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Megan S Law

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NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When 7-year-old Megan Kanka was raped and murdered by a neighbor, a twice-convicted child sex offender, the reaction in communities large and small was: God forbid something like that should happen here. Bolstered by online registries of convicted sex offenders, towns enacted laws to keep such criminals from living near schools, parks, day-care centers, and bus stops. But many of the estimated 150 Pennsylvania cities and towns with such laws are repealing or reconsidering them after a state Supreme Court ruling in May invalidated one statute.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before Kira Donnachie-Walden was killed Oct. 24, there were already signs the little girl from Clementon was in trouble. She had unexplained bruises. Her pediatrician asked Kira's mother over the summer whether someone tried to choke the 11-month-old. Her 28-year-old father, David Christopher Walden, had a violent criminal past. Individually, these incidents never raised suspicions among Kira's extended family. But taken together after her death, the incidents drew a very clear picture that Kira was in danger, national child-welfare experts say. That no one recognized the signs is not unusual, experts say. Abusers use charm, deception and fear to keep family members from reporting abuse.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a ruling with statewide ramifications, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Thursday invalidated an Allegheny County law that restricted where convicted sex offenders could live, saying the ordinance would banish offenders to "localized penal colonies" with little access to jobs, support, or even their families. The seven justices concluded that the Western Pennsylvania county law was at odds with the state's "Megan's Law," which requires convicted sex offenders across the state to report their residency so that nearby residents can be notified, but does not restrict where offenders can live.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An 18-year-old Cherry Hill high school student pleaded guilty yesterday to violating his probation for a 1997 attempted sexual assault and could serve as many as five years at the New Jersey Training School for Boys at Jamesburg. The teenager said through his attorney, Scott R. Cohen of Haddon Heights, that he was admitting to delinquent behavior and two violations of Megan's Law - failing twice to register with local authorities - during his three-year probation. The admission of delinquent behavior stemmed from a charge of criminal sexual contact leveled against him about three weeks ago, for which he faces trial as an adult.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
LEON DICKSON raped a 12-year-old girl on her way to school. Jerry Barker assaulted a woman with Down syndrome. And Malik Torian molested a 5-year-old boy. The three convicted sex offenders served time behind bars. After their release from prison, they were required to report their whereabouts to state police at least once a year under Megan's Law - for the rest of their lives . They failed to do so. Now, the U.S. Marshals Service is aggressively seeking the fugitives under Operation Guardian, a national effort to capture the 500 most-dangerous unregistered sex offenders in the country.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge, who during the last three years presided over the sentencing of a group of pedophiles with international contacts, yesterday firmly turned aside the latest challenge to Megan's Law. U.S. District Judge Joseph E. Irenas ended a six-hour hearing in Camden by ruling that Megan's Law was constitutional and saying that the country needed it. "The problem of the sexual predator is a serious one," Irenas said. "It is not only a serious problem in New Jersey. It is a serious problem all over the United States.
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 17-year-old Honey Brook girl with a blond ponytail, a shy smile, and a low I.Q. made the perfect rape victim for Paul Dennis Bryson, the prosecutor said yesterday. Deputy District Attorney Elizabeth Pitts told a jury that Bryson, 51, of Honey Brook, made a calculated selection on Jan. 12, when he lured the girl into his car, drove into a wooded area, had sex with her, and kept her with him until the next morning. After three and a half hours of deliberations, the jury found Bryson guilty of all the charges he faced, which included rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and kidnapping.
NEWS
August 17, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A West Grove man will spend nine to 18 years in prison for molesting two young girls, a judge ordered yesterday. After concluding that Carlos Rentas met the definition of a sexually violent predator, Chester County Court Judge William P. Mahon imposed the sentence on the 50 year old. The prison term will be followed by five years' probation. Under the terms of Megan's Law, Rentas must register his address with authorities for the rest of his life. He will also be required to comply with the provisions of community notification.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The home of a township man jailed on a sexual-assault charge was recently spray painted with references to "Megan's Law" and words accusing the man of being a sex offender. Thomas Giordano, 36, a resident of the 1900 block of Graydon Drive, was arrested June 2 and charged with sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl from South Philadelphia. He remains in Camden County Jail on $20,000 bail. The girl's family had complained to authorities that Giordano assaulted her several times during the last two years, said Detective Lt. Richard Tomlinson of the Cherry Hill Police Department.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's public defenders have again asked the courts to block the state from implementing a part of Megan's Law that requires community notification about where convicted sex offenders live and work. The state had received the go-ahead from a U.S. district judge to start the notification process at noon Tuesday - if the defender's office did not appeal. And the attorney general's office was prepared to begin community notification on as many as several hundred convicted sex offenders.
