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Meditation

NEWS
January 11, 2009 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peta Raabe, 56, of Society Hill, a founding partner of Lager Raabe Skafte Landscape Architects, who designed the Wellness Community of Philadelphia's cancer meditation garden in Fairmount Park and other green spaces that beautify the city, died of breast cancer Wednesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. In the last 20 years, she and her partners designed several major open-space projects in Philadelphia, including the expansion and renovation of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Aviator Park at Logan Square, the slope at JFK Boulevard near 30th Street Station, playgrounds at Clark Park and Shot Tower, a master plan for Old City, and landscape guidelines for the Parkway.
NEWS
December 22, 2008 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
Michelle Gossett has ovarian cancer that has metastasized to her liver, colon, bladder and uterus. She had just had a punishing chemotherapy treatment that will make her feel intensely ill in a day or so. But on this night she is participating in a session on mindful meditation, one in a series of eight led by Michael Baime, a physician who has just been named director of mind-body medicine at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania....
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Gene D'Alessandro FOR THE INQUIRER
Sarah Elliott always had trouble meditating. The psychic benefits of yoga also left her cold. But the lawyer-turned-stay-at-home-mother struck spiritual gold when she walked her first labyrinth. "It really hooked me early on," said Elliott, who chairs the Labyrinth Project at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Fort Washington. Labyrinths are not mazes intended to confuse the walker, she says, but a single path that leads to the center and back out again. The Rev. Marek P. Zabriskie, rector at St. Thomas, hopes to have an outdoor labyrinth at the church by spring.
LIVING
May 25, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The students stand silently, arms arcing up and out like a blossom unfolding in the sun. It's a particularly apt metaphor here in the East Conservatory at Longwood Gardens. In warm weather, Linda Welti Piotrowski's tai chi class practices outside on the patio overlooking the gardens' famous fountains. But gathering on cooler days inside this soaring glass house, with its tropical palms and rushing water, is a gift unto itself. "There's always so much beauty here," says student Lyn Johnson, a retired merchandise coordinator who lives down the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sitcom by Lars von Trier? A funny film by the same man whose Breaking the Waves transformed Emily Watson from a na?f into a mystical prophet-cum-prostitute chosen by God for sacrifice by a band of vicious thugs? The Danish auteur already has directed the comedy The Idiots, a savage satire about a group of clueless anarchists. But The Boss of It All, about an actor hired by the secret owner of an IT company to dissemble plans to sell the business, is just so frothy and slight.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Though their work mainly suggests otherwise, Guariglia and Chen do not come through the fine-art channels. Not so long ago, Justin Guariglia was a documentary photographer; Zoe Chen is a fashion designer who has worked for Issey Miyake. Together, the two have created a seamless, quasi-conceptual collaborative art that borrows its look from the worlds of fine art, advertising, commercial photography and Buddhism (that their work was recently selected for a two-year Nokia print and TV ad campaign and will also be the subject of a book published by the Aperture Foundation tells you something about its broad appeal)
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When an Exton physician departs for South Africa on Feb. 15, she will be bringing with her more than what she learned at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. There will be plush toys. Quilts. And a meditation technique. Susan Ward, 52, will be one of four meditation teachers from the U.S., three from France and one from Scotland who will be visiting orphans afflicted with AIDS. It is Ward's third trip since May 2004 to such children in Johannesburg and in towns in the province of KwaZulu-Natal.
NEWS
November 12, 2006 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world can seem like a chaotic mess - war in Iraq, nukes in North Korea, suffering in Sudan. But Bill Sands has good news: That's all going to change, and soon, within our lifetime. What's more, this region will play a happy role in the transformation. Maharishi Peace Palaces are going to be built in West Philadelphia and Cherry Hill, among thousands planned worldwide, Sands says. They will serve as havens where devotees of Transcendental Meditation will alter the physical reality of the planet through the power of their collective thought.
NEWS
September 27, 2006 | By ED GALING
OVER THE PAST few weeks, I've been reading the obituary column with more interest than ever. There was time I read only the front-page news, the columns, the letters to the editor, Stu Bykofsky - and never gave the obits even a glance. I guess I just didn't want to know more than I had to about death. But ever since my wife Esther died recently at 88, and left me by myself in our little Cape Cod, I've been thinking of how I would like my own obit to read when I die. The thing that interests me the most are the ages of those who died.
NEWS
July 11, 2006 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Live a good Left life in this true-blue city, and there's no limit to how high you can rise. Well, the height of the building sets a limit, or stone ceiling. These days you'll find Victor Navasky - editor and publisher emeritus of the Nation, Delacorte Professor at Columbia, director of the Delacorte Magazine Center, chairman of Columbia Journalism Review, author of the prize-winning A Matter of Opinion - nestled on the high-security eighth floor of Journalism, a historic Columbia building dedicated to freedom of information and openness.
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