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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Randall Cunningham might not be having the best of seasons on the football field, but he is hoping to have a winning season in the fashion field. The Eagles quarterback has joined with 10 other NFL quarterbacks to design a menswear collection of stylish basics. The line is called the QBC Collection (Quarterback Club Collection) and is produced in affiliation with the NFL's marketing division and two sportswear companies. Cunningham, along with Eagles players Fred Barnett and Eric Allen, debuted the collection at John Wanamaker in Center City Tuesday in a top-notch fashion show that left women screaming - not necessarily for the duds, which are nothing to toss out your Armani suit for, but for the Eagles.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Many people are pleased to see the return of the fashionable male. Few are as pleased as Curtis Sisco. In the 1970s, stylish men strolled the streets of Philadelphia and elsewhere sporting "The Sisco Look. " Unknown to some, it was a look inspired and coordinated by Sisco, among the first Philadelphia retailers to prod his customers into not just coordinating colors, but into putting together a total outfit of colors that brought each color out more strongly. "I don't think any single person has been as instrumental in the menswear industry in Philadelphia, or nationwide, as Curtis Sisco," said Mercia Grassi, professor of marketing at Drexel University.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Michael Kors took over a section of Grand Central Terminal to debut his first men's collection, and sent the audience into a tizzy by opening with men and women in his new Kors briefs - attached to dress shirts. Andrew Fezza threw a thrill-a-minute show in a packed downtown warehouse. In his opening, fashion images captured on black-and-white film literally came alive, with models walking through the screen to appear on the runway in four- color glory. His finale featured hard-bodied men dancing in the new body- conscious Fez line.
LIVING
March 20, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Men's fashion this season is on neutral ground. The splashy colors and prints of Gianni Versace aside, most menswear designers went to the fields for earthy tones: wheat, sage, flax, oat, grain, stone, sand and slate. These natural colors soothe the soul, and there are enough new design elements this season to keep neutral from seeming neuter. Suits take on a new silhouette with soft, rounded shoulders, high-button gorges (where the collar meets the lapel) and patch pockets.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three top executives of Today's Man Inc., including the founder, have left their jobs in order to tailor a possible acquisition of the struggling men's fashion retailer. The company, whose stock is traded on the over-the-counter bulletin board, also said yesterday that it had laid off 53 workers at its Moorestown headquarters to cut costs. Today's Man still employs about 900. Yesterday, its stock price fell 4 cents, or 25 percent, to 12 cents. Founder and chairman David Feld; president and chief executive officer Bruce Weitz; and Larry Feld, David Feld's brother and Today's Man's vice president of real estate, were being "temporarily laid off," the company said in a filing with the federal Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
This is the season when the big bets are on three trends that dominate the women's fashion field: Menswear looks. Animal prints. The long skirt - slit up to there! Call it the fashion trifecta. In the world of horse racing, a trifecta is a bet in which one correctly picks the first-, second- and third-place winners of a race. As the local fashion-industry women who served as models for this article know, it takes a real pro to pick the trend that will be the seasonal winner, in addition to the ones that will place and show.
LIVING
February 12, 1996 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
It would be easy now for Tommy Hilfiger to gloat. Here he is, like Jimmy Cagney in White Heat, on top of the world, the fashion world. And all those who laughed and sneered at him 10 years ago when he dared to take out billboards declaring himself the next big menswear designer aren't laughing anymore. Quite the contrary. Retailers and fashion editors were cheering and applauding as Tommy, as everyone calls him, ambled down the runway Tuesday at the conclusion of his men's fall '96 fashion show.
LIVING
February 10, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
It was the ultimate fashion-insider event on Sunday. The thousand or so gathered for the Designer of the Year Awards seemed to appreciate the talent of John Bartlett when he stepped forward, swathed in a winter white ensemble that hugged his physique, to accept the menswear title. They knew, and their warm, sustained applause proved, that the tight-ribbed sweater and seamed sailor pants he wore like a layer of skin were plucked from the hit show he presented a few days earlier, a collection deeply spiritual and overtly sexual.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Menswear is getting manly again. Yes, it appears that designers are moving away from prepubescent male models showing low-rise, flat-front pants paired with brightly striped shirts. Maybe they finally realized that men have waistline issues, too, and simply can't fit into skinny pants. Or maybe they figured out that when men buy new clothes, they actually want to get dressed up - not look all slouchy in khakis and boring white button-downs. Whatever the reason, Fall 2006 Fashion Week began with Kenneth Cole, John Bartlett, Ralph Lauren and Altoona-based designer Michael Wesetly, among others, showcasing suits in spiffy grays and wide plaids, and tonal shirts.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The return of the dinner jacket brings with it a new appreciation of one of menswear's swankiest accessories. The trendlet Lapel pins are undergoing a crafty revival as artisans fashion felt, ribbon, and organza into faux flowers perfect for pinning. This spring, look for the confident and well-coiffed dude to add a dose of petaled, pastel pizzazz to tuxedo jackets and linen blazers. Where's it come from? The boutonniere, of course. And these "buttonhole flowers" go back to the 16th century, when grooms wore them to ward off evil spirits.