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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Howard J. Bennett, Washington Post
When a young child gets a cold - congestion, a sore throat, and runny nose, maybe with greenish goo - many parents head to the drugstore for a bottle of children's cold medicine. Don't bother. It's worth it to give children lots of fluid and acetaminophen or ibuprofen if they are uncomfortable. But research has repeatedly shown that cold medicines do not work for children younger than 6, and give only a negligible benefit for children 6 to 12. Parents in my pediatric practice typically express surprise - because these medications appear to work, though that's really just cold symptoms naturally waxing and waning throughout the day - and frustration that there isn't a medicine to just make the cold go away.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHEN ADRIAN Rios arrived in Philadelphia nearly four years ago to begin his studies on the ivy-clad campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the East Los Angeles native was increasingly drawn to political issues, from the plight of Palestinians to a labor fight involving Penn's cafeteria workers. But most of his classmates stayed on the sidelines. That's why it was a life-altering experience - "exciting and nerve-racking," he recalls - last month when he found himself amid about 100 student protesters lying on the floor of a large, heated tent in a protest at Penn president Amy Gutmann's house.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
Thirty-seven states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware will share $40.75 million under a settlement with GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and subsidiary SB Pharmco Puerto Rico Inc. over allegations that some drugs were adulterated during faulty manufacturing processes at a plant in Cidra, Puerto Rico. Glaxo, which has major operations in the Philadelphia region, said it chose to settle the matter "to avoid the expense and uncertainty of protracted litigation and trial. " The company did not admit any wrongdoing.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - Only 18 people have signed up for New Jersey's medical-marijuana registry, but advocates of the program say that's no surprise to them. The state Department of Health says that 44 patients have been declared eligible for the program, which began last Thursday, but as of Wednesday only 18 of them have signed up for permission to use the drug legally. Under the state's procedures, a patient can apply only after a physician has declared that he or she meets the qualifications.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
CAMDEN The Camden that I encounter at the annual meeting of the Cooper's Ferry Partnership seems unfamiliar. Who are these people, I wonder as I walk around the Adventure Aquarium ballroom, where hundreds of professional folks are networking over small plates of chic eats. The theme of the event is "Rediscover Camden," and nowhere to be seen is the familiar Camden - the city cited in "worst" lists and luridly chronicled by visiting celebrity journalists. Instead, it's eds, meds, the new Campbell Soup campus, and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Now that my daughter is 1, I went to see a therapist for help. She diagnosed me with postpartum depression. Honestly, it's a huge relief. Three years ago, I got the same diagnosis (my son is 4 now). Back then (and now), I was treated with cognitive therapy and antidepressants. Back then (and I hope now, too), I was happy and "on my own" after eight months. Everything good, right? Except that my mother is a therapist and is highly against meds.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police are seeking a man and his getaway driver in the theft of a a package containing baby medicine from outside a home last week in the Burholme section of Northeast Philadelphia. The man probably didn't know what was inside. The package had been delivered by Amazon.com and was left on the porch of a house on the 7400 block of Montour Street. Besides baby meds, it contained baby clothes. The theft occurred about 1 p.m. June 6, police said. The home's surveillance video captured the two men pulling up in a two-door car in front of the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2011
DEAR ABBY : My marriage has been on the rocks since 2008, when I caught my husband talking to other girls online. He swore he would never do it again and I trusted him, only for it to happen again and again. We have a 2- year-old and I'm pregnant with our second child. He has now placed another ad online stating that he's a single dad. I am torn. He keeps telling me he loves me and wants only me, and he doesn't know what's wrong with him. He is bipolar and not taking meds for it. He promised this time he will get help and try to get better.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
The Health Care Innovation Accelerator Pitch Day staged by Penn Medicine was different from most start-up showcases. There seemed to be more at stake. You could almost hear the angst in the Jordan center auditorium last week as presenters addressed treatment issues, some verging on life and death, that harm patients and push America's health-care costs sky-high. So what ails the system? And what are the fixes? Pre-Op+ project presenter and anesthesiologist Marc Royo aims to change the down-to-the-wire nature of pre-screenings for patients with scheduled operations.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
