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Memory Loss

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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where did I put the keys? What was her name again? How could I have forgotten that appointment! These, researchers tell us, are some important questions for the '90s and beyond. Because as our population ages and the percentage of people over age 50 grows, the national memory can be expected to slip. In recognition of this, the National Institute of Mental Health officially defined Age-Associated Memory Impairment as a medical condition - and a medical diagnosis - five years ago. There is no doubt that most older people have worse memories than most young people.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | BY DONALD KAUL
A University of Pennsylvania psychologist has found that men's brains shrink and women's do not. Men lose as much as 15 percent of the volume of their frontal lobes over the course of their lives; women, hardly any. This, he says, leads to a steady decline in the ability to concentrate, a loss of reasoning power, a lack of "mental flexibility" and advancing depression. What a load of baloney. I happen to be in my seventh decade and I'm here to say that I'm as sharp as I ever was. My reasoning powers are undiminished, my concentration laser-like and my memory . . . my memory is fine.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years ago, at age 49, Greg Walter felt uncharacteristically forgetful and confused. "I've been able to multitask for years, and all of a sudden, I was not remembering things," recalled the hospital administrator. "I was working off Post-it notes. Until I crossed something off the Post-it, I couldn't be sure what I had done. " He was not, as he initially feared, in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The culprit turned out to be Lipitor, the cholesterol-lowering statin he was taking to prevent heart disease.
SPORTS
April 2, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Floyd Patterson resigned yesterday as New York's athletic commissioner amid reports he was suffering from memory loss so severe he couldn't remember his secretary's name or even the fighter he beat for his first heavyweight title. "After long and careful consideration, my family and I have decided that for personal reasons, I will resign," Patterson wrote in a brief letter to Gov. George Pataki, who appointed him to the post in 1995. The New York Post reported yesterday that a 3 1/2-hour videotape of a deposition Patterson gave two weeks ago shows he could not recall important events in his 64-fight professional career or the names of his closest aides.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As she stood to speak in the Great Hall of Bryn Mawr College's M. Carey Thomas Library yesterday afternoon, graduate student Amanda Adams complained of burning in her sinuses and a headache. They are symptoms she is familiar with, she said. And she also thinks she knows the cause: studying and working in the building. She is not the only one. Shortly after renovation work was begun on cavernous Great Hall in December, students and faculty and staff members say they have been bothered by various ills, from memory loss to respiratory problems.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has ruled that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown is competent to be retried on charges that she defrauded the schools of $6.3 million. Judge R. Barclay Surrick, who presided over Brown's first trial and a competency hearing in January, filed his decision Wednesday. No new trial date has been set. Brown's attorneys had asked the court to find that the 77-year-old career educator had memory impairments that would prevent her from assisting with her defense. Her lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
SPORTS
March 21, 2000 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eric Lindros' visit to a concussion specialist was delayed yesterday because his flight was late in arriving in Chicago. The Flyers' captain was scheduled to meet for a few hours with James Kelly of Northwestern University Medical Center yesterday afternoon. "He never really got to meet with him for any period of time," Carl Lindros, Eric's father and agent, said last night. "They just met briefly. They're going to meet at length tomorrow. " Lindros' treatment records from his stay last week at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia have been forwarded to Kelly.
SPORTS
January 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL OFFICIALS conspired to hide evidence linking concussions to dementia and brain disease, seven retired players charge in the latest lawsuit filed on the subject. The fraud and negligence lawsuit filed here Wednesday accuses the National Football League of publishing nonscientific papers written by biased members of its medical committee, while denouncing valid research that suggested a link. The plaintiffs include former Eagles guards Ron Solt and Joe Panos and defensive back Rich Miano.
SPORTS
February 11, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE LEGALESE in the NFL concussion lawsuits will leave you dizzy. Full of so many therefores and parties-of-the-first-parts, it makes your head spin. Of course, former players affected by CTE feel that way much of the time. CTE stands for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease found in people with a history of head trauma. People like former Eagles quarterback Jim McMahon, who at 55 is suffering from dementia and has admitted he has had suicidal thoughts.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | By Kuae Noel Kelch, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not very often that people attach home computers to their household appliances. But when four electrical-engineering students from Drexel University dabbled with electronic wizardry and connected a Macintosh computer to a host of household items, they designed a system that could help forgetful folks remember, the absent-minded amend their ways and, more important, people suffering from memory loss avoid hazardous household situations....