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The return of the dinner jacket brings with it a new appreciation of one of menswear's swankiest accessories. The trendlet Lapel pins are undergoing a crafty revival as artisans fashion felt, ribbon, and organza into faux flowers perfect for pinning. This spring, look for the confident and well-coiffed dude to add a dose of petaled, pastel pizzazz to tuxedo jackets and linen blazers. Where's it come from? The boutonniere, of course. And these "buttonhole flowers" go back to the 16th century, when grooms wore them to ward off evil spirits.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In a world where ties are increasingly optional - much to the chagrin of menswear purists - snazzy neckwear is a sartorial sign that dandyism still exists.   The trendlet Bow ties in polka dots, zigzags, stripes, and African prints are taking the modern man's suited-up look from OK to worthy of a second glance. Just ask Matthew McConaughey.   Where's it come from? With the advent of suiting in the mid-17th century came cravats - a neck band that tucked into men's formal shirts like handkerchiefs.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Look for plaids - the most classic of menswear patterns - to weave their way through many a daring dandy's wardrobe this late fall into holiday season. For many guys, staid plaids never left their closets. But high fashion's masculine move to funky tartans is twofold: The style world continues to borrow from American heritage. (Nothing says chop-the-firewood-rugged like a plaid flannel button-down. There's even a new term for that look: lumbersexual.) And we've got almost a year under our belts of seeing Savile Row-inspired suiting, perfect for many versions ofthe sturdy, checked patterns.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Villa has been in the hip-hop fashion game since the baggy days of Cross Colors and Fubu. So execs of the retail chain figured if anyone could help designers from "the block" make fashion, they could. In winter 2012, Patrick Walsh, vice president of marketing, launched a contest calling on designers from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and surrounding states to submit their best work. More than 250 entered, and the winner, Khaleel Salaam, 30, saw his collection of men's fitted T's, hoodies, and tanks produced by the Philadelphia-based company.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Cool futuristic looks, courtesy of Drexel University students, sauntered down the run- way at last month's annual senior fashion show. The presentation, held on Urban Outfitters' campus at the Navy Yard, featured amazing examples of the latest in women's wear, menswear, bridal, eveningwear, and children's clothing. Some designs popped, like Kate Murphy's lace shorts. Others sizzled, as in Jaizelle Hanna-Sten- dardo's grouping of silver- tiered eveningwear. Flashes of color were big trends, too, including Yeon Son and Alice Stevenson's menswear.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2011
THERE'S NOT a woman in Philly who would rock a burka just to make a fashion statement. But when it comes to Muslim-inspired menswear, well, that's another story. Regardless of their religious affiliations, certain Philadelphia men, mainly African-Americans, have adopted the style of wearing long, old-world-style beards, sometimes pairing them with calf-length trousers and long shirts - all looks inspired by traditional Muslim attire. For many, this convergence of hip-hop with Islamic style is purely a fashion statement and has nothing to do with whether a guy worships in a church or mosque.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Tiny suits, skinny jeans, and shrunken shirts - hallmarks of the latest ultra-fitted era in men's fashion - are relaxing a bit. And that's not the only news in menswear. When it comes to shopping, guys are slowly breaking their blind loyalties to such traditional menswear outlets as Boyds and Brooks Brothers and branching out, finding style solace in what used to be haunts for just women. Think H&M, Urban Outfitters, Zara, even Ross. "My whole outfit is from Ross," said Jack Soos, 23, clad in a lavender dress shirt and pleated pants, and sipping a hoppy beverage in this week's With Love Beer Garden at the Four Seasons Hotel.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
Bijan Pakzad, 71, the ritzy fashion designer whose by-appointment-only Rodeo Drive boutique is billed as "the most expensive store in the world," died Saturday at a Los Angeles hospital. He had suffered a stroke Thursday. Mr. Pakzad - or simply Bijan, as he preferred to be known - unabashedly promoted the opulence of his glamorous life, his stores, and his clientele. He starred in his own advertisements, appearing on billboards and in magazines beside celebrity clients such as Bo Derek and Michael Jordan, or posing provocatively with nuns and a rabbi or, in one campaign, a model who slapped his face and, in the caption, called him a chauvinist.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Frumpy is the new funky. New York's fall 2011 runways at Lincoln Center were packed last week with conservative looks of longer skirts and button-up blouses. Main Line favorite Tory Burch led the pack with a series of plaid, polka-dot, and pleated dresses with long sleeves and high necks reminiscent of the '70s working girl. Designer Yoana Baraschi featured a long-sleeved tan-and-black polka-dot dress with a high neck and tie - which she called "the librarian. " "People are finally more interested in covering up," Baraschi said at her presentation.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Walking into the Philadelphia Museum of Art's latest fashion exhibition, "The Peacock Male: Exuberance of Masculine Dress," I expected a collection of mostly tailored suits, possibly sprinkled with a hint of color and a dash of dandyism. Instead, I was greeted by a turquoise-sequined peacock costume, courtesy of Philadelphia's Mummers, complete with 12-foot-tall feathers and painted leather shoes. And on the other side of the Joan Spain Gallery was a phenomenal Yohji Yamamoto black wool coat - drab in comparison, until a peek at the lining revealed a silk-screened mermaid with the face of Marilyn Monroe.
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