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NEWS
September 13, 2012
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania prosecutors asked a judge Wednesday for a hearing to determine whether convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky should be designated a sexually violent predator under the state's version of Megan's Law. The Attorney General's Office filed a document saying that it wanted the classification for Sandusky and asking for the hearing before Senior Judge John M. Cleland. Chief Deputy Attorney General Frank Fina said prosecutors would rely on the testimony of an official with the state Sexual Offenders Assessment Board.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - More than a month after Jerry Sandusky was arrested on child-molestation charges, a new law went on the books yesterday, expanding the state's institutional sexual-assault offense. Flanked by lawmakers and state troopers, Gov. Corbett signed the bill to revise the state's version of Megan's Law and bring the state into compliance with federal sex-offender registration standards. "We can hope that by making our laws tougher, we can spare others the pain and grief that has visited too many families," Corbett said.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legislation to toughen Pennsylvania's sex offender laws will be signed by Gov. Tom Corbett in Harrisburg this morning. By expanding reporting requirements for convicted sex offenders, Pennsylvania will become the 15th state in compliance with the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. That federal law was named for the boy whose aduction and murder in 1981 led his father, John, to become the longtime host of the Fox TV show America's Most Wanted . The connection is why the legislation, which toughens the state's "Megan's Law," has been called "the Adam Walsh Bill.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Judge too friendly? State prosecutors are asking a judge to reconsider a ruling to suppress evidence in the case of a Philadelphia lawmaker suspected of drunken driving. The request filed Monday stems from a DUI charge against state Rep. Cherelle Parker. Municipal Judge Charles Hayden earlier this month decided to suppress evidence from two police officers who stopped Parker on April 30. The judge said the officers' testimony was unreliable. In the court filing, Deputy Attorney General John Flannery says he's surprised the judge found the officers less credible than someone who failed an alcohol breath test.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Richard Kanka knocks on a door and introduces himself as a candidate for New Jersey Senate, he's often greeted with the same question: "Are you Megan's dad?" In 1994, Kanka's 7-year-old daughter was raped and strangled by a previously convicted sex offender who lived across the street. He lured Megan inside with the promise of a puppy. Megan's Law, which requires sexual predators to register their addresses to inform neighbors of their crimes, is named for her. Now Kanka, a plumber, pipe fitter, and political neophyte, is the Republican candidate in the 14th Legislative District, an area in central New Jersey where races are arguably the most competitive and often the most expensive in the state.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Will the courts' rollback of Megan's Law residency restrictions make communities less safe from sex offenders?
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When 7-year-old Megan Kanka was raped and murdered by a neighbor, a twice-convicted child sex offender, the reaction in communities large and small was: God forbid something like that should happen here. Bolstered by online registries of convicted sex offenders, towns enacted laws to keep such criminals from living near schools, parks, day-care centers, and bus stops. But many of the estimated 150 Pennsylvania cities and towns with such laws are repealing or reconsidering them after a state Supreme Court ruling in May invalidated one statute.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County man was sentenced to 20 to 40 years in prison Monday for failing three times to register his address in compliance with Megan's Law - a very stiff sentence by recent standards. Evan Davis, 54, of Chester, is accused of cutting the throat of a 23-year-old woman who lived in the same rooming house while he was trying to assault her. He faces a criminal trial on those charges in October. The victim survived. During the investigation into the assault, police discovered Davis did not let probation officials know he had changed from one address to another in Chester.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware County man was sentenced to 20 to 40 years in prison today for failing three times to register his address in compliance with Megan's Law. Evan Davis, 54, of Chester, allegedly cut the throat of a 23-year-old woman who lived in the same rooming house while he was trying to assault her. He faces a criminal trial on those charges in October. The victim survived. During the investigation into the assault, police discovered Evan's did not let probation officials know he had changed addresses.
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