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Medication

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NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers spend their days faxing, calling, copying, talking with people across a desk, filling out complex forms to get drug companies to give free medicines to people who cannot afford them. It may not sound like the most exciting volunteer work in Philadelphia, but this award-winning project does have an impact. Besides helping patients get lifesaving medicines, it saves the city about $2 million a year. A one-month supply of some drugs can cost from $300 to $500, so some patients "would have no other choice except to not take these medications and would have all the complications from their disease, and they would die from it eventually," said Yelena Galkin, an internal-medicine doctor who is clinical director of city Health Center 10 in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's sole medical marijuana dispensary closed this summer without warning, leaving registered patients with a tough choice. They would have to cope with severe nausea, muscle spasms, seizures and pain without the medication, or make a purchase underground, risking arrest. "It's very frustrating for patients, even tragic," said Roseanne Scotti, director of the New Jersey Drug Policy Alliance, a research group that advocates for the legalization of marijuana. "Many say, thank God for the illegal market.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bioterrorist attack has exposed a swath of Philadelphia to anthrax and thousands of residents need antibiotics to try to ward off the deadly bacterial infection. That scenario was part of Saturday's training session for nearly 200 new volunteers with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps. "Imagine 20,000 Philadelphians coming through here, getting medications" for anthrax, said physician Steve Alles, standing in the gymnasium of the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, where the training exercise was held.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Tiller was in a state of despair on Jan. 7, when yet another hospital worker came into his room. He was homeless. Estranged from his daughter. Hadn't had a drink in a week. And his hands - on their way to losing parts of six fingers, the result of frostbite - "looked like something out of Halloween . " The worker sat down. "She said, 'I know you from somewhere,' " recalled Tiller, 61. They started tossing out names from the Southwest Philadelphia community where both had lived.
SPORTS
October 13, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - As the Boston Red Sox disintegrated in what would become the worst September collapse in baseball history, some at Fenway Park grew concerned that the pain medication Terry Francona was taking after a half-dozen procedures on his knee was affecting his ability to manage, according to a report in the Boston Globe. In a 2,500-word, front-page article headlined, "Inside the Collapse," the newspaper spread the blame on all sides: apathetic players eating fried chicken in the clubhouse during games; a general manager who squandered a $161 million budget on underperformers; ownership that thought players could be bought off with $300 headphones and a party on John Henry's 164-foot yacht, "Iroquois.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Giving former inmates with histories of addiction monthly injections of a medication that blocks the effects of opioids cuts relapse rates by a third, according to research at five medical centers. Release from prison is among the riskiest times for former addicts, with the loss in physical tolerance and behavioral control so common that often "they relapse the same day," said Charles P. O'Brien, senior author of the study and founding director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Studies of Addiction.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A judge declared a mistrial late Wednesday night after jurors said they could not reach a unanimous verdict in the trial of a Chester County lawyer accused of killing his 92-year-old father by withholding medical care. Edward J. O'Brien III, 60, a lawyer from West Whiteland Township, was charged with third-degree murder, aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, and reckless endangerment in the 2013 death of his father, Edward J. Jr. Jurors began deliberating Wednesday afternoon and continued for more than eight hours before declaring an impasse.
SPORTS
August 29, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On the morning of Sunday, March 16, 2014, John Moffitt woke on the floor of a Chicago holding cell, his mouth bloody, his memory blank. The catalysts for his reckless night had still been swimming through his bloodstream when police had locked him in the cell with 40 other men, having arrested him on charges of battery and drug possession after Moffitt, standing 6-foot-4 and weighing more than 300 pounds, had tussled with a bouncer at a nightclub called...
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NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The law signed by Gov. Wolf on Sunday legalizing medical marijuana in Pennsylvania provides for an ambitious set of research programs to track how the drug works on the 17 health conditions listed in the law. But investigations are already underway, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society held a telephone conference Wednesday to discuss recent scientific findings. Many doctors remain dubious of pot's health benefits and are wary of the politics driving legalization. But the evidence of its effectiveness in some conditions is slowly mounting.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Hundreds of cheering families, legislators and patients watched Gov. Wolf sign a medical marijuana bill into law Sunday afternoon, many hopeful at last for relief from debilitating pain, seizures and other medical conditions. Allie Delp watched from her mother's lap, purple sunglasses strapped around her wide blue eyes to protect them from the light. Large crowds are tough for Allie. The 4-year-old suffers from Dravet syndrome, a severe seizure disorder, and most days she stays in the dimly lit, cool comforts of her home to avoid triggers.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Chad Terhune, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The number of potentially deadly infections from contaminated medical scopes is far higher than what federal officials previously estimated, a new congressional investigation shows. As many as 350 patients at 41 medical facilities in the U.S. and worldwide were infected or exposed to tainted gastrointestinal scopes from Jan. 1, 2010, to Oct. 31, 2015, according to the Food and Drug Administration. A separate Senate investigation released in January found 250 scope-related infections at 25 hospitals and clinics in the U.S. and Europe.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
Both houses of Pennsylvania's legislature have belatedly voted to take the merciful and pragmatic step of legalizing marijuana for medicinal use. The trouble is that, particularly in the House, lawmakers couldn't resist saddling the measure with overwrought restrictions reminiscent of the Rube Goldberg bureaucracy the state still imposes on another once-prohibited drug, alcohol. The state Senate can either substantially improve the legislation, which would require reapproval by the lower chamber, or largely accept it, getting the measure to Gov. Wolf's desk as quickly as possible and leaving major changes for another time.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
New Jersey's newest medical marijuana dispensaries have a different vibe - and offer deeper discounts - than the first crop of alternative treatment centers that opened in 2012 and 2013. Gone are armed security guards at the entrances and rigid prices. The two dispensaries that launched last fall have a more relaxed atmosphere for patients and offered discounts and specials that knocked the average price of $489 an ounce down to the $300 range, more in line with Western states. The fresh competition has caused prices to tumble among the state's five dispensaries.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ISSUE | ABORTION They're medical clinics Please stop referring to the targets of violence as abortion clinics ("Threats, violence were up at abortion clinics in 2015," Wednesday). These are medical clinics that offer women services that include the legal procedure of terminating a pregnancy. |Marie Conn, Hatboro, mconn56@yahoo.com
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Police Department will receive a $50,000 donation to purchase additional kits of naloxone, an opiate antidote, authorities announced Wednesday. More than 1,000 Philadelphia police officers already have been trained to use the medication - also called Narcan - and it has prevented overdoses for more than 125 people in the city, according to the District Attorney's Office. The office said it helped secure donations from Independence Blue Cross and the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Help patients now As an institution that cares for many of Pennsylvania's cancer patients, the Penn State Cancer Institute was thrilled about Vice President Biden's "moonshot" to accelerate the development of treatments and cures. But we can't forget about the nearly 700,000 Pennsylvania cancer patients who need treatment today. House Bill 60, the Oral Chemotherapy Parity Act, would provide affordable access to oral anticancer medications. An outdated insurance law makes these medications cost-prohibitive for many patients, especially compared with intravenous chemotherapy.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
Women account for more than a third of physicians in the United States. This was not always the case. Consider the story of one of the first American female doctors: Bucks County resident Susan Parry. Before the Civil War, the quality of medical education and practice varied across the country. Sham schools opened on the Western frontier and awarded degrees as quickly as they could be printed, while a handful of cities - including Philadelphia - boasted long traditions of rigor and innovation.
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