77,344 - Population in 2010 124,555 - Population in 1950 42.5 - Percentage of people living beneath the poverty line $21,191 - Median income for families in Camden 1 - Camden's rank among U.S. cities for lowest median income 9,523 - Total "eds and meds" jobs in the city, 2011 952 - Total "eds and meds" jobs held by city residents, 2011 3 - Number of mayors jailed for corruption since 1981 Sources: U.S Census Bureau, ...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Now that my daughter is 1, I went to see a therapist for help. She diagnosed me with postpartum depression. Honestly, it's a huge relief. Three years ago, I got the same diagnosis (my son is 4 now). Back then (and now), I was treated with cognitive therapy and antidepressants. Back then (and I hope now, too), I was happy and "on my own" after eight months. Everything good, right? Except that my mother is a therapist and is highly against meds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
A few years ago, Mount St. Joseph Academy graduate Chierika Ukogu contacted the Nigerian Olympic Committee, asking to represent the country in Rio in 2016 in a rowing event. There was no response. "Just emailing them and telling them, 'Hey, I want to do this,' meant nothing," said Ukogu, who had rowed competitively as part of teams in high school and at Stanford University, where she earned her bachelor's degree. "They ignored me because I didn't have a plan. " So Ukogu, a dual citizen of the U.S. and the western African nation, made a plan.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The University of the Sciences on Monday named the founding dean of Camden's Cooper Medical School of Rowan University as its 25th president. Paul Katz, 68, a physician who specializes in rheumatology and has spent more than 40 years in health care and higher education, will take over at the West Philadelphia university on Sept. 1. He replaces Kathleen R. Mayes, interim leader since Helen F. Giles-Gee resigned in December 2014, 21/2 years into her presidency. "I have enormous respect for Paul," said Marvin Samson, the school's board chairman.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
Third in a series. Read part one and part two here.  The secret to having a long life, a doctor once told me, is choosing your parents very carefully. He wasn't kidding. Diet? Of course. Exercise? Who doesn't know that? Avoid stress? Well, duh. Don't smoke? Well, double duh. But for a gold-plated pass through the Pearly Gates, nothing beats having a flourishing family tree whose roots, generation after generation, are flush with a robust DNA that is passed faithfully along.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police are seeking a man and his getaway driver in the theft of a a package containing baby medicine from outside a home last week in the Burholme section of Northeast Philadelphia. The man probably didn't know what was inside. The package had been delivered by Amazon.com and was left on the porch of a house on the 7400 block of Montour Street. Besides baby meds, it contained baby clothes. The theft occurred about 1 p.m. June 6, police said. The home's surveillance video captured the two men pulling up in a two-door car in front of the house.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Roy Rosin spent a decade in Silicon Valley as innovation boss at Intuit (which makes TurboTax and Quicken software), then headed east five years ago to start as chief innovation officer for Penn 's $5 billion-a-year medical complex. That's a fancy way of saying he finds ways to use software and gadgets to cut costs and boost patient results, working with University of Pennsylvania medical, nursing, engineering, and Wharton scholars, dominant local insurer Independence Blue Cross , and neighborhood investors looking to bet on sexy start-ups.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
As a researcher who raised concerns about what antipsychotics can do to the brain, Nancy Andreasen emphasized one message Wednesday in talks with Episcopal Hospital's psychiatric staff and students: The drugs are still worth using in people with schizophrenia, but should be used as sparingly as possible, especially in children and the elderly. "It doesn't mean that we shouldn't be using antipsychotics," said Andreasen, chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Tom Avril, STAFF WRITER
Long after undergoing bypass surgery, a substantial number of patients fail to take a daily aspirin or statins, raising the risk of dangerous blood clots and heart attacks, a new study finds. In a group of 381 patients who came in for a diagnostic catheterization at least three years after a bypass procedure, barely half were taking both statins and aspirin, according to the research, led by Thomas Jefferson University. The rest - 48 percent of the group - had active prescriptions for just one of the two medicines, or neither.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
The Health Care Innovation Accelerator Pitch Day staged by Penn Medicine was different from most start-up showcases. There seemed to be more at stake. You could almost hear the angst in the Jordan center auditorium last week as presenters addressed treatment issues, some verging on life and death, that harm patients and push America's health-care costs sky-high. So what ails the system? And what are the fixes? Pre-Op+ project presenter and anesthesiologist Marc Royo aims to change the down-to-the-wire nature of pre-screenings for patients with scheduled operations.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
One year after Mumia Abu-Jamal was hospitalized and reportedly near death, his supporters are reviving a petition demanding that prison officials give him medicine that could cure his hepatitis C infection. "Urgent: Mumia is incredibly sick" reads the subject line of an email from Prison Radio, a group of Abu-Jamal supporters, urging readers to sign the petition that Abu-Jamal's brother Keith Cook began circulating last April. This time, however, the emails don't seem linked to an imminent health crisis affecting the killer of Police Officer Daniel J. Faulkner, but to an awaited ruling by a federal judge in Scranton on Abu-Jamal's access to anti-hepatitis drugs.
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