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Meeting Room

SPORTS
March 23, 2012 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer
CALL IT what you want - a clearing of the air, a cleansing of the soul, a blackboard session - the 76ers and their coaches met yesterday for close to an hour at their practice facility at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine to discuss the differences in the team that started the season with a 20-9 record and the one that has won just six of its last 18 games. After Wednesday night's loss to the New York Knicks, coach Doug Collins wouldn't pinpoint any reason for the recent skid, particularly when asked about his use of Evan Turner.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a raucous disruption by Occupy Philadelphia protesters, the city Board of Health approved amended regulations Thursday for groups that feed the homeless outdoors. Groups will be required to obtain a permit from the city and to have at least one member receive free food-safety training from the Health Department. Health Commissioner Donald F. Schwarz said he expected the new rules to be enforced around May 1. The regulations come as the city proceeds with a ban in city parks on feeding the homeless and others who want free meals.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The man with the neatly combed hair and the carefully pressed blue suit blended in well at Wednesday morning's meeting of the all-white, mostly over-45, and mostly male Marcellus Shale Advisory Commission. That is, until he abruptly interrupted the discussion to call the commission's chairman, Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley, a "prostitute. " The interloper was perennial Harrisburg activist Gene Stilp, who came to accuse the commission, assembled last month by Gov. Corbett, of being a tool of the oil and gas industry.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2010 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
As he vacuumed new carpeting in a soon-to-be-unveiled meeting room inside the greatly expanded Convention Center, Pat Taylor felt a sense of accomplishment. "It looks really nice," Taylor, 18, of Downingtown, said as he paused in his work, looked up, and surveyed a room that just three months ago was still taking shape. "It feels great that we can make a room like this beautiful," said Taylor, a member of Laborers Union Local 57. The $786 million expansion of the center - described as the city's "dream house" when it was being developed two decades ago - is 87 percent complete, on track, and on budget for its highly anticipated March debut, said Joe Resta, project executive for the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority, which is overseeing the expansion.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
At precisely 10 p.m. Saturday at the American Philosophical Association's sprawling conference in the Philadelphia Marriott - the annual mass gathering of those who practice the world's oldest non-conclusive profession - a philosophical point was made. Evondra Acevedo, the academic group's employment coordinator, had announced that the "Candidates' Room," where graduate students and others apply for teaching jobs, was closed for the night. She'd been going since 3 p.m. A sign announced that the room would close at 10 p.m. She asked the 11 candidates still seeking service to come back in the morning.
NEWS
December 7, 2005
Decades later, head injury's effects still felt I agree with the editorial "Heads up on head injuries" on Nov. 26, and I am living proof to the long-term effects of a concussion. My concussion did not occur during a sporting event. Ten days short of my 10th birthday, in 1974, I was hit by a car in front of my house. I spent three days in the hospital and an additional week out of school. To this day, I suffer from bouts of depression, chronic fatigue, and difficulties with memory.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The war is raging all around as Bob Hranek peruses the map of the vast European battlefield. He does not like what he sees. His ships in the North Atlantic have been destroyed, a blitz launched by his pilots has failed, and the Allies have amassed a formidable force of men, tanks and planes in eastern Poland. The outcome of the war, he knows, is likely to be decided on the march to Moscow, and the odds are against him and the German army he commands. Not ready to surrender, he picks up a die and drops it into a cardboard box. It tumbles for a second before settling on a five.
SPORTS
October 13, 1999 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bigger than life? Wilt Chamberlain certainly was that. Big enough to make the NBA change its rules on goaltending and the width of the lane. Big enough to overshadow Muhammad Ali on a television stage. Big enough to make commercials when a point had to be made. But bigger than 7 feet, 1 1/16 inches tall? Nah. The supreme test of his height took place in 1980, when Chamberlain returned to Philadelphia to be honored along with the 76ers' 1966-67 team as the greatest in NBA history, part of the league's 35th anniversary celebration.
SPORTS
August 26, 1999 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Writer
Dozens of people were prevented from entering the meeting room at Community College of Philadelphia because several hundred were already packed inside. They came to talk and shout and argue about the thousands of cars and the tens of thousands of people that would be descending upon their Broad and Spring Garden neighborhood should the Phillies be allowed to build their new stadium on that site. Dozens. Hundreds. Thousands. Tens of thousands. And, in many ways, an audience of one - Councilman Darrell L. Clarke.
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