CollectionsMeeting Room
IN THE NEWS

Meeting Room

SPORTS
October 13, 1999 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bigger than life? Wilt Chamberlain certainly was that. Big enough to make the NBA change its rules on goaltending and the width of the lane. Big enough to overshadow Muhammad Ali on a television stage. Big enough to make commercials when a point had to be made. But bigger than 7 feet, 1 1/16 inches tall? Nah. The supreme test of his height took place in 1980, when Chamberlain returned to Philadelphia to be honored along with the 76ers' 1966-67 team as the greatest in NBA history, part of the league's 35th anniversary celebration.
SPORTS
August 26, 1999 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Writer
Dozens of people were prevented from entering the meeting room at Community College of Philadelphia because several hundred were already packed inside. They came to talk and shout and argue about the thousands of cars and the tens of thousands of people that would be descending upon their Broad and Spring Garden neighborhood should the Phillies be allowed to build their new stadium on that site. Dozens. Hundreds. Thousands. Tens of thousands. And, in many ways, an audience of one - Councilman Darrell L. Clarke.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More than a month has passed since 13 developers submitted land-use proposals for the Haverford State Hospital site to the Haverford Authority, an appointed township board that will eventually recommend uses for the land. Tonight, the authority will meet to discuss the plans for the first time. Residents hoping to discover details of the proposals will have to wait at least a little longer, though. Authority Chairman Fred Moran, who announced the meeting only Friday afternoon, said the discussion would likely focus on procedures for evaluating the proposals, not the proposals themselves.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Quakers, the first European residents of this old riverfront community, worshiped weekly for 313 years in their red-brick meetinghouse on High Street until it closed in 1991. The meeting, the region's oldest, was organized in 1678, four years before William Penn sailed from England for his first visit to the New World. An older building, a hexagonal brick structure, existed for 100 years until it was torn down and a larger meetinghouse was built on High Street in 1783. But by 1991, there were fewer than 10 members, and in Quaker terminology, Burlington Friends Meeting was "laid down.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lisa Boucher, 12, had one question for the Board of Supervisors last night: Why did the township tear down the batting cage she and about 700 other girls from the Newtown Square Petticoat League have used for two years to practice their swing? "They took it down and didn't even ask first," Lisa said as she squeezed into the crowded meeting room. "It wasn't very fair. " Holding signs that read "Why us?" and "Please put our batting cage back," more than 250 residents joined Lisa to find out who gave permission for the cage to be torn down March 12. Speaking for the board last night, Chairwoman Sherry L. Smyth said, "We do not want to cast blame tonight.
SPORTS
September 3, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bad old days of the 1998 preseason are behind these Eagles. Now they face the 16 games that matter, along with the uncertainty and anxiety that linger in the air like cheap cigar smoke. Coach Ray Rhodes attempted to draw a line in the sand - or at least on the erasable board in the meeting room - for his players. "We had a team meeting about what time it is now," Rhodes said. "We're going to start this thing up right. I think everybody got the message. It's going to change.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One speaker likened it to apartheid and segregation. Another called it unfair and un-American. A third warned that his people's very citizenship was at stake. Outside the meeting room, young men handed out flyers calling for marches on Washington and the United Nations. Inside, the crowd of more than 300 cheered and applauded some statements, only to abruptly shake heads in disgust at others. Should Puerto Rico become a state? Should it retain commonwealth status? Or should it chance independence?
REAL_ESTATE
October 26, 1997 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
You could say Pat Montgomery has put her love for Chester County's Highland Township on the wall - of the township building on Gum Tree Road, that is. Montgomery, the township's secretary and a 30-year resident, is painting "the four seasons of Highland" in Grandma Moses style on the supervisors' meeting room wall. The township's offices are in the converted Highland School, which was built in 1937 and is in the process of being refurbished. "I have no artistic talent at all," Montgomery said with a big smile as she pointed to her version of autumn for this 25-square-mile municipality in the county's western reaches.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There were passionate speeches and heated emotions. A developer's history of code violations was recited. Zealous grassroots tactics were denounced. A police escort was summoned. In the end, Whitpain Township supervisors unanimously voted down a zoning change that would have allowed townhouses to be built on 14 acres along Skippack Pike in Whitpain Hills. But the drama of the event won't easily be forgotten. Some locals say the hearing last month was the finest democratic forum this township has held in recent years.
LIVING
October 6, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quien es mas macho? Isaac Cruz, 41, opinionated and proudly traditional, seemed to be the answer. Sitting restlessly in a second floor meeting room at Aspira, a North Philadelphia advocacy group, Puerto Rico-born Cruz insisted that while he is a man of tradition, he is not a machista, an adherent of that centuries-old code of male dominance called machismo. "The problem is that ladies are always trying to control the men," said Cruz, a member of Aspira Corps, a community-service project run by Aspira.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|