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FOOD
December 24, 2009
Cheese of the Month The "Roaring Forties" evokes the brutal gales that howled along 40° longitude to wreck many a tall ship against tiny King Island between Tasmania and South Australia. So why is the blue cheese named in their honor so sweet and mellow? Legend has it the straw mattresses from those ill-fated vessels washed ashore and seeded King Island's lush pastures - grasses that now nourish some of the richest milk Down Under. This decadent cow's milk blue is the ultimate proof of that.
NEWS
September 2, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
On the flyers announcing Fish & Grill's debut in a modest commercial strip (jeweler's, Chinese take-out, pizza) along Bustleton Avenue near Grant, Riza Canca is proud to note, in his slightly imperfect English, that the hopeful enterprise is a "family operating business. " And so it is as the evening unfolds, a daughter eventually offering Turkish coffee, a son shyly peeking from his mother's side, Canca's wife, Gul (which translates as "Rose"), explaining her Mediterranean cookery, and, not least, a stolid grandmother, her head wrapped in a kerchief, coaxed to take a bow for the delicate, homey baklava that ends the evening.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Bill Wine, FOR THE INQUIRER
Not one, not two, not three, but four aces. Four. And all of them in my greedy, trembling little hand. Not the kind of odds-defying luck you necessarily expect as you sit at a poker table in the middle of the night in the casino of an Italian cruise ship. But then, once you've submitted to the oceanic irony of playing Caribbean stud while sailing on the Mediterranean, anything's possible. Including the instantaneous running-out of said luck. Headed my way, as the luxury liner (once defined as "a bad play surrounded by water")
NEWS
November 10, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Walid Assaf, the manager of Al Dar Bistro in Bala Cynwyd, remembers those heady days in the 1980s when people had large expense accounts and enjoyed eating out a lot. The Lebanese owners of Al Dar had a French restaurant in the same location, Assaf said. "It was the trend for people to go out in the 1980s and enjoy French food," Assaf said. "Now they want something less expensive, so we have a bistro. " Open since 1991, Al Dar - it means "place for a feast" - offers a wide range of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern food.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia schools Superintendent Constance Clayton, Joel Bloom (center) of the Franklin Institute and Robert Palestini, superintendent of archdiocesan schools, check out one of the 100 artworks on display in the institute's Jason Project Mural Contest. The murals, full of fish and other sealife, were submitted by city fifth- and sixth-graders. They depict explorer Robert Ballard's upcoming Mediterranean underwater expedition, called the Jason Project.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Explorer Robert Ballard, famous for finding the Titanic, Bismarck and other sunken ships, says his next expedition will be to the bottom of the Mediterranean and Black Seas, where he believes thousands of ancient Greek and Roman ships lie waiting to reveal secrets of old trade routes. Ballard has an edge over archaeologists. He recently acquired a nuclear submarine, on loan from the Navy. At a lecture Thursday night at Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences, Ballard, 53, showed slides of the Titanic and of Roman ships found in shallower parts of the Mediterranean.
FOOD
August 25, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
A cluster of grapes has a certain classical beauty to it. It's no wonder that grapes have graced works of art for years. Now, grapes are enjoying a new popularity as a design element, thanks to two trends: the prevalence of fruit motifs and the current design craze for Mediterranean. Colors from nature are the important colors for the '90s, says Seattle designer Stacy DuCharme. Mediterranean fruits and vegetables - like olives, grapes and eggplant - bring these colors to flavorful life.
NEWS
February 3, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The United States has resumed a military buildup in the eastern Mediterranean, and now has two carrier battle groups and a Marine force on station, Reagan administration sources said yesterday. A three-ship force - carrying about 1,900 Marines and Navy SEAL commandos and led by the helicopter carrier USS Saipan - linked up during the weekend with the nuclear-powered carrier USS Nimitz and its nine escort ships. Both groups were south of Cyprus, due west of Israel, officials said.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | By Ken Fireman and Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The United States yesterday reluctantly canceled a meeting with six close allies because of French and British fears that the meeting, on Middle East terrorism, might endanger Western hostages in Lebanon. The U.S. government also said that its military presence in the eastern Mediterranean would be reduced to discourage speculation about a strike in the Middle East. The meeting was to have convened in Rome today or tomorrow among representatives of the seven industrial nations that meet yearly for economic conferences: Canada, France, Britain, Japan, Italy, the United States and West Germany.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THERE'S LITTLE doubt that President Obama's "red line" - the use of chemical weapons - has been crossed in Syria's bloody, two-year civil war, but what comes next is less certain. Last week, the aid group Doctors Without Borders announced that more than 3,600 patients displaying neurotoxic symptoms had been seen at Damascus-area hospitals within hours, and that more than 350 had died. The Syrian government called the allegations "absolutely baseless. " The apparent attack by Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces brought forceful rhetoric from Secretary of State John Kerry and has Obama mulling a limited military strike.
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FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For its next production, FringeArts will raise the curtain Friday on La Peg , a brasserie, in its headquarters at Columbus Boulevard and Race Street, across from Race Street Pier. La Peg (140 N. Columbus Blvd., 215-375-7744) occupies the front of a century-old former fire department pumping station. From almost every part of the restaurant, you can see the Ben Franklin Bridge, whose distinctive towers and steel cables seem to loom over the dining room through the large, arched windows.
