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Mental Retardation

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NEWS
March 15, 1988 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite its remaining deficit, the city Office of Mental Health and Mental Retardation will not allow any mental-retardation programs to close this fiscal year, according to acting Administrator John M. Ciavardone. Ciavardone made the statement yesterday during a meeting of the Mayor's Mental Health/Mental Retardation Advisory Board. Later, in an interview, Ciavardone said that he planned to send letters to all city providers of mental-retardation services, assuring them that - whether it comes from the state or not - they would have the money to continue operating.
NEWS
November 9, 1986 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Earlier this year, things weren't going too well for John Thomas Jr., Dan Westund and Ricky Curtis. Like many others without specific job skills, these three young men from West Chester were having a tough time finding work. Thomas, 22, is the most outgoing of the three, always ready with a quick comment, joke or complaint. In the summer of 1985, he had held a job cutting lumber at a mill, but was laid off after seven months. Although he hated to be out of work, he didn't miss the job. "That job was a real pain," Thomas said.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
In March, the last of Ella Matthews' 11 children moved out. Six months later, when she might understandably have relished her new freedom and privacy, she invited Rita Walker to move in. Walker, 21, calls the 56-year-old Matthews "Mom" and "Miss Ella," but Walker is no child and Matthews is not her mother. Walker is mildly retarded and lives with Matthews under a contractual arrangement sponsored by Horizon House, a nonprofit agency that helps the mentally retarded, as well as the mentally ill, the homeless and those with drug and alcohol problems.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the cheers of more than 200 mentally retarded people and their families and advocates, City Council yesterday unanimously passed a resolution aimed at easing a budget crisis that threatens to halt mental-retardation services to as many as 1,200 Philadelphia residents. Also yesterday, the first three closings of community mental-retardation programs, which had been scheduled for early next week, appeared to have been temporarily averted with the state's promise Wednesday night to provide $223,000 in emergency funding.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To thousands of people, mentally and retarded are fighting words. For years, people who are mentally retarded, their families, and professionals who work with them have been wrangling over what to call people with IQs below 70. Advocates for change argue that the word retarded - or more often retard - is now a school-yard taunt, a word too hurtful to be applied to people who want and deserve respect. "That's my pet peeve in life," said Roseann Mosakowski, a Pottsgrove woman whose 15-year-old son suffered a brain injury as an infant and now falls into the category.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an infant-stimulation program in Northeast Philadelphia, 16-month-old Megan Murphy, born with Down's syndrome, was going through a series of exercises Thursday designed to teach her how to stand up and, eventually, walk. At a respite-care home on the other side of the city, in Overbrook, Franny Romeo, a 69-year-old mentally retarded woman, sat and counted the money in her purse at the supervised apartment where she moved last year when her sister became too ill to take care of her. Megan and Romeo, though strangers, separated by miles and years, are in the same boat.
NEWS
February 5, 1986 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last year, Kimberly Cusick, a 22-year-old mentally retarded woman, has spent her days at home - "just sitting around and getting bored," her mother says - too old for public schools, unable to afford a private one and not lucky enough to receive the state services to which she is entitled. With her behavioral problems, she has become more than her mother, Elaine, who is divorced and holding a job, could handle at their home in Kensington. She has been on a list to receive services from the county mental retardation office for nearly two years, but county officials have said that there was no money to place her in a group home or other program.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 100 mentally retarded people - some in wheelchairs, some on crutches, some holding the hands of family members and advocates - rallied in front of the State Office Building in Philadelphia yesterday, demanding that the state and city increase funding for mental-retardation programs. "We are human beings, and nobody has a right to take away our homes," Debra Robinson, who has cerebral palsy, said through a bullhorn as a retarded man held her crutches and an advocate helped her stand.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A Commonwealth Court judge yesterday granted the Casey administration eight extra days to come up with $7.5 million for programs for mentally retarded Philadelphians. But rather than ask the legislature for the money, the administration is trying to determine whether it can use funds earmarked for other city services, according to a spokeswoman for the state Department of Public Welfare. "Our priority still remains that we're very concerned about those people that have been locked out of programs," spokeswoman Vicki Smink said.