CollectionsMedication Errors
IN THE NEWS

Medication Errors

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 6, 2005 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A regional effort to prevent hospital patients from being harmed by medication errors has made progress, but more must be done, according to a new report. Launched in February 2001 by the Delaware Valley Healthcare Council and two leading patient-safety organizations, the Regional Medication Safety Program for Hospitals sought to give hospitals the tools needed to reduce mistakes that injure and kill patients. A report on the program being released today concludes that participating hospitals had a 22 percent improvement toward meeting the council's goals.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2003 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Independence Blue Cross, which has long been at odds with local hospitals over its payment policies, committed $750,000 yesterday to fund a regional effort aimed at reducing medication mistakes in hospitals. The grant will complete funding for the $1.3 million Regional Medication Safety Program for Hospitals, which began in June 2001 but had lacked the money to complete its three-year mission. The program, which provides 65 hospitals in Southeastern Pennsylvania with education and training on reducing errors, is being led by the Delaware Valley Healthcare Council, the hospital lobbying group that has sparred with Independence in the past.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rationing medical care is denounced as immoral in the United States, yet it goes on daily in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, ambulances, and pharmacies. Since 2006, this country has had worsening shortages of sterile generic injectables - drugs given by shots or intravenously. Currently, more than 300 medicines crucial to treating cancer, infections, cardiac arrest, premature infants, pain, and more are in short supply. The reasons for this predicament are complex, and the fixes, elusive.
NEWS
March 9, 2005 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Computerized prescription-ordering systems are promoted as the answer to preventing medication errors in hospitals, but a new study shows the technology also can cause mistakes. The study at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania found that computer systems that allowed doctors to order drugs electronically, rather than writing orders, could lead to a variety of errors, including requesting drugs for the wrong patient or at an incorrect dosage. "What is supposed to be the great solution is itself a source of errors," said Ross Koppel, a Penn sociologist who led the study.
NEWS
July 3, 2008
The article on medication bar-coding gives the impression that new technologies make no difference in reducing hospital errors ("Bar codes no cure for drug errors," July 1). This has not been our experience. In 2004, we were among the first health systems to institute a medication administration bar-coding system. Since then, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center has reduced the number of reported medication errors by almost 40 percent. Additionally, more than 7,000 medication errors have been prevented across our system by notifying the nurse before the wrong medication was given.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer
A West Philadelphia mental health agency whose group homes for the retarded have come under harsh criticism has agreed to transfer those homes to some other agency in an effort to salvage its contractual relationship with the city. The city was scheduled today to end contracts totaling about $4 million with the West Philadelphia Community Mental Health Consortium, a non-profit agency hired to run outpatient and residential programs for the mentally ill and day and residential programs for the retarded.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bar codes, those omnipresent catalogers of everything from cereal to CDs, were long touted as the perfect solution to medication mistakes in hospitals. But bar codes make new problems and aren't the panacea that safety advocates expected, a research team lead by Ross Koppel of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has concluded. In a first-of-its-kind study, Koppel and colleagues from the University of Wisconsin and the Main Line Health System spent several years observing the use of bar-code technology in five hospitals.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Color matters in medical errors. Names do, too. And label look-alikes - they're one of the biggest problems of all. As a pharmacy student at Temple University almost 40 years ago, Michael Cohen noticed that small problems often led to grave mistakes. Today, those lifesaving observations will be rewarded with a life-altering prize. Cohen, president of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, an independent watchdog group investigating medication errors, is receiving a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The acting dean of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science said he is surprised that officials have been unable to identify who was responsible for the accidental death of an infant at Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital last month. The dean, John A. Gans, made the observation last week at a press screening of a training videotape about medication errors in hospitals. Officials at the Darby hospital have said a "human error" in the hospital's pharmacy was responsible for the child's death.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the fall, the Pennsylvania Department of Health fined St. Agnes Medical Center $447,500 for laboratory errors in the blood tests of hundreds of patients. Three of those patients died. Yesterday, the state announced a settlement allowing St. Agnes to divert the fine - the largest penalty ever levied against a state hospital - to pay for improvements at the hospital and community-education programs. Normally, fines would go into the state's general fund, said Richard McGarvey, Health Department spokesman.