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Melanoma

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NEWS
August 17, 2000 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Cancer expert Dr. Burton Eisenberg, chairman of the department of surgical oncology at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, was asked about melanoma. Q: What makes melanoma potentially deadly? A: "The problem we face with melanoma is that sometimes, depending on the stage of the disease, it can be fairly aggressive and can metastasize [spread] to the lymph nodes and other organs in the body," Eisenberg said. Q: What's Sen. John McCain's risk of death? A: "My suspicion is that he's had a history of this, and his doctors have been following him pretty closely and given him a thorough dermatological exam every couple of years, and unless they've been neglectful they've picked it up pretty early," Eisenberg said.
NEWS
June 15, 2005 | By MARGARET O. KIRK For the Daily News
THINK OF IT as a "chemical conversation," a backyard, over-the-fence kind of chat between human skin cells with critical messages going back and forth. If something disrupts this conversation, researchers at the Wistar Institute know that the deadliest form of skin cancer, called melanoma, can result. Which begs the question: If the chemical chats are restored, can the spread of melanoma be stopped? Surrounded by skin-tissue cultures and on-going experiments, Wistar professor Dr. Meenhard Herlyn is trying to answer that question.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Phillies Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt revealed Sunday that he had been diagnosed with stage-3 melanoma last summer. Though Schmidt said that he is now cancer-free, the melanoma forced him to undergo radiation and chemotherapy treatments and surgery to remove his lymph nodes. "I'm a lucky man," he said outside the team's training complex. Schmidt, 64, who will join the Phillies' TV broadcast team on Comcast SportsNet for 13 Sunday home games this season, had noticed a discolored blotch of skin on his hand one day in August and, on the spur of the moment, decided to visit his dermatologist.
SPORTS
May 19, 2009 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Johnson has decided the fight for his life needs his full-time attention. The Eagles announced yesterday that their longtime defensive coordinator has taken an indefinite leave of absence as he continues chemotherapy for the cancer that was discovered during the Eagles' playoff run in January. "Jim and I agreed that he needs to concentrate all of his efforts on his recovery," Eagles coach Andy Reid said in a statement. "His health is number one. He's struggling, but he's a tough guy and a true battler.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Sue Russell, For The Inquirer
So far, it is a typical workday. I sit in my office at Chestnut and Seventh on the 15th floor, looking out at the barges on the Delaware River, hoping to finish a few tasks before lunch. My cellphone rings, and it's a return call from the nurse at Jefferson University Hospital. I can tell from her tone that the news is not good. My cancer, a type of melanoma that affects the eye rather than the skin, seems to have spread from my eye to my liver. A biopsy later confirms it. My job is at the American Association for Cancer Research, where, as a nonscientist, I help edit medical journals.
LIVING
June 3, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers, yet many people don't even know its name. When 1,000 adults were asked, "Can you tell me what melanoma is?" half of the men and more than a third of the women did not know. For those who didn't know, melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, though it is highly curable if caught early. The same survey - relesed last month by the American Academy of Dermatology and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Catherine Poole
When I was a junior in high school, my sister bought a sun lamp to tan her face. I wanted to have tanned legs so I could go without pantyhose, so I used the lamp too. I didn't really tan as well as my sister did because I have very fair skin. Twenty years later I paid for my sun-lamp exposure. While pregnant with my son, I found a melanoma, or malignant skin tumor, on my leg. I soon went through extensive surgery, including a skin graft to close the excision. I spent the rest of my pregnancy on crutches wondering whether I might die from this melanoma.
NEWS
October 10, 2008
SEN. McCAIN has chosen Gov. Palin, who is clearly unprepared to be the vice president during such a turbulent, chaotic, and pivotal time. So it's vital that voters know the facts about McCain's health and demand that his medical records be fully released. We have yet to see a full, public release of McCain's medical records. A "release" in May was restricted to about 20 reporters, and they were allowed only three hours to review 1,173 pages. They were not allowed to make copies, consult with medical experts or use cell phones or have Internet access during their review.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | Daily News wire services
PHILADELPHIA Studies: Sunscreens don't deter melanoma A provocative presentation at a science conference yesterday questioned the widely held belief that sunscreens lower the risk of deadly melanoma skin cancer. But specialists still caution against going into the sun without these lotions. Dr. Marianne Berwick, an epidemiologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, said her own study, and a review of other research, offers no convincing evidence that using sunscreens keeps people from getting melanoma.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wallace H. Clark Jr., 73, a dermatologist whose research into moles, freckles and other skin discolorations led to the early identification and treatment of certain forms of skin cancer, died of an aneurysm Friday at his home in Kennebunk, Maine. Dr. Clark, formerly of Strafford, did much of his work on melanoma while at the University of Pennsylvania, where, from 1978 to 1991, he directed the Pigmented Lesion Clinic, which he had founded, and was a professor of dermatology and pathology in the medical school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Sue Russell, For The Inquirer