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | By Inga Sandvoss, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The walls in the Atrium Building on West Gay Street in downtown West Chester have never looked better. There, on the second floor, the original works of more than 60 area artists can be viewed and purchased as part of Art '92, an annual art show held to benefit the Association of Retarded Citizens/Chester County chapter (ARC/CC). The show, which opened Sunday, is one of the main fund-raising events for ARC/CC, a group dedicated since 1952 to providing a variety of support and growth programs for people with mental retardation and their families.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jose Alicea is now 26 and has been in prison since age 19 when he confessed to the Oct. 30, 2005, shooting death of 21-year-old Esroy George Rowe during a melee at their neighborhood cafe in Olney. Alicea's attorneys say he confessed not because he was guilty but because his low IQ and lack of experience with police made him especially vulnerable to questioning by authority figures. On Tuesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court took up the pretrial appeal that has delayed Alicea's trial: whether his lawyers may call as a witness a nationally known expert on false confessions.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jose Alicea is now 26 and has been in prison since age 19 when he confessed to the Oct. 30, 2005, shooting death of 21-year-old Esroy George Rowe during a melee at their neighborhood cafe in Olney. Alicea's attorneys say he confessed not because he was guilty but because his low IQ and lack of experience with police made him especially vulnerable to questioning by authority figures. On Tuesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court took up the pretrial appeal that has delayed Alicea's trial: whether his lawyers may call as a witness a nationally known expert on false confessions.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
LINDA ANN WESTON, the accused mastermind behind the sordid captivity of four mentally disabled adults in a Tacony sub-basement, has been ruled mentally competent to face her preliminary hearing next month. Still, her attorneys contend she is mentally handicapped. When a court-ordered psychiatrist asked her to spell "cat," she couldn't, George Yacoubian, one of her attorneys, told reporters after a court hearing yesterday. When asked "who the president was, she said, 'Bush,' " Yacoubian said.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Tracie Mauriello, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
HARRISBURG - Lawmakers are awaiting release of an audit that they hope will explain how the state Department of Public Welfare approved payments for chandeliers, a home bowling alley, and other seemingly extravagant items with funds meant to provide health care and employment support for Pennsylvanians with intellectual disabilities. Those expenditures - as well as state payments on home mortgages, luxury cars, and flea-dipping for a therapeutic cat - came to light during a Senate Health and Welfare Committee hearing this week.
NEWS
September 23, 2011 | By Elizabeth Lopatto, Bloomberg News
Bioethicist Art Caplan said his challenge to Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann for proof that a vaccine to prevent cervical cancer caused mental retardation ended without Bachmann acknowledging it. Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, offered to pay $10,000 to a charity of Bachmann's choice if she could find such a person by noon Thursday. Bachman said in television interviews on Sept. 13 that a woman told her that the shot, usually given at age 12, triggered mental retardation in the woman's daughter.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Presidential aspirant Michele Bachmann has a history of being gaffe-prone, but her latest remarks so angered University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan that on Thursday he challenged her to put up or pipe down. Bachmann told Fox News and NBC's Today show this week that she had heard from a distraught mother whose daughter "suffered mental retardation" from taking the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine. Bachmann's statement has been denounced by the American Academy of Pediatrics, advocates for the disabled, and public-health experts.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Presidential aspirant Michele Bachmann has a reputation for being gaffe-prone, but her latest comments so incensed University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan that he has challenged her to put her money where her mouth is. Bachmann told Fox News and the Today Show earlier this week that she had heard from a distraught mother whose daughter "suffered mental retardation" as a result of receiving the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine....
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Dante Anthony Fuoco, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lady Gaga said the word when her song "Born This Way" was labeled a Madonna rip-off. LeBron James muttered it in May after a reporter posed a question to a teammate. The word got Tracy Morgan in trouble last month, and was used nearly 20 times in the 2008 film Tropic Thunder , to the discontent of some. And on the heels of legislation by other states and Congress, Pennsylvania is poised to remove the word from its legislative lexicon. Retarded - derived from mental retardation , once a sterile, clinical term for a person with intellectual disabilities - is increasingly considered a demeaning description and hurtful verbal jab. So is retarded - "the 'R' word," as some now say - a slur?
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