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Medication

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers spend their days faxing, calling, copying, talking with people across a desk, filling out complex forms to get drug companies to give free medicines to people who cannot afford them. It may not sound like the most exciting volunteer work in Philadelphia, but this award-winning project does have an impact. Besides helping patients get lifesaving medicines, it saves the city about $2 million a year. A one-month supply of some drugs can cost from $300 to $500, so some patients "would have no other choice except to not take these medications and would have all the complications from their disease, and they would die from it eventually," said Yelena Galkin, an internal-medicine doctor who is clinical director of city Health Center 10 in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's sole medical marijuana dispensary closed this summer without warning, leaving registered patients with a tough choice. They would have to cope with severe nausea, muscle spasms, seizures and pain without the medication, or make a purchase underground, risking arrest. "It's very frustrating for patients, even tragic," said Roseanne Scotti, director of the New Jersey Drug Policy Alliance, a research group that advocates for the legalization of marijuana. "Many say, thank God for the illegal market.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Tiller was in a state of despair on Jan. 7, when yet another hospital worker came into his room. He was homeless. Estranged from his daughter. Hadn't had a drink in a week. And his hands - on their way to losing parts of six fingers, the result of frostbite - "looked like something out of Halloween . " The worker sat down. "She said, 'I know you from somewhere,' " recalled Tiller, 61. They started tossing out names from the Southwest Philadelphia community where both had lived.
SPORTS
October 13, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - As the Boston Red Sox disintegrated in what would become the worst September collapse in baseball history, some at Fenway Park grew concerned that the pain medication Terry Francona was taking after a half-dozen procedures on his knee was affecting his ability to manage, according to a report in the Boston Globe. In a 2,500-word, front-page article headlined, "Inside the Collapse," the newspaper spread the blame on all sides: apathetic players eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games; a general manager who squandered a $161 million budget on underperformers; ownership that thought players could be bought off with $300 headphones and a party on John Henry's 164-foot yacht, "Iroquois.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A bill that would let victims of post-traumatic stress disorder use medical marijuana passed the New Jersey Senate on Monday. An identical bill was approved by the Assembly on June 16, so the measure now awaits Gov. Christie's consideration. "Veterans - especially post-9/11 veterans - are the group most affected by PTSD," Sen. Vince Mazzeo (D., Atlantic) said in a release. "The VA has stated that it wants each veteran to find the medication with the least amount of side effects that allows them the optimum level of independence.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Anyone who feared that making physician-assisted suicide legal would lead to an onslaught of assisted deaths can relax. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Ezekiel Emanuel finds that only a tiny fraction of the dying want help speeding up the process. However, Emanuel is concerned about the reasons people are choosing to die - horrible pain is sixth on the list - and says doctors remain less supportive of assisted suicide than the general public. He said that the topic requires more study and that states that have legalized it should be keeping much better records of problems that patients encounter.
SPORTS
August 29, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On the morning of Sunday, March 16, 2014, John Moffitt woke on the floor of a Chicago holding cell, his mouth bloody, his memory blank. The catalysts for his reckless night had still been swimming through his bloodstream when police had locked him in the cell with 40 other men, having arrested him on charges of battery and drug possession after Moffitt, standing 6-foot-4 and weighing more than 300 pounds, had tussled with a bouncer at a nightclub called...
