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NEWS
November 28, 1994 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
A giant menorah erected by the Philadelphia Lubavitcher Center at the Judge Lewis Quadrangle across from Independence Hall was illuminated at 4 p.m. yesterday on the first day of Hanukkah, the eight-day Jewish Festival of Lights. Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the Maccabees, a small band of Jews who rebelled against their oppressors in the second century B.C. and defeated the forces of the Greek-Syrian king Antiochus IV.
NEWS
November 28, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
The big phone call came a week ago, out of the blue. Roy Feinberg was wary. "When the call comes - 'the White House' - you think it's a joke," he said. This was no prank. White House staffers on the prowl for a showcase Hanukkah menorah had learned about the eminent Judaica collection at Congregation Rodeph Shalom, the large Philadelphia synagogue where Feinberg is executive director. A flurry of phone calls and faxes later, the staffers had found what they needed. So tomorrow night, when Rodeph Shalom members gather to begin Hanukkah, the eight-day Jewish festival of lights, they won't be lighting the first candle in the big brass menorah they've used for years in their historic sanctuary on North Broad Street.
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | BY CAL THOMAS
The city of Fresno, Calif., which banned Salvation Army public service ads on city buses because they offended two atheists, then restored them following bad publicity, has been outdone by the cities of Santa Ana and Los Angeles in making a mockery of the intentions of the authors of the First Amendment. Having granted a permit to a Jewish group for display of a menorah at a public park, the Santa Ana city attorney revoked it after the American Civil Liberties Union threatened suit.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day after a six-foot menorah was reported missing from a Haddonfield park, the third night of Hanukkah was celebrated as scheduled - with the public lighting of an even bigger menorah. "It's painful," Rabbi Mendel Mangel of Chabad Lubavitch of Cherry Hill said of the apparent theft. But "we are going to respond by adding more good to world," he said. The 18-year-old congregation has placed a menorah at Haddon Avenue and Tanner Street every year for nearly a decade. On Thursday, the congregation lit its new, roughly 10-foot aluminum menorah in the park before more than 50 people.
NEWS
December 4, 2007 | By Steve Netsky
When I called my dad on the first night of Hanukkah a few years ago, I mentioned that we had just lit the menorah and given our daughter her first present. I didn't mention that there was a Christmas tree shining at me from across the living room. My family never was very religious, but we celebrated the holidays - and even though Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday, it looms large for children. My wife isn't very religious either, but, born a Presbyterian, she likes to have a Christmas tree.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day after a six-foot menorah was reported missing from a Haddonfield park, the third night of Hanukkah was celebrated as scheduled - with the public lighting of an even bigger menorah. "It's painful," Rabbi Mendel Mangel, of Chabad Lubavitch of Cherry Hill, said of the apparent theft. But "we are going to respond by adding more good to world," he said. The 18-year-old congregation has placed a menorah at Library Point at Haddon Avenue and Tanner Street every year for nearly a decade.
NEWS
December 3, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, the same sort of menorah decorated the shelves of nice Jewish families everywhere. It had lions. It had the 10 Commandments. And it was green. "It was a green patina that my mother bought in Israel," said Elaine Silverman. "Everyone had one. " No longer. Judaica, and in particular, Hanukkiot - objects specifically used for Hanukkah, which starts Dec. 15 this year - have moved out of the cupboard and into the realm of art. There are dreidels depicting Israeli landscapes.
NEWS
December 19, 1999 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
The Hanukkah wreath - laced in blue and white, adorned with angels in dreidel-print dresses - is a sign. So are the expensive glass Christmas tree ornaments etched with the Star of David. And hot on the Web this year are still more signs: interfaith seasonal greeting cards that, for the first time, blend the symbols of Christmas and Hanukkah. A reindeer has antlers shaped like a menorah. A Santa wears a yarmulke. Perhaps it was inevitable that these signs appeared, that our consumer culture recognized it could exploit the December dilemma by marketing not just to two distinct religious traditions whose holidays occur in the same month, but to a growing number of interfaith couples, individuals with fuzzy ecumenical tastes and businesses eager to appear inclusive.
NEWS
December 21, 2005 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime early yesterday morning, vandals knocked down a four-foot menorah in Bella Vista and stomped on it, an aggressive act that immediately prompted a South Philadelphia community group to construct a new menorah - one that glows brighter than the last one. "This act of hate will not be tolerated," said Vern Anastasio, director of the Bella Vista United Civic Association, the group that put up the menorah and a Christmas tree last week to...
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hanukah. The Festival of Lights. But exactly how much light, and where? When it comes to the menorah, the traditional symbol of the Jewish holiday, religious leaders strongly disagree about how large the eight-branched candelabrum should be, and whether it should be displayed on public property. That disagreement often has centered on the towering menorahs erected throughout the country by members of the Orthodox Lubavitcher movement. Last night, the start of the eight-day celebration of religious freedom, local Lubavitch members kindled the first torch of the 32-foot electric menorah erected on Judge Lewis Quadrangle.
