FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Howard J. Bennett, Washington Post
When a young child gets a cold - congestion, a sore throat, and runny nose, maybe with greenish goo - many parents head to the drugstore for a bottle of children's cold medicine. Don't bother. It's worth it to give children lots of fluid and acetaminophen or ibuprofen if they are uncomfortable. But research has repeatedly shown that cold medicines do not work for children younger than 6, and give only a negligible benefit for children 6 to 12. Parents in my pediatric practice typically express surprise - because these medications appear to work, though that's really just cold symptoms naturally waxing and waning throughout the day - and frustration that there isn't a medicine to just make the cold go away.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHEN ADRIAN Rios arrived in Philadelphia nearly four years ago to begin his studies on the ivy-clad campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the East Los Angeles native was increasingly drawn to political issues, from the plight of Palestinians to a labor fight involving Penn's cafeteria workers. But most of his classmates stayed on the sidelines. That's why it was a life-altering experience - "exciting and nerve-racking," he recalls - last month when he found himself amid about 100 student protesters lying on the floor of a large, heated tent in a protest at Penn president Amy Gutmann's house.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
Thirty-seven states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware will share $40.75 million under a settlement with GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and subsidiary SB Pharmco Puerto Rico Inc. over allegations that some drugs were adulterated during faulty manufacturing processes at a plant in Cidra, Puerto Rico. Glaxo, which has major operations in the Philadelphia region, said it chose to settle the matter "to avoid the expense and uncertainty of protracted litigation and trial. " The company did not admit any wrongdoing.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - Only 18 people have signed up for New Jersey's medical-marijuana registry, but advocates of the program say that's no surprise to them. The state Department of Health says that 44 patients have been declared eligible for the program, which began last Thursday, but as of Wednesday only 18 of them have signed up for permission to use the drug legally. Under the state's procedures, a patient can apply only after a physician has declared that he or she meets the qualifications.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
CAMDEN The Camden that I encounter at the annual meeting of the Cooper's Ferry Partnership seems unfamiliar. Who are these people, I wonder as I walk around the Adventure Aquarium ballroom, where hundreds of professional folks are networking over small plates of chic eats. The theme of the event is "Rediscover Camden," and nowhere to be seen is the familiar Camden - the city cited in "worst" lists and luridly chronicled by visiting celebrity journalists. Instead, it's eds, meds, the new Campbell Soup campus, and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2011
DEAR ABBY : My marriage has been on the rocks since 2008, when I caught my husband talking to other girls online. He swore he would never do it again and I trusted him, only for it to happen again and again. We have a 2- year-old and I'm pregnant with our second child. He has now placed another ad online stating that he's a single dad. I am torn. He keeps telling me he loves me and wants only me, and he doesn't know what's wrong with him. He is bipolar and not taking meds for it. He promised this time he will get help and try to get better.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
The Health Care Innovation Accelerator Pitch Day staged by Penn Medicine was different from most start-up showcases. There seemed to be more at stake. You could almost hear the angst in the Jordan center auditorium last week as presenters addressed treatment issues, some verging on life and death, that harm patients and push America's health-care costs sky-high. So what ails the system? And what are the fixes? Pre-Op+ project presenter and anesthesiologist Marc Royo aims to change the down-to-the-wire nature of pre-screenings for patients with scheduled operations.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
77,344 - Population in 2010 124,555 - Population in 1950 42.5 - Percentage of people living beneath the poverty line $21,191 - Median income for families in Camden 1 - Camden's rank among U.S. cities for lowest median income 9,523 - Total "eds and meds" jobs in the city, 2011 952 - Total "eds and meds" jobs held by city residents, 2011 3 - Number of mayors jailed for corruption since 1981 Sources: U.S Census Bureau, ...