So far, it is a typical workday. I sit in my office at Chestnut and Seventh on the 15th floor, looking out at the barges on the Delaware River, hoping to finish a few tasks before lunch. My cellphone rings, and it's a return call from the nurse at Jefferson University Hospital. I can tell from her tone that the news is not good. My cancer, a type of melanoma that affects the eye rather than the skin, seems to have spread from my eye to my liver. A biopsy later confirms it. My job is at the American Association for Cancer Research, where, as a nonscientist, I help edit medical journals.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Phillies Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt revealed Sunday that he had been diagnosed with stage-3 melanoma last summer. Though Schmidt said that he is now cancer-free, the melanoma forced him to undergo radiation and chemotherapy treatments and surgery to remove his lymph nodes. "I'm a lucky man," he said outside the team's training complex. Schmidt, 64, who will join the Phillies' TV broadcast team on Comcast SportsNet for 13 Sunday home games this season, had noticed a discolored blotch of skin on his hand one day in August and, on the spur of the moment, decided to visit his dermatologist.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Janelle Robinson used a hair-removal kit from the Home Shopping Network, all she wanted to remove from her birthmark was hair. Three months later, she learned there was something else to remove: melanoma. It spread throughout her left leg, even after four surgeries. Then in March, Robinson joined a clinical trial for the drug lambrolizumab; since then, her tumors have nearly disappeared. "Words can't even express what I felt," Robinson said. "I knew my blessing was coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Martha Waggoner, Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. - A Duke University professor who developed a laser to study melanoma has discovered a new use for the system: uncovering what's underneath artwork without damaging the pieces. Warren S. Warren was at the National Gallery in London, looking at an exhibit on art forgeries, when he realized that the art world used imaging technologies that were 30 or 40 years old. So he began investigating whether lasers could be used to uncover the mysteries underneath layers of paint without damaging the art. So far, the answer is a qualified yes. Warren and others in Duke's Center for Molecular and Biomedical Imaging, which he heads, have discovered they can use Warren's pump-probe laser to create three-dimensional cross-sections of art that let researchers see colors and layers and maybe, at some point, discover the source of materials.
SPORTS
April 2, 2013 | Associated Press
HOUSTON - Jack Pardee, one of Bear Bryant's "Junction Boys" at Texas A&M who went on to become an All-Pro linebacker and an NFL coach, has died at 76, University of Houston spokesman David Bassity said. Bassity said Monday that Pardee's son Ted confirmed the death to him. Pardee's family announced in November that he had gallbladder cancer that had spread to other organs and that he had 6 to 9 months to live. Pardee was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1986.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Tanning faces backlash Teenage girls risking deadly melanoma for a year-round tan have helped spur a global backlash against the tanning-bed industry. Health officials from Brasilia to Sydney are banning tanning salons amid evidence that they cause malignant lesions. Tanning-bed use causes all three types of skin cancer, especially for those under age 25, a study from the University of California, San Francisco, said. Doctors say the work in the British Medical Journal should prompt tougher warnings on ultraviolet radiation-emitting tanning machines, which support $5 billion in U.S. annual economic activity.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Art Carey
Edward Williamson was no sun worshipper. In fact, most of his life he diligently avoided it. "I never saw my father with his shirt off," recalls his daughter Tara Coates. "He didn't enjoy being out in the sun and on the beach. " Adds his son Greg: "He worked indoors all life; his skin was the color of milk. " The one thing that drew him outdoors was golf, a favorite pastime. He wore a hat and covered his arms. The only part of his body that was exposed was the small area of his neck where his golf shirt parted to form a V. And it was there in 2005, when Williamson was 59, that his wife, Adell, noticed a suspicious-looking flat brown patch.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
When Jessica Lilley was 15, she made her debut at a tanning salon. The shopkeeper who had sold her the ivory silk gown that she would wear in a beauty pageant insisted that the blue-eyed blonde would look even more fabulous with a good tan. For the next few days, Lilley kept imagining herself bronzed and beautiful. So, despite her mother's vigorous protests, she headed for the nearest salon. "There were more tanning salons in my town of Belmont, Miss., than there were grocery stores," she says, "so it felt totally normal to me. " People at the pageant complimented Lilley on how healthy and glamorous she looked, as though she had just returned from a beach vacation.
SPORTS
May 26, 2011
Royals' Splittorff dies at 64 Paul Splittorff , 64, the winningest pitcher in Kansas City Royals history and a broadcaster for the team, died Wednesday of complications from skin cancer. The Royals said Mr. Splittorff died at his home in the Kansas City suburb of Blue Springs, Mo. His family said 10 days ago that he had been battling melanoma and oral cancer, the Associated Press reported. "This is a very difficult day for our organization," Royals owner and CEO David Glass told reporters.
SPORTS
March 24, 2011 | Daily News Staff Report
Buddy Ryan hasn't coached in Philadelphia since 1990 yet he still has enormous cachet around here. The former Eagles coach, blustery and wisecracking, captured the heart and soul of the fan base like few have during his 5 years here. Ryan will be in the collective mind of those Eagles fans as he deals with another bout of cancer. His son, Rex, told the New York Daily News yesterday that Buddy was diagnosed "a couple of weeks ago. " Rex Ryan did not say what kind of cancer his father has. "He's 80 years old, but he's doing great.
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