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If President Obama ever does get around to targeting Syria, with congressional approval, it will be the strangest U.S. military strike in recent memory. The administration has made a convincing case that the Syrian regime gassed 1,400 of its own people to death last month, including 426 children. And yes, the use of poison gas violates longstanding international norms. Yet Obama can't seem to make up his mind if he wants to punish Syria for using chemical weapons or not. On Saturday, he made a strong case for using military action to deter anyone from deploying these terrible weapons again.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THERE'S LITTLE doubt that President Obama's "red line" - the use of chemical weapons - has been crossed in Syria's bloody, two-year civil war, but what comes next is less certain. Last week, the aid group Doctors Without Borders announced that more than 3,600 patients displaying neurotoxic symptoms had been seen at Damascus-area hospitals within hours, and that more than 350 had died. The Syrian government called the allegations "absolutely baseless. " The apparent attack by Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces brought forceful rhetoric from Secretary of State John Kerry and has Obama mulling a limited military strike.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Pour on the olive oil, preferably over fish and vegetables: One of the longest and most scientific tests of a Mediterranean diet suggests that this style of eating, even loosely defined, can substantially reduce the chance of heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk. The study lasted five years and involved nearly 7,500 people in Spain. Those who ate Mediterranean-style with lots of olive oil or nuts had a 30 percent lower risk of major cardiovascular problems compared with those who were told to follow a low-fat diet but who did not, in reality, cut out much fat. Mediterranean meant lots of fruit, fish, chicken, beans, tomato sauce, salads, and wine - and little soda, baked goods, and red meats.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
Early crowds are finding ambition in Lansdowne at the gorgeous NoBL , a Mediterranean BYOB that opened last week in a long-ago hardware store at 24 N. Lansdowne Ave. (484-461-2689) It's a block off Baltimore Avenue — north, to be exact — which explains "NoBL. " It's the crew from the nearby Sycamore — owner Stephen Wagner and chef Sam Jacobson, who turns out such small plates as moussaka, mussels, pappardelle with chicken livers; grilled octopus; grilled artichokes; and 10-inch grilled pizzas.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2011 | By Tom Koppel, For The Inquirer
The rampart of rock soars straight up; we crane our necks to see the top. Scattered across the vertical face, nearly 1,000 feet high, are stunted windswept junipers that cling bravely to the odd crevice. The layering and subtle colors of stratification turn the cliff into an abstract canvas painted by a giant. A couple of bright red kayaks paddle by along the base, where the sea laps at the limestone. They are so dwarfed by the vast geological dreamscape that they look like toys. My wife, Annie, and I are passengers on a small tour boat exploring a network of fjords, a dramatic wonderland of water and towering walls of stone that you could mistake for Norway, or maybe Alaska.
NEWS
June 12, 2011 | By Don Melvin, Associated Press
ABOARD THE STEVE IRWIN - Tuna fishermen battled environmentalists on the Mediterranean, hurling heavy links of chain at them as the environmentalists tried to disrupt illegal tuna fishing under the no-fly zone north of Libya on Saturday. The fishermen also tried to lay a rope in front of the activists' boat, the Steve Irwin - owned by the U.S. group the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society - hoping to disable it. Environmentalists responded with fire hoses and stink bombs. Several hundred feet above the fray circled a French fighter jet summoned by the fishermen, who claimed, falsely, that activist divers were trying to cut their net. The 195-foot Steve Irwin, named after the Australian conservationist who died in 2006, left the Sicilian port of Syracuse early Friday, heading for a rendezvous with a smaller, faster sister ship, the Brigitte Bardot, just north of Libyan waters.
NEWS
November 10, 2010
Frances Klein Alberstadt, 82, of Plymouth Meeting, a former advertising manager and hospital volunteer, died of cancer Monday, Nov. 8, at Keystone Hospice in Wyndmoor. Mrs. Alberstadt, the daughter of a Philadelphia Daily News driver, graduated from Overbrook High School. She studied photography and then briefly worked with a commercial photographer. In the late 1940s, she joined Herbach & Rademan, in Chinatown. She became the electronics firm's advertising manager and produced its monthly catalog.
FOOD
December 24, 2009
Cheese of the Month The "Roaring Forties" evokes the brutal gales that howled along 40° longitude to wreck many a tall ship against tiny King Island between Tasmania and South Australia. So why is the blue cheese named in their honor so sweet and mellow? Legend has it the straw mattresses from those ill-fated vessels washed ashore and seeded King Island's lush pastures - grasses that now nourish some of the richest milk Down Under. This decadent cow's milk blue is the ultimate proof of that.
FOOD
September 10, 2009 | By Aliza Green FOR THE INQUIRER
I visited Turkey in the '70s in worn blue jeans with a backpack and very little money in my pocket. But I was able to feast on meals so memorable that I recall the flavors to this day: I ate lahmacun, flatbread topped with tangy ground lamb, hot from a wood-burning oven; plates of piyaz, made with plump, tender white runner beans, drizzled with lemon; and mussels stuffed with blue-black rice, studded with black currants. I indulged on large, sesame-crusted bread rings sold by street vendors who plucked them from a rod stacked with freshly baked breads, and I savored tiny cups of bitter roasted Turkish coffee, which tempered the sweetness of the kadaif, a shredded wheat pastry stuffed with walnuts and drenched in honey.
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