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NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has ruled that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown is competent to be retried on charges that she defrauded the schools of $6.3 million. Judge R. Barclay Surrick, who presided over Brown's first trial and a competency hearing in January, filed his decision Wednesday. No new trial date has been set. Brown's attorneys had asked the court to find that the 77-year-old career educator had memory impairments that would prevent her from assisting with her defense. Her lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
SPORTS
February 11, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE LEGALESE in the NFL concussion lawsuits will leave you dizzy. Full of so many therefores and parties-of-the-first-parts, it makes your head spin. Of course, former players affected by CTE feel that way much of the time. CTE stands for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease found in people with a history of head trauma. People like former Eagles quarterback Jim McMahon, who at 55 is suffering from dementia and has admitted he has had suicidal thoughts.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THREE MEDICAL experts yesterday offered conflicting opinions on whether charter-school founder Dorothy June Brown is mentally competent to stand retrial. Brown, 77, is accused of defrauding three brick-and-mortar charters and a cyber charter she created of about $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to cover up the alleged activity. A retrial was scheduled after a jury acquitted her on six charges but deadlocked on nearly 50 others. U.S. District Judge R. Barclay Surrick ordered Brown to undergo examination upon request from her defense team.
SPORTS
June 5, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
HARRY CARAY was a man about town. A guy who liked to stop in a local taproom and hoist a few with friends. And, oh, what friends. Chicago Sun-Times columnist Neil Steinberg was recently given access to one of the late broadcaster's diaries in which Caray detailed a stretch during 1972 in which he went barhopping for 288 straight days. Naturally, he wasn't alone. Wilt Chamberlain, Jack Benny, Don Drysdale, Gale Sayers and Jack Dempsey were among his drinking buddies.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Memory loss, cognitive deficits, drops in IQ, and abnormal brain structures: these are but a few of the neurotoxic effects that recent research has correlated to marijuana use in adolescents. But while a number of studies suggest a link between these changes and regular cannabis use, particularly for young teens, there is no definitive evidence that marijuana is entirely to blame. Adolescents who smoke daily, for example, may have problems that predate marijuana use. One thing is certain: pot smoking among American teenagers is on the rise.
SPORTS
November 11, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
To: Charles Eliot, President of Harvard (1869-1909) Re: Banning football Sorry, Charlie. Turns out you and all those other high-collared, high-minded, Gilded Age reformers were right when it came to football. More than a century ago, when you were calling for its prohibition, you better understood the nature of the game than we do today. You saw the grim toll of injury and death and weren't afraid to call the sport "barbaric. " You condemned it as "a fight whose strategy and ethics are those of war. " And, unlike your successors as America's university presidents, you weren't afraid to call for its abolition.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Alzheimer's disease has become the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. In recent years, scientists have ramped up efforts to find a cure. But what about the family members who witness a loved one's memory slowly fading away? Written by award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker, The Geography of Memory makes us keenly aware of the emotional toll of the illness. Walker chronicles the experience of her mother's memory loss. At first, the signs seem insignificant, even odd: An overstuffed freezer full of items she would never ordinarily buy. A desk drawer full of old receipts.
SPORTS
February 3, 2012 | By Donna Spencer, CANADIAN PRESS
At 83, Mr. Hockey is still in demand and on the move. Gordie Howe is about to embark on another series of fund-raisers to support dementia research. It's a personal cause. The disease killed his wife, Colleen, in 2009 and is beginning to affect him. "He's a little bit worse than last year, but pretty close to about the same," son Marty said. "He just loses a little bit more, grasping for words. "The worst part of this disease is there's nothing you can do about it. " While the long-term effects of concussions have been very much in the news lately, the family is hesitant to link the Hall of Famer's condition to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)
SPORTS
January 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL OFFICIALS conspired to hide evidence linking concussions to dementia and brain disease, seven retired players charge in the latest lawsuit filed on the subject. The fraud and negligence lawsuit filed here Wednesday accuses the National Football League of publishing nonscientific papers written by biased members of its medical committee, while denouncing valid research that suggested a link. The plaintiffs include former Eagles guards Ron Solt and Joe Panos and defensive back Rich Miano.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
CARDINAL Anthony Bevilacqua, the retired leader of the Philadelphia Archdiocese, is not a competent witness because of memory loss, and therefore his testimony should be barred, according to attorneys representing one of the priests in the upcoming clergy child-abuse trial. Attorneys for defendant Monsignor William Lynn made their assertions in a motion filed yesterday. It is based on observations made of Bevilacqua during a closed-door deposition on Nov. 28 and 29. Bevilacqua, 88, who suffers from dementia, was unable to identify Lynn, his secretary for clergy from 1992 to 2004, and he struggled "to the point of tears" at his inability to answer questions, the filing said.
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