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NEWS
December 22, 2014
ISSUE | HOME TEAM Christie's playing wrong side of field Gov. Christie cannot be elected president, and it isn't because he could not win a Republican nomination battle fought largely on the right. Christie has doomed himself in a general election because no politician whose base of support is in the Northeast could afford to lose Pennsylvania, and no one can win Pennsylvania without faring well in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, where the bulk of the state's voters live.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether the miracle of the first Hanukkah is fact or legend - oil enough for just one day is said to have burned in the Temple lamps for eight - not all Jews agree. But devoutly orthodox Rabbi Abraham Shemtov believes in miracles, and why not? Forty years ago he witnessed a kind of Hanukkah miracle, right on Independence Mall. Better yet, he helped create it, and has watched it spread around the world. On Dec. 14, 1974, Shemtov and four other men of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Judaism gathered on Independence Mall to light what is thought to be the first menorah, or Hanukkah candelabrum, ever illuminated on public property in the world.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
THREE DECADES after the last Jewish congregation in West Philly left for the Main Line, a new one is growing in a neighborhood that once held a vibrant Jewish community of synagogues, shops and, of course, bakeries. Congregation Kol Tzedek's creation story goes back to the mid-2000s, when rabbi-in-training Lauren Grabelle Herrmann began talking up the idea of starting a congregation in the neighborhood. "When I mentioned it, my neighbor on Farragut Street said, 'I have the menorah from the last synagogue in West Philadelphia.' " (That would be Congregation Beth Hamedrosh-Beth Jacob, which was a holdout into the '80s at 60th and Larchwood)
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day after a six-foot menorah was reported missing from a Haddonfield park, the third night of Hanukkah was celebrated as scheduled - with the public lighting of an even bigger menorah. "It's painful," Rabbi Mendel Mangel of Chabad Lubavitch of Cherry Hill said of the apparent theft. But "we are going to respond by adding more good to world," he said. The 18-year-old congregation has placed a menorah at Haddon Avenue and Tanner Street every year for nearly a decade. On Thursday, the congregation lit its new, roughly 10-foot aluminum menorah in the park before more than 50 people.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day after a six-foot menorah was reported missing from a Haddonfield park, the third night of Hanukkah was celebrated as scheduled - with the public lighting of an even bigger menorah. "It's painful," Rabbi Mendel Mangel, of Chabad Lubavitch of Cherry Hill, said of the apparent theft. But "we are going to respond by adding more good to world," he said. The 18-year-old congregation has placed a menorah at Library Point at Haddon Avenue and Tanner Street every year for nearly a decade.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Jewish festival of lights begins at sundown tonight, and some say that to celebrate correctly this year, you might need a bicycle and a bottle of olive oil. That's because Hanukkah, which was a minor star on the celebratory horizon for generations, is being recast - again. And, just as at Hanukkah's 1879 reincarnation, Philadelphians are at ground zero of the shift. Rabbi Arthur Waskow of the Shalom Center in West Mount Airy, who is among the change-seekers, reminds all who will listen that the Hanukkah story is about one day's supply of oil lasting eight days.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Your home, no matter how small or shared its space, is your refuge, your shelter from storms, emotional or physical, that may be raging elsewhere. And the most comforting home is one that reflects your values. This month, whether you set up an evergreen topped with a shining star or a menorah with tapered candles, you are doing far more than decorating. Tonight marks the start of Hanukkah, the eight-day Jewish Festival of Lights. At sundown, when at least three stars can be counted in the night sky, the first Hanukkah candle is lit along with a shamash, or helper candle used to light and stand guard over the rest.
NEWS
December 4, 2007 | By Steve Netsky
When I called my dad on the first night of Hanukkah a few years ago, I mentioned that we had just lit the menorah and given our daughter her first present. I didn't mention that there was a Christmas tree shining at me from across the living room. My family never was very religious, but we celebrated the holidays - and even though Hanukkah is a minor Jewish holiday, it looms large for children. My wife isn't very religious either, but, born a Presbyterian, she likes to have a Christmas tree.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of Atheists Alliance International plans to put up a tree this weekend on the lawn at the Chester County Courthouse to stand beside three traditional holiday displays there. The 20-foot tree will be hung with copies of covers of books, including "Why I Am Not A Christian," "Why I Am Not a Muslim" and "Judaism Beyond God. " This addition to last year's three holiday displays is sponsored by the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia which, its president Margaret Downey said, is "welcoming to agnostics, atheists, humanists, skeptics, rationalists of all kinds.
NEWS
December 21, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thou shalt be more inclusive. In the spirit of the holidays, Chester County - home of the flap over the Ten Commandments - is displaying a welcome mat of sorts, whatever your religious persuasion. The county commissioners agreed to add both a menorah and a Nativity scene to a crowded courthouse lawn, which also features a lighted Christmas tree, a United Way promotion, and two Quaker signs proclaiming: "War is not the answer. " The site is a few feet from the bronze plaque that grabbed national attention after a Pocopson Township woman sued in 2001 to have it removed.
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