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Meditation

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NEWS
August 17, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mark Ludak
Vivian Rankin, who was among 300 persons who took part in Harmonic Convergence rites today at the Art Museum, has a quiet moment early this morning. The 300 was a bit short of the 10,000 event organizers had hoped for, but they were there about 6 a.m. for the chanting, humming and meditating they hope will help usher in a new age of human experience. The Harmonic Convergence began yesterday and ends today.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Maria Novaro's tranquil study of skirmishes on the California/Mexico border, the garden always looks more profuse on the other side. To a gringa arriving in Tijuana, the foliage and local color there are much richer than where she comes from. But to a farmer she meets and falls in love with, the U.S. side of the border is the promised land. Novaro's loose-limbed Garden of Eden is part travelogue, part meditation on the fact that whales can freely move across the border without a change in species or status, but that people can't.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Amy Huntoon
T'ai Chi Ch'uan is a traditional Chinese movement form, intended both as a system of self-defense and an aid to meditation. It came this month to the Juniata Park Older Adult Center. Instructor Andrew Heckert gave a demonstration on Oct. 19. Twenty-one people, ages 57 and up, attended, and a 10-week workshop in T'ai Chi Ch'uan began last week. The exercises that are being taught at the workshop emphasize balance over strength, and are characterized by slow, relaxed circular movements.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For all of his popularity on compact disc, Estonian composer Arvo P?rt - the best known among a school of Eastern Europeans called "the holy minimalists" - is surprisingly absent from the concert hall. His 1988 hour-long setting of the St. John Passion Gospel - titled Passio - is heard live so seldom that Friday's performance by the chorus Voces Novae et Antiquae and the Rel?che ensemble at the Trinity Center for Urban Life had the buzz of an event. The crowd was youngish and artsy, no surprise since P?rt's music echoes ancient chant so popular a few years ago. Also, the music is heartily accommodated by the electronic age, its spareness lending itself to recordings made in resonant venues where the sanctimonious silences have a shot at making sense.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Sometimes the only way out," says Jenny Phillips, "is in. " That's the jailhouse mantra at the Donaldson Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison in Bessemer, Ala. The barbed-wire-wreathed bunker resembles the cheerless pen in The Shawshank Redemption except that at Donaldson, murderers serving life terms don't break out. At least not physically. Mentally though, through a Vipassana meditation program introduced by Phillips in 2002, some Donaldson inmates are breaking the cycles of anger and revenge that got them there in the first place.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Zenlike in its mix of the serene and the wise, the whimsical and the jarringly odd, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, winner of the grand prize at the Cannes Film Festival in May, is a beautiful, slow-moving meditation on life, death, and relationships that transcend time and space. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, the Thai director whose experimental fusions of fiction and documentary have won a passionate following in international cinema circles, opens Uncle Boonmee with a dreamlike excursion into the woods, where a water buffalo lopes in the dark.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Wearing a blue hoodie, pants cut off at the knee and tan sneakers, Wendy Carroll is on the run from her own sad life. In her 20s and alone, she pulls into a drizzly Oregon town, has car problems, gets into trouble with the law, and then loses her dog, Lucy. That's about the sum of what happens in Kelly Reichardt's Wendy and Lucy , except to say that somehow, thanks to an extraordinary performance from Michelle Williams and an exceptionally deft hand from her director, this low-budget and loping little film is a genuine heartbreaker.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For 15 minutes a day, Tim Frazier, Penn State's senior point guard, finds a quiet place, switches on a podcast, and meditates. Along with his teammates, Frazier, the team's all-time leader in assists, has found that practicing mindfulness meditation - focusing on the breath with his eyes closed and becoming aware of his thoughts without judging them - has amped up his performance on the court. "The game moves so fast, it's hard to focus on the here and now," said Frazier, who is pretty fleet of foot himself.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | By Nicole Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Coatesville Area school board unanimously agreed last night to require district schools to begin their day with a moment for meditation. Coatesville becomes the only district in Chester County with a mandatory moment for meditation. Until now, Coatesville - like several other districts - had a policy of voluntary meditation. Speaking before the vote, School Board President Ron Scott said, "It is our duty to instruct and direct our children. . . . It's very much supported by the public.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Several people are sitting silently on blue cushions in a third-floor room, their legs crossed, their eyes closed. It looks like they might be practicing traditional Buddhist meditation, and in a way they are. But they're not seeking enlightenment - they're students in a stress-management class. And their teacher is not a Buddhist monk - he's a doctor at Graduate Hospital. What's going on in the room is part of a revolution in the medical profession. Eastern-style meditation increasingly is being used not as alternative treatment, but as one more tool in the doctor's medical bag. "There's nothing foreign or exotic about it," says Dr. Michael Baime, chief of internal medicine at Graduate, who leads the eight-week classes in meditation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Anthony Bonetti feels anxious and has trouble falling asleep, the 10-year-old checks in with his Smiling Mind app. The calming voice instructs him to close his eyes and focus on his breathing, taking 10 slow breaths while feeling his belly rise and fall. In just a few minutes, the fourth grader feels sleepy and relaxed. "He gets worked up easily, and this unwinds him from the day," said his mom, Claire. At first skeptical of adding more electronics to her son's life - "they create stimulation" - she downloaded the app to her phone about a year ago so they could use it together.
