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Medication

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NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers spend their days faxing, calling, copying, talking with people across a desk, filling out complex forms to get drug companies to give free medicines to people who cannot afford them. It may not sound like the most exciting volunteer work in Philadelphia, but this award-winning project does have an impact. Besides helping patients get lifesaving medicines, it saves the city about $2 million a year. A one-month supply of some drugs can cost from $300 to $500, so some patients "would have no other choice except to not take these medications and would have all the complications from their disease, and they would die from it eventually," said Yelena Galkin, an internal-medicine doctor who is clinical director of city Health Center 10 in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's sole medical marijuana dispensary closed this summer without warning, leaving registered patients with a tough choice. They would have to cope with severe nausea, muscle spasms, seizures and pain without the medication, or make a purchase underground, risking arrest. "It's very frustrating for patients, even tragic," said Roseanne Scotti, director of the New Jersey Drug Policy Alliance, a research group that advocates for the legalization of marijuana. "Many say, thank God for the illegal market.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Tiller was in a state of despair on Jan. 7, when yet another hospital worker came into his room. He was homeless. Estranged from his daughter. Hadn't had a drink in a week. And his hands - on their way to losing parts of six fingers, the result of frostbite - "looked like something out of Halloween . " The worker sat down. "She said, 'I know you from somewhere,' " recalled Tiller, 61. They started tossing out names from the Southwest Philadelphia community where both had lived.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
SPORTS
October 13, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - As the Boston Red Sox disintegrated in what would become the worst September collapse in baseball history, some at Fenway Park grew concerned that the pain medication Terry Francona was taking after a half-dozen procedures on his knee was affecting his ability to manage, according to a report in the Boston Globe. In a 2,500-word, front-page article headlined, "Inside the Collapse," the newspaper spread the blame on all sides: apathetic players eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games; a general manager who squandered a $161 million budget on underperformers; ownership that thought players could be bought off with $300 headphones and a party on John Henry's 164-foot yacht, "Iroquois.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
UPDATE: John Kramer was arraigned early Thursday and his bail was set at $15,000 on two counts of reckless endangerment and one count each of harassment and violating a court order, according to court records. He has not yet posted the 10 percent – or $1,500 – he needs to be released. Kramer's next court date is set for Dec. 18. JOHN KRAMER wants you to know he's not a bad person. Two days after he sent his speeding red Corvette plunging into the Delaware River in a spat with his estranged wife, Kramer turned himself in to police yesterday to face charges that he'd violated a restraining order, harassed his estranged wife and endangered the police divers who had to fish the car out of the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012
Twelve South Jersey residents now appear to have been sickened by contaminated steroid medication that has caused 247 illnesses and 19 deaths, state and federal officials said Wednesday. The local cases - half women and half men, ages 26 to 77, all recovering - received epidural injections for back pain between July 12 and Sept. 26, the day the medication was recalled, at the only three locations in the Philadelphia region that received shipments: Premier Orthopaedic Associates and South Jersey Healthcare Regional Medical Center, both in Vineland, and SJH Elmer Hospital in Elmer.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Men have been aging for . . . well, forever. What's newer is the great increase in the apparent need for testosterone replacement medication - often without tests of a man's current condition and in the wake of commercials by pharmaceutical companies on TV programs watched by 40-to-60-year-old men. Beyond the euphemistic and delicate discussion of sexual dysfunction or waning verve is the concern that such medicine increases the risk of heart...
