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Memorabilia

LIVING
February 5, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Black History Month will be marked Feb. 23 in New York with a major sale of works by African American artists, including several with Philadelphia ties. But earlier there will be another auction of local historic significance: the liquidation of Richman's Ice Cream in South Jersey's Salem County. The company's huge white art deco building near the intersection of Route 40 and Kings Highway, a few miles east of the Delaware Memorial Bridge, had long been not only a landmark but also a mecca for motorists who would go there to get the freshly produced ice cream that was distributed throughout the region.
LIVING
January 22, 2010 | By Sherry L. Howard FOR THE INQUIRER
The posters all started with an image of a red-shirted, cowboy-hatted Bill Pickett. Larry Richards had been offering his black film festival at the West Philadelphia library branch for about four years when a friend came in with an art poster of the smiling black cowboy from the 1923 race film The Bull-Dogger. He wondered if Richards would like to display it. A black movie poster? That was something new to Richards. "He just became immediately taken with the art," Beverly Richards said of her husband, who was an artist.
SPORTS
November 13, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Much of the memorabilia Curt Flood's widow will sell at a Louisville auction tomorrow remains painful for Philadelphians to contemplate. There is his white-gold World Series ring from 1964, the year the Phillies' historic collapse gave his Cardinals the pennant. There are trophies and awards that remind us how good a player Philadelphia lost when Flood, setting in motion the legal fight that would topple baseball's reserve clause and trigger free agency, refused his 1969 trade here.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a moment of low drama, but in the hands of one Robert "Bobby" Bonds Jr., the humble white sphere at the center of it all was about to become a precious artifact. Seconds earlier, the object in question had left the hand of Phillies pitcher Cole Hamels, met the bat of Todd Helton, and dribbled all of 30 feet down the first-base line, just far enough to give the Colorado Rockies their first run of the game and first lead of the playoff series. After the play, the ball boy retrieved the ball and handed it to Bonds, seated in a folding chair next to the Phillies dugout, close enough to manager Charlie Manuel to see the lines on his neck.
SPORTS
October 6, 2009 | By KERITH GABRIEL, gabrielk@phillynews.com
If you missed your chance to bid on Lenny Dykstra's 1986 Mets World Series ring, redemption now comes by way of Darren Daulton's 1997 Marlins World Series gem. Yesterday, STAT Authentic LLC announced that the former Phillies catcher plans to liquidate roughly 100 items at the Coach's Corner Sports and Celebrity Auction beginning in mid-November and ending Dec. 4. Daulton's agent, Tony Perri, recently contacted the Abington-based brokerage company,...
SPORTS
September 14, 2009 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
No respect for Marlins rookie Florida's Chris Coghlan got to the majors less than three years after being drafted out of college, got off to a rough start, then found his stride as a leadoff hitter. Now, with a .306 batting average and a .382 on-base percentage, he is a candidate to be named the NL rookie of the year. But there still are bumps along an otherwise seamless road. About two months into his major-league tenure, Coghlan got his first set of personalized bats from Louisville Slugger.
NEWS
August 9, 2009 | By Anne Supsic FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, it's best known as the setting of the quirky TV sitcom The Office, or as Electric City, because it operated the first electric trolley system. But it was daredevil Harry Houdini who lured me here - and he's been dead for 83 years. Now, that's a magic trick. It started as a day trip for my husband, Frank, and myself to explore the Houdini Museum - touted as the only building in the world devoted to the famous escapologist - with our grandson, Christopher, 12. And it expanded to a Weekend Journey a few weeks later, to tour this city of more than 70,000 that's enjoying a cultural renaissance, with historic sites that celebrate the industrial past; glorious, restored buildings; and a vibrant ethnic diversity.
LIVING
April 3, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The April auction schedule opens this weekend with two suburban sales offering unusual and perhaps unique items, and continues with the promise of major activity midmonth - notably the sale by Freeman's of a major private collection of pewter. The first of this weekend's sales takes place tonight at Briggs Auction in Garnet Valley, which, as part of its regular Friday night event, will be offering a single-owner collection of more than 2,000 books related to railroads, as well as railroad memorabilia.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2008 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phans parted with their phunds big time yesterday in a cap/T-shirt/sweatshirt-buying frenzy that looked as if it might set its own record. "It is clearly the single biggest event in the history of our company, which is pretty amazing," said Mitchell Modell, chief executive officer of Modell's, a sporting-goods chain that is 119 years old. Stores opened before daybreak yesterday to lines of championship-starved Phillies faithful eager for...
NEWS
July 22, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a lot of children in the '60s, Mark Suplee was glued to the TV set and Batman. He and his buddies loved anything to do with the Caped Crusader. In his Somerton neighborhood, the boys played with black-and-blue action figures. They raced toy Batmobiles. They washed their hair with shampoo that came in plastic bottles shaped like the Dynamic Duo. Suplee's friends outgrew the fascination with all things Batman. "I didn't," said the 45-year-old Dresher father of two and sales manager for a payroll company.
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