NEWS
March 29, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Jon Kabat-Zinn took off his jacket and shoes, rolled up his sleeves, and struck a Buddha pose. Sitting mountain like, he called it. "I'm sure you're waiting for what's next. The answer is nothing," Kabat-Zinn told 300 people in the Haverford College auditorium. They had come to hear Kabat-Zinn, 71, the internationally renowned guru of "mindfulness-based stress reduction," a meditative practice that the molecular biologist pioneered in 1979 as a way to help people with chronic illness.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Right there on national TV, live, newscaster Dan Harris froze. It could have meant the end of his career. As he'd frequently bemoaned - not entirely in jest - he could wind up in a flophouse in Duluth. But it didn't. And he didn't. He went on to become one of the top newscasters in the country, co-anchoring ABC's Nightline and the weekend edition of Good Morning America , among other high-profile news gigs. Harris wrote about his journey in a book, 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help that Actually Works - A True Story . He'll also speak about it Thursday evening at the Franklin Institute as part of an Einstein Healthcare Network event, one of many marking the Einstein network's 150th anniversary . He gave us a preview, talking about taking up meditation and mindfulness, which is his secret to being 10 percent happier.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
Five men with "CAMDEN COUNTY CORRECTIONAL FACILITY" printed on their mustard-yellow scrubs sit in plastic chairs facing Stephen Michael Tumolo. "We usually start," he says, "with a moment of stillness. " The beige, bare-bones classroom goes quiet. But elsewhere in the minimum-security unit of the massive facility in downtown Camden - currently home to some 1,400 male and female inmates - an undercurrent of boisterous voices flows on. And staccato chatter ("Mental health 1-2-3, Mental health 1-2-3")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
In lieu of flowers, the bridesmaids bore rocks. Each woman carried a nugget of Block Island, then they walked to an open field and set the rocks down in a circle. It was June 2013, and the longest day of the year. Jenny and Burton stepped into the center of the ring, where they spoke vows extemporaneously - whatever brimmed in their hearts at that moment. This wedding, in a place Burton had visited as a child and where he'd nearly proposed to Jenny after seven months of courtship, was a chance to let family and friends see who they were as a couple - not only during the ceremony, but at brunch the next day, at the beach, and at a bonfire where a friend strummed guitar.
SPORTS
October 4, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY, N.J. - The hip-hop music was cut off on Friday afternoon as another session of Sixers training camp wound down. And then the Stockton University basketball gym filled with the sounds of chirping birds and soothing music. In a new training camp ritual, it was time to meditate. The Sixers players laid on their backs in a row and propped their feet onto a chair. An onlooker in the crowd asked if the team was really meditating. The players crossed their hands on their chests and closed their eyes.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The papal visit is a time for ritual, prayer, and meditation. Research has shown that such activities - even outside a religious context - change our brains for the better. Andrew B. Newberg, a neuroscientist and director of research at Jefferson University Hospitals' Myrna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine, specializes in the neurological study of religious and spiritual experiences, an emerging field known as neurotheology. He has taken hundreds of brain scans of nuns in prayer, of Buddhists during meditation, of people involved in rituals, while speaking in tongues, and during trance states.
NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was only 6 p.m., but the stingy winter sun was long gone when a dozen middle-aged men and women arrived at the Penn Medicine outpost in Radnor. They gathered in a wood-paneled conference room and settled into comfortable office chairs arranged in a circle. Ranging from their late 30s to early 60s, most were strangers and professionally had little in common. One was a fund-raiser for a private foundation, another a pharmacist who works with terminally ill children. There also were a couple of psychologists, a lawyer, a banking software consultant, and a few retirees.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a young boy, Stephen Reichenbach found himself "drawn to the quiet" of the woods of Cinnaminson, his hometown. "I had already begun my meditation practice" on those solitary walks, the 60-year-old recalled recently. For religion, however, he pedaled his bike to the local Catholic church, never imagining his attraction to "the mystery" he sensed in the woods and the Latin Mass would put him one day in the black robes of a Zen abbot. Those woods of Cinnaminson are long gone and so, in a sense, is Stephen Reichenbach.
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