SPORTS
May 13, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dylan Tolbert hasn't reduced his effort, just his stress level. "I just decided, senior year, I was going to make this fun and not a job," Tolbert said. Tolbert's new approach has paid big dividends. The senior second baseman leads St. Augustine with a .473 batting average (26 for 55) and also has scored a team-best 17 runs. On Saturday, Tolbert was 3 for 3 and reached base four times as St. Augustine beat Clearview, 5-2, in the first round of the Joe Hartmann Diamond Classic.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Pennsylvania lawmakers are again taking a crack at legalizing medical marijuana, with the Senate passing a bill Tuesday to allow the drug to be prescribed for epilepsy, chronic pain, cancer, and other ailments. A previous effort failed in the fall. Backers hope that by delivering it to the House earlier in the legislative session, with a supportive governor and a window of compromise surrounding the budget, it can pass this year. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), who cowrote the bill, said having a governor who is enthusiastic about medical marijuana "changes the dynamic completely.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a town hall meeting hosted Saturday by the Department of Veterans Affairs, former service members spoke of their struggle to receive benefits and medical care for ailments that have worsened as they age. Joan Lanoie, a 57-year-old veteran in the audience, worried their stories were a window into her own future. "I don't want what these gentlemen are saying to happen to me," Lanoie, her voice cracking, told a panel of VA officials. "And then I'd have to rely on the VA. . . . I appreciate what you're doing.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DURING GRAPHIC testimony yesterday, a former Philadelphia deputy medical examiner snaked a belt around prosecutor Peter Lim's neck, demonstrating for a jury how he believes Dr. Melissa Ketunuti's killer tightened a leather belt around her neck before setting her body on fire. Dr. Gary Collins, now Delaware's chief medical examiner, testified for the prosecution on the third day of trial for 39-year-old Jason Smith. Smith is the exterminator accused of killing Ketunuti, 35, before binding her neck, wrists and ankles and setting her body ablaze Jan. 21, 2013 when he visited her Southwest Center City rowhouse to address a rodent problem.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years after he was exposed to Agent Orange in the steamy jungles of Vietnam, Bob Evans was prescribed morphine to kill his excruciating pain. He lived mostly in a stupor until early last year, when he began weaning himself off the addictive drug. A few months later, Evans, 66, surprised his family and friends by dancing with his daughter, Amanda, at her wedding. "I feel so much better," Evans said in an interview last month in the Mount Laurel home he shares with his wife, Donna.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS 40,000 RUNNERS barreled down Broad Street, four law-enforcement officials were in a race of their own. The prize was more than a medal and bragging rights - it was a man's life. FBI Special Agents Erik Negron, Tom Powell and Brian Hoffman, as well as Philadelphia Police Officer Matthew Fleming, took action Sunday morning during the Broad Street Run, working together to revive a 35-year-old man, one of two runners who had gone into cardiac arrest, authorities said last night. It happened in a split-second, according to Special Agent J.J. Klaver, an FBI spokesman.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
A middle-age man in excellent health awoke one morning, turned to check the time on his bedside clock - and realized that overnight, he had gone blind in one eye. In a panic, he took himself to the emergency room of a nearby hospital, where he was told he had probably suffered a stroke that had blocked the artery leading to his retina. His doctors were perplexed. The patient had no history of vascular disease or heart problems, and had been religiously taking a daily low-dose aspirin for years.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WOULD NOT have been surprising to find Dr. Milton A. Wohl, a distinguished physician, repairing a tractor on his farm in Schwenksville, putting in a crop of corn, cutting down a tree or working a piece of wood in his shop. Dr. Wohl was a prominent orthopedic surgeon, former president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, and a highly regarded teacher. But he was also a farmer, a handyman who could take anything mechanical apart and fix it, a historian, music lover, fisherman and world traveler.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
John H. O'Brien, a state police lieutenant who was named director of the New Jersey medical marijuana program more than three years ago, has resigned. O'Brien retired and his family is relocating, said Donna Leusner, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Health, in response to an e-mail asking for information on O'Brien's April 4 resignation. In a statement, O'Brien, 54, who was with the state police for 26 years, said he was "grateful for the opportunity to be a part of one of the more significant social changes in recent history.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A week after the New Jersey State Assembly passed bills that would require the Health Department to improve the troubled medical-marijuana program and consider adding post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of ailments that qualify for the drug, the health commissioner announced Wednesday that she will convene a group of medical experts to make recommendations on whether to expand the list. Currently, patients who suffer one of about a dozen ailments and diseases - including terminal cancer, HIV-AIDs, seizure disorder, and multiple sclerosis - are eligible to get a photo identification card to purchase medical marijuana from one of the state's three dispensaries.
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