CollectionsMengistu Haile Mariam
IN THE NEWS

Mengistu Haile Mariam

NEWS
May 24, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cairo Nasser eats weeds. Her eight children eat cactus. Her husband doesn't eat much of anything at all. They live in a grass-and-twig hut about the size of an elevator, its conical roof rising 70 inches from the dirt floor. Their only clothes are on their backs, frayed and grimy. They have no shoes. Scattered about the hut are the family's only possessions: two tin teapots, five water gourds, two rotting baskets, one tin tray, one plastic jug and a metal plate adorned with a bright red rose that's considered too good for everyday use. For more than a month, the 10 of them have lived in this tumbledown camp in Ethiopia's eastern highlands.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Birinesh Kebede boils with anger when she recalls the deaths of her sons 19 years ago during the Ethiopian government's Red Terror campaign. One son, Iskias, 20, was a sailor in the Ethiopian navy. He was accused of subversion and executed in his office, his body buried in an unmarked grave. The other, Dawit, was a 19-year-old student. He was arrested with dozens of young people suspected of opposing the Stalinist regime headed by Mengistu Haile Mariam. Their beaten bodies were dumped in a public square.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | Daily News wire services
UNITED NATIONS IRAN ASSAILED FOR RIGHTS ABUSES A U.N. committee yesterday harshly criticized Iran for its continued high number of executions and tortures, its discrimination against religious minorities and women and its capricious judicial system. The resolution was adopted by a vote of 68-23 with 56 abstentions. A decision by the commmittee, which includes all U.N. members, guarantees a similar outcome in the full assembly next week. The document also expressed grave concern at "continuing threats" to the life of writer Salman Rushdie, who lives in Britain, and those associated with the publication and translation of his novel "The Satanic Verses.
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States said yesterday that emergency food shipments to Ethiopia - where Western relief efforts have been frustrated by war and politics - were being rescheduled in May, June and July. Although State Department spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley cited "port congestion problems, particularly at Assab" as the reason, the Agency for International Development had warned last month that future shipments might be altered if they could not be guaranteed to reach millions of starving people.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Mengistu Haile Mariam yesterday proposed scrapping Ethiopia's hard-line Marxist economic system, adopting some free-market reforms, and giving opposition groups a voice in his government. In a speech to the Central Committee of the ruling Marxist Workers' Party, Mengistu turned his back on more than 15 years of central state planning and conceded that it had been a failure. Mengistu also invited dissident groups to work with him after years of authoritarian one-party rule and said his Worker's Party would rename itself the Democratic Unity Party of Ethiopia.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
Nuclear experts fault Japan SEOUL, South Korea - Japan didn't properly protect its nuclear plants against tsunami risks before the March 11 disaster that caused radiation to spew from the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, a preliminary report by international nuclear experts has concluded. "The tsunami hazard for several sites was underestimated," according to a summary released Wednesday by a U.N. nuclear safety team probing the aftermath of a magnitude-9.0 earthquake that triggered a 50-foot-high wall of water, deluging the plant and causing power outages that caused the disaster to spiral out of control.
SPORTS
March 25, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Olympic marathon gold medalist Mamo Wolde was among 73 people arraigned yesterday in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on charges of participating in mass killings and torture in the 1970s during the military regime. Wolde, 65, the 1968 Olympic champion, has been imprisoned since 1992. He is accused of involvement in the killings of some 2,000 political opponents of Col. Mengistu Haile Mariam from 1974 to 1978. The accused will be asked to enter pleas April 14. Wolde was a captain in the former imperial guard when Mariam overthrew Emperor Haile Selassie in 1974.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | By Eric Shimoli, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the earliest days of African independence in the 1950s and 1960s, new governments across the continent preached and generally observed a strict policy of noninterference in one another's internal affairs as the best way to get along. Because the former colonial powers had carved national borders with so little concern for where different tribes and communities lived, leaders feared that territorial claims from those who had lost some land would become a constant problem. But recent developments in Congo make clear that - for better or worse - a noninterference policy is no longer observed.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than three days, half a million Somali refugees baked in squalid refugee camps in the Ogaden Desert - without water - as Ethiopia collapsed around their ears. Troops of the fallen dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam were fleeing from victorious rebel troops. Food and water convoys were regularly being attacked by soldiers, rebels and ordinary citizens who looked upon them as "moving gold mines" and looted them for water, gasoline, rubber and machine parts. Then, on Saturday, backed by former government soldiers who had switched their allegiance to the triumphant rebels, a convoy of water tankers brought the first relief to the parched camps - 66,000 gallons of water.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the assistance and encouragement of the United States, the leaders of three Ethiopian rebel factions met here yesterday and reached quick agreement on the shape of their country's immediate future. The agreement, announced by Assistant Secretary of State Herman Cohen, leaves the East African nation under the control of the largest rebel group, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front, which overnight had seized the capital, Addis Ababa. Meles Zenawi, leader of the front and now the de facto leader of his country, pledged at a news conference here to abide by the agreement, which calls for the factions to meet again before July 1, this time to establish a more broadly based transitional government.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|