportunities," J&J said Tuesday. In a statement to employees, J&J said the cuts would "accelerate its pace of innovation. " The company expects a pretax restructuring charge of up to $2.4 billion by 2018, including $600 million later this year.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Shirley H. Barol, 94, of Philadelphia, a mother who managed her husband's medical practice, died Tuesday, Dec. 22, at home of complications from cancer. Mrs. Barol was married for 57 years to Daniel H. Barol, a pediatrician affiliated with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Hospital. He maintained a private practice for 35 years in Center City. Mrs. Barol became the office and business manager of the practice after raising her children. "She devoted significant energy to overseeing both the medical and family business affairs," her family said.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
With the new year come thoughts of losing weight, and for some that may mean trying a new weight-loss drug. Weight-loss medications have had a checkered history. But after a long drought in the diet drug market, several new ones have recently been introduced. Last April, drugmaker Novo Nordisk announced its entry, a daily injection called Saxenda, which contains a higher dose of the active ingredient in the company's diabetes drug Victoza. It's too soon to say what the $1,000-per-month Saxenda will mean for long-term weight control.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A historic vote to make medical marijuana legal in Pennsylvania is on hold. After a bill cleared a key House committee last week, legislators had said they hoped to put the measure to a vote as soon as Monday. But Stephen Miskin, spokesman for House Republicans, said Monday that lawmakers were still sorting through 99 proposed amendments to the bill. He said it was unclear if the chamber would consider the issue before the Thanksgiving break. Lawmakers are scheduled to convene again Tuesday in their last voting session of the week.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Joe Brandt, Daily News Staff Writer
In the weeks after Pope Francis blessed their ailing daughter during his visit to Philadelphia, Joe and Kristen Masciantonio probably spent more time in the cancer ward at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia than at Mass at St. Cyril of Jerusalem in Bucks County. But last week, Joe said, scans showed that a troublesome tumor in 1-year-old Gianna's brain shrank significantly after rounds and rounds of surgeries and chemotherapy, to the point where it's "basically gone. " The girl's stunning reversal of fortune - following a dire diagnosis from her doctors - led one family friend to call Gianna's encounter with the pontiff "the Miracle on Market Street.
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