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Craig MacGregor feels betrayed - by his doctors, by the health-care system and, devastatingly, by his own fingers. For much of the last 40 years, he played bass for Foghat, the classic rock band best known for the hit "Slow Ride. " Now, his fingertips have grown bulbous - "clubbed," doctors call it, a side effect of chemotherapy to treat his advanced lung cancer. He can barely play music at all anymore. "Overnight, it's gone," he says. "That's a hard thing to accept. " Even harder: Though he didn't learn of his cancer until last year, it actually was first detected four years ago during a CAT scan to check for broken ribs after a fall.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rationing medical care is denounced as immoral in the United States, yet it goes on daily in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, ambulances, and pharmacies. Since 2006, this country has had worsening shortages of sterile generic injectables - drugs given by shots or intravenously. Currently, more than 300 medicines crucial to treating cancer, infections, cardiac arrest, premature infants, pain, and more are in short supply. The reasons for this predicament are complex, and the fixes, elusive.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Michael Cohen, For The Inquirer
Emily Jerry was just 2 years old when she died from a medication error made by a pharmacy technician in a Cleveland hospital. She had undergone surgeries and four rounds of chemotherapy to treat what doctors said was a highly curable malignant tumor at the base of her spine. Emily's past treatments had been so successful that her last MRI showed the tumor had miraculously disappeared, her parents say. This last treatment on her second birthday was just to be sure that no traces of cancer were left inside her. Tragically, the technician mixed her final dose of chemotherapy improperly, in a saline solution that was 23 times more concentrated than it should have been.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration announced a broad new initiative Tuesday to reduce medical errors, partnering with private insurers, business leaders, hospitals, and patient advocates to tackle a problem that kills thousands of Americans every year. The campaign, funded by the health-care overhaul the president signed last year, aims to cut the number of harmful preventable conditions such as infections that patients acquire in the hospital by 40 percent over the next three years.
NEWS
July 19, 2009 | By Marie McCullough and Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
James Armstrong had no way to know that his prostate-cancer treatment had gone dangerously awry as he recovered from the brief procedure at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center in August 2007. Doctors for the Vietnam War veteran from West Philadelphia, however, should have known, federal investigators concluded. The dozens of tiny radioactive seeds they had implanted in Armstrong's prostate gland were delivering only about a quarter of the radiation called for in his treatment plan - too little by established standards to wipe out his cancer.
NEWS
July 3, 2008
The article on medication bar-coding gives the impression that new technologies make no difference in reducing hospital errors ("Bar codes no cure for drug errors," July 1). This has not been our experience. In 2004, we were among the first health systems to institute a medication administration bar-coding system. Since then, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center has reduced the number of reported medication errors by almost 40 percent. Additionally, more than 7,000 medication errors have been prevented across our system by notifying the nurse before the wrong medication was given.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bar codes, those omnipresent catalogers of everything from cereal to CDs, were long touted as the perfect solution to medication mistakes in hospitals. But bar codes make new problems and aren't the panacea that safety advocates expected, a research team lead by Ross Koppel of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has concluded. In a first-of-its-kind study, Koppel and colleagues from the University of Wisconsin and the Main Line Health System spent several years observing the use of bar-code technology in five hospitals.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, nine patients got infusions of the wrong type of blood at hospitals around the region, errors that typically added thousands of dollars in treatment charges paid by Medicare. Hospitals will soon have to bear much of the cost of fixing their own mistakes. Medicare issued rules this month that will end payments for extra care resulting from certain medical mistakes starting Oct. 1, 2008. The new rules prohibit passing these charges on to patients, so hospitals will end up absorbing the costs - and, Medicare hopes, working harder to prevent mistakes.
NEWS
July 6, 2007
The first-ever survey of surgical mix-ups in Pennsylvania shows that most patients are at little risk of becoming victims. That's not to say there is no cause for concern: Commercial flights are safe, for the most part. But no one wants to be in that one airplane - or operating room - where things fall apart. Here's the unsettling reality: A regular flow of reports on near-misses and wrong-site surgeries comes into the state's Patient Safety Authority, which gathered and reported the error data last week.
NEWS
June 21, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Triaminic Vapor Patches, used to treat children with coughs and colds, are being voluntarily recalled after several bad reactions, including a seizure. The over-the-counter cough suppressant works through inhaled vapors to loosen up congestion. More than 50 million patches have been sold in the United States since they first came on the market in 2000, said Julie Masow, a Novartis Consumer Health spokeswoman. There have been eight adverse events with the patch, all involving ingestion, Masow said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|