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hannah Thomas, 17, can't pinpoint the day she realized that she would never play soccer again, or when the teenage highs of proms and college acceptances became weighed down by meds, therapy, and running battles with depression, memory loss, and headaches. "I didn't think it was going to be this long, and I sure didn't think it would be this serious," said Thomas, tall and athletic, who got hit in the head with a ball in middle school but finished the season - even though she had daily headaches and nausea.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A BRAZEN GUNMAN opened fire on a delivery driver early yesterday as the man dropped off medication at a North Philadelphia pharmacy, police said. Two nearby day-care centers briefly went into lockdown after the incident, which took place about 10:30 a.m. outside Wellness Pharmacy, on Ridge Avenue near 23rd Street, said Officer Christine O'Brien, a police spokeswoman. The 41-year-old victim, whom police did not identify, was approached by the gunman, who picked a fight with him over the meds he was carrying and tried to steal them, O'Brien said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
The Health Care Innovation Accelerator Pitch Day staged by Penn Medicine was different from most start-up showcases. There seemed to be more at stake. You could almost hear the angst in the Jordan center auditorium last week as presenters addressed treatment issues, some verging on life and death, that harm patients and push America's health-care costs sky-high. So what ails the system? And what are the fixes? Pre-Op+ project presenter and anesthesiologist Marc Royo aims to change the down-to-the-wire nature of pre-screenings for patients with scheduled operations.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
One year after Mumia Abu-Jamal was hospitalized and reportedly near death, his supporters are reviving a petition demanding that prison officials give him medicine that could cure his hepatitis C infection. "Urgent: Mumia is incredibly sick" reads the subject line of an email from Prison Radio, a group of Abu-Jamal supporters, urging readers to sign the petition that Abu-Jamal's brother Keith Cook began circulating last April. This time, however, the emails don't seem linked to an imminent health crisis affecting the killer of Police Officer Daniel J. Faulkner, but to an awaited ruling by a federal judge in Scranton on Abu-Jamal's access to anti-hepatitis drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On having a child with a short-tempered partner: Having a child will increase stress, which, in turn, is likely to make any poor behavior far worse and may place the hypothetical child in direct danger. How often will a child not do what this parent wants, and how far will he or she go when a display of temper still doesn't get results? I was married to someone with an explosive temper. After much soul-searching on my part, we adopted a child together.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Following a report last summer that large numbers of Pennsylvania children on Medicaid, especially those in foster care, are taking psychiatric medications, state officials Tuesday announced steps to address the problem. Those include requiring pre-authorization for antipsychotics, developing guidelines for psychiatric medication use, and creating an "electronic dashboard" that will make it easier for the state Department of Human Services (DHS) to monitor what children are taking.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Gov. Wolf plans to urge Pennsylvania medical and dental schools to bolster their teaching on pain management and opioid addiction to help fight prescription drug abuse, he said Monday. Speaking at a White House briefing, Wolf said he hoped Pennsylvania would follow Massachusetts, where medical and dental schools last year agreed to start requiring students to demonstrate skills aimed at preventing painkiller abuse. "That is a really good idea that Pennsylvania can learn from," he said.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Emergency rooms are increasingly a prime spot for patients seeking powerful pain medications, with doctors caught between the desire to help people in pain and the need to discourage addiction and even overdoses. Temple University Hospital reported Tuesday that it had found a straightforward way to limit prescriptions of these opioid drugs, such as Percocet, Dilaudid, and Vicodin: a set of guidelines that helps ER doctors determine when to say no. Among patients with dental, neck, back, or unspecified chronic pain for which opioids are not advised, the number getting prescriptions dropped below 30 percent immediately after the guidance was distributed in January 2013 - down from 52.7 percent beforehand.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bang! Kapow! Ka-boom! That's how networks serve up their dramas in this ultra-competitive age. Terrified of losing their audiences to FX or Netflix, they slam viewers with shrill, abusive body blows. That's how procedural whiz Dick Wolf opens his new emergency- room melodrama, Chicago Med . Within 90 seconds, we're thrown into the middle of a deadly train derailment The third in Wolf's Chicago triumvirate, after Chicago Fire and Chicago P.D. , the series premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday on NBC. Wolf opens on devilishly good-looking Dr. Connor Rhodes ( Arrow 's Colin Donnell)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2015 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* CHICAGO MED. 9 tonight, NBC10. NO ONE ever starts the first day in a TV hospital filling out paperwork in human resources. So there are things you can just see coming when NBC's "Chicago Fire" spin-off "Chicago Med" pulls out of the station tonight with a train crash for which Dr. Connor Rhodes (Colin Donnell) happens to be present. Quite a few things. But while the newest outpost in producer Dick Wolf's Windy City empire isn't wildly original, it doesn't have to be. Like the components of the Penn grad producer's "Law & Order" franchise, "Chicago Med" is the kind of TV that's topical, briefly gripping but easily shaken off. In a medium where drama junkies increasingly seem to need recaps to confirm (or explain)
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., said Friday it agreed to buy Gecko Health Innovations Inc., a privately-held company that makes software and other products to remind patients to take their respiratory medicine. A Teva spokeswoman declined to reveal the price of the acquisition of the Cambridge, Mass. company. Through the deal, Teva will get Gecko's CareTRxTM, which is a hardware and software product designed to keep track of patient use of inhalers. People suffering from asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often use an inhaler to help them breath more easily.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a lot to like about the current state of the Philadelphia region's economy, particularly in the city, economist Mark Zandi said Tuesday afternoon during a panel discussion at the Union League of Philadelphia. "For the first time in a long time, it feels there's real underlying strength here," said Zandi, who is chief economist at Moody's Analytics. But the goal of the panel was to talk about what keeps the Philadelphia region from excelling economically like rival metro areas, such as Boston; Austin, Texas; and Seattle, and what can be done about it. Other members of the panel - sponsored by a nonprofit, Students Helping Students, which redistributes supplies and furnishings from wealthy schools to poor schools - were Jeremy Nowak, a consultant and former head of the William Penn Foundation, and Matt Cabrey, executive director of Select Greater Philadelphia, a group that markets the region to companies looking to relocate.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|