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A judge declared a mistrial late Wednesday night after jurors said they could not reach a unanimous verdict in the trial of a Chester County lawyer accused of killing his 92-year-old father by withholding medical care. Edward J. O'Brien III, 60, a lawyer from West Whiteland Township, was charged with third-degree murder, aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, and reckless endangerment in the 2013 death of his father, Edward J. Jr. Jurors began deliberating Wednesday afternoon and continued for more than eight hours before declaring an impasse.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 20, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The regulations that will govern Pennsylvania's nascent medical-marijuana industry are quickly taking shape. The state released a draft of the rules Thursday that all aspiring cannabis growers and processors will have to follow to win - and keep - one of 25 potentially lucrative permits. Gov. Wolf signed the medical-marijuana bill into law in April. Patients with one of 17 medical conditions expect to be able to buy state-approved cannabis by 2018. The draft regulations - more than 90 pages of them - define how Pennsylvania marijuana should be cultivated, protected, and tracked.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Arnold J. Greenspon, For The Inquirer
Half of cardiac arrest patients don't make it to the hospital alive. But a local man had a guardian angel looking out for him the day that he collapsed on the sidewalk while running errands - a nurse happened to be passing by and started CPR. He was rushed to a nearby hospital, where he suffered multiple seizures. Then, he was transferred to Jefferson Hospital for Neurosciences under the assumption that he collapsed due to seizures. But an assessment there found his seizures were likely due to lack of oxygen in the brain caused by the cardiac arrest.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Lankenau Medical Center received Level 2 Trauma Center certification, effective Sept. 1, the unit of Main Line Health said Tuesday. Main Line said last year that the trauma center would fill a gap in such high-level emergency services in southern Montgomery County and northern Delaware County. The center is Main Line's second. It opened a Level 2 trauma center at Paoli Hospital in 2010. The new Lankenau center will compete, in particular with Penn Presbyterian's Level 1 trauma center, in University City, which is closest to Lankenau.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A bill that would let victims of post-traumatic stress disorder use medical marijuana passed the New Jersey Senate on Monday. An identical bill was approved by the Assembly on June 16, so the measure now awaits Gov. Christie's consideration. "Veterans - especially post-9/11 veterans - are the group most affected by PTSD," Sen. Vince Mazzeo (D., Atlantic) said in a release. "The VA has stated that it wants each veteran to find the medication with the least amount of side effects that allows them the optimum level of independence.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Don Karpowich said he was determined to make lawmakers understand how deeply distressed many veterans are when he testified last month in favor of a New Jersey bill that would allow them to use medical marijuana for post-traumatic stress disorder. Karpowich, a disabled veteran who has been diagnosed with PTSD, said that when he spoke to the members of the state Senate's health committee, he "looked into each one of their eyes" and explained how 22 veterans a day commit suicide nationwide.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Sommer Hammoud and John Abraham, For The Inquirer
Editor's note: Annette Smith, who lives in the Olney section of Philadelphia, was walking to the train station to go to work on Jan. 12, 2015, when she slipped on black ice and smacked her knee against a curb. "In that instant," she says, "my life completely changed. " Smith, 56, agreed to let her physicians at Rothman Institute tell her story. Sommer Hammoud presents the mystery and John Abraham presents the solution. Last winter, Annette Smith came to our Bensalem office complaining of knee pain after slipping and falling on some ice. She had gone to a local emergency room, where she was examined and taken for X-rays.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Outsourcing specialist Ashfield Commercial & Medical Services is moving its headquarters from Ivyland to an 80,000-square-foot space in Fort Washington to accommodate a continuing expansion, the company said in a release on Thursday. Ashfield, a unit of UDG Healthcare PLC, is moving to the new location following the growth of its workforce to 1500 members from 120 in 2007, the company said. The Fort Washington space is 60 percent larger than the previous location. The new headquarters will feature an auditorium, a full-service cafeteria and other amenities, Ashfield said.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania Health System plans a new office tower at the current site of a mostly empty lot at 3600 Civic Center Blvd. to be built in phases beginning in early 2017, an official said. The 540,000-square-foot, 18-story Center for Healthcare Technology building is to be constructed beside an existing patient parking garage that opened in 2015, Penn Medicine spokeswoman Susan Phillips said in an e-mail on Wednesday. The building's first phase of construction will result in a 250,000-square-foot, eight-story office building for Penn Medicine corporate functions, including information technology and human resources, and a childcare center for the institution's employees, Phillips said.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
A subsidiary of Irvine, Calif.-based American Healthcare Investors has acquired a 48,000-square-foot medical office building at 502 Centennial Blvd. in Voorhees for $11.3 million. GAHC3 Voorhees NJ MOB L.L.C. purchased the building from Allcol Surgery Holdings L.L.C., real estate services firm Markeim Chalmers Inc., which helped broker the transaction, said in an e-mail on Monday. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's medical marijuana bill was signed into law in April, but it will be two years before most patients can take advantage of it. That's how long the state has to come up with specific regulations to build this industry. Judging from the range of topics and speakers Friday at a daylong "Medical Marijuana Regulatory-Palooza," it may take at least that long to figure it all out. "We are about to do something that has never been done before," said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
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