CollectionsMeditation
IN THE NEWS

Meditation

NEWS
October 18, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Six years ago, Katherine Handin was diagnosed with renal-cell carcinoma, a disease of the lining of the kidney that is often fatal. Handin beat the odds - more than 80 percent of patients with the disease die - and has been free of cancer since then. She credits meditation and faith with saving her life. "I wouldn't be here right now if it weren't for [meditation]," said Handin, a former promotions coordinator for Epic Records in New York City. "Instead of thinking 'I'm going to die,' I was able to say, 'I'm still alive, right here and now.' " Handin is teaching others the power of meditation as coordinator for Penn's Stress Management Program.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Brandon Heinz, an eighth grader in the Bristol Township School District, told occupational therapist Charles E. Gallagher that he had been asked to sit still "millions of times. " The problem is that it's not always easy. For Brandon, 14, and his classmates - students with autism, attention-deficit disorders, or other special needs - controlling signs of anxiety is often a struggle. So Gallagher made a suggestion: Breathe. "In through your nose, and out through your mouth," he instructed.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When tensions start to build, it might seem trivial to plop on a cushion and ponder the essence of nothingness. But practitioners of meditation say it is an ancient, time-tested method for relieving stress, solving conflict, and bringing inner happiness. It can even be used, they say, as a vehicle to disseminate positive thoughts and mental goodwill into a hope-starved world and, most recently, to victims of the Indian Ocean tsunami. Health professionals also tout meditation as a path to wellness and calm.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
"SONIC DREAM space": That's what this 12-by-6-foot room is supposed to be. But at first glance it's just a small rectangular room, painted white, with a chair against the back wall. As the lights go down, and the music comes up, the room begins to live up to its name. The room, located in Jeweler's Row, is the home of the Sound Resolution Center. Equal parts meditation space and art project, the center specializes in 25-minute sound sessions meant to plunge a participant in a room filled with ambient music and changing lights.
NEWS
April 22, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The silence in an upstairs room at the Friends Center is so loud on this Saturday every sound seems amplified: the tap of raindrops on a window; a police siren outside; the tick-tock of a grandfather clock. Inside, six members of the Lilac Breeze Sangha meditation group seek internal peace and presence of mind. They sit still. They breathe slowly. They walk in a circle, as if in slow motion. This is the regular alternate-Saturday meeting of a meditation group started by Quakers and since joined by people from other faiths, or from none at all. The Lilac Breeze Sangha, which meets for 2 1/2 hours every other Saturday in Center City, is a meditation group that combines theology, practice and philosophy.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Kate Campbell FOR THE INQUIRER
Embrace the present moment. Be aware of each breath and mindful of your posture. It sounds tantalizingly simple. It isn't. Spiritual instructions in the Zen Buddhist tradition of meditation offer lifelong challenges on the road to enlightenment. But the Rev. Pat Enkyo O'Hara, a child of the Sixties and a Zen Buddhist priest, says that by overcoming distraction, you can discover that each moment - whether blissful or banal - holds the perfect opportunity to live to the fullest.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the greatest prayers of Judaism is the   Amidah   , a recitation of 19 blessings that devout Jews say three times a day. Jews all over the world will recite the   Amidah   Tuesday night and Wednesday as they mark Yom Kippur, the solemn day of atonement when God is said to decide who will live or die in the coming year. Many will bow deeply as they face Jerusalem. But as members and friends of Mishkan Shalom Synagogue in Manayunk gather Wednesday for this holiest of days, hundreds will recite the Amidah not by bowing, but lying still, on their backs, in the yoga position known as "the Corpse.
NEWS
December 22, 2008 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
Michelle Gossett has ovarian cancer that has metastasized to her liver, colon, bladder and uterus. She had just had a punishing chemotherapy treatment that will make her feel intensely ill in a day or so. But on this night she is participating in a session on mindful meditation, one in a series of eight led by Michael Baime, a physician who has just been named director of mind-body medicine at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania....
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A serene smile, almost as luminous as his yellow and gold silk robes, seems permanently creased on the face of Phramaha Pairote Plaito, head monk of the newly constructed Mongkoltepmunee Buddhist Temple here. Phramaha Plaito welcomes the opportunity to share a belief he thinks is universal. "All the teachings of the Buddha can be summed up in three rules: Do no evil. Do good. Purify your mind. " But what about life's gray areas? Simple. Phramaha Plaito says one need only consider the ultimate consequences.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Andy Myer
In an extraordinary turn of events in an extraordinary week, the following series of e-mail messages was discovered by Brian Dribbitz, a 14-year-old computer whiz who apparently hacked his way into the White House computer system. This is the unedited correspondence downloaded by Brian: Begala@whitehouse: James, had an idea this morning! I think I see a way out of this mess, maybe turn the whole disaster around. how about gettin' the Prez onto Oprah! That lady's flyin' at the moment, probably well on her way to a Nobel Peace Prize or something.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|