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Menthol

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NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suppose Nike thinks it can sell more sneakers to young black men by using advertisements showing basketball footage. Or Tasty Baking Co. thinks more African Americans will buy its Butterscotch Krimpets if it uses a gospel-music version of its well-known jingle. No harm done, right? It makes good marketing sense to figure out how to sell a product to whatever group is likely to buy it, and then target that group. The idea is at the heart of advertising, marketing and sales. But what if the product is harmful?
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday dismissed a novel lawsuit filed last year that contended the tobacco industry violated the civil rights of African Americans by targeting black communities for the sale of what it called more dangerous menthol cigarettes. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova ruled that federal civil rights laws do not bar tobacco product manufacturers from targeting a specific group of potential consumers - in this case African Americans - in their advertising and marketing campaigns.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do black smokers prefer more dangerous mentholated cigarettes, or has that taste been seeded and nurtured by the tobacco industry through targeted advertising? This thorny version of the chicken-and-egg conundrum was put to a panel of federal appeals judges yesterday. The jurists were being asked to reinstate a dismissed class-action civil-rights suit filed against the tobacco industry by black smokers. "Out of the population, African Americans are less than 10 percent," lawyer William R. Adams Jr. told the three judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit contending that tobacco companies violated the civil rights of African Americans by purposely marketing what the suit calls more-dangerous menthol cigarettes in black communities has been filed in federal court in Philadelphia. The proposed nationwide class-action suit, filed Monday against 12 tobacco companies or industry groups, is believed to be the first suit against the tobacco companies on behalf of African Americans. It is also, lawyers say, the first lawsuit to use the approach of suing tobacco companies under federal civil-rights law rather than personal-injury or product-liability statutes.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
An organizer of a coalition whose protests helped stop plans to test a new cigarette among black smokers in the city said yesterday that the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. should re-examine its marketing approach. "I think they will learn that this kind of marketing technique is not something communities like," said Pastor Jesse Brown, president of the Committee to Prevent Cancer Among Blacks. Another coalition member, John Dodds, director of the Philadelphia Unemployment Project, said that the tobacco company's attempt to create a cigarette specifically for black smokers was "just another way of exploiting the inner city.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009
Vieux Carré gives new meaning to the notion of drinking "green. " Sure, the name and the ornately decorated square bottle are a nod to New Orleans, the historic seat of absinthe in America during the Belle Époque. But this latest entry in the red-hot revival of absinthe is as fresh and local as it gets - released last month by the distillers of Bluecoat gin in Northeast Philadelphia. Echoing Bluecoat's highly aromatic take on gin, Vieux Carré pushes the herbal envelope - even for absinthe - with so much natural chlorophyll in the coarsely-filtered liquor that it looks like milky pondwater when mixed with a sugar cube and cool water.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Staff writer Rose DeWolf and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ODOR ORDER: R.J. Reynolds, the tobacconists who bombed with the smokeless, foul-tasting "Premiere" brand in the late '80s and the minority-targeted public relations disaster "Uptown" a while back, has a new idea. Starting this month on military bases, they'll be selling "Salem Preferred," a menthol that is supposed to stink less than the average butt. There are a few potential problems here, the Wall Street Journal reports: There could be criticism, a la "Uptown," that the introduction of a new menthol, the kind of cigarette known to be preferred by black and Latino smokers, is a concerted attempt to undermine their health.
NEWS
January 21, 1990
A funny thing happened to Uptown, the hip, new menthol cigarette that R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. was going to test-market among black smokers in Philadelphia. The company was getting everything just right for a Feb. 5 test burn - the media blitz, the just-right packaging, the demographics. Except this time people got mad. They ambushed Uptown on its way into town. By late Friday, R.J. Reynolds knew the PR war was lost. It canceled the test-marketing in Philadelphia, saying the new brand was getting "unfair and biased attention.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | By Susan Estrich
It's hard to argue with the Food and Drug Administration's decision to ban the sale of flavored cigarettes. To be honest, I always thought cigarettes came in regular and menthol, not chocolate and strawberry. The legislation passed earlier this year giving the FDA authority over tobacco products authorized it to ban flavored cigarettes, while protecting the kind I got hooked on. The justification for the ban is that the cigarette companies have been using kiddie flavors, as they've used cartoon characters, to appeal to teenagers.
NEWS
June 12, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tobacco-control movement celebrated another milestone yesterday as the U.S. Senate easily passed a bill giving the government unprecedented power over the making and marketing of tobacco products. Supporters say the law will enable the Food and Drug Administration to protect children from the addictive lure of cigarettes, make tobacco products safer, and, ultimately, save some of the 400,000 lives lost annually to tobacco-related illness. "For four or five decades, tobacco companies have preyed on our children . . . knowing they'd get addicted at a young age," said Richard J. Durbin of Illinois, the Senate's second-ranking Democrat.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Brady Dennis, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration said for the first time Tuesday that menthol-flavored cigarettes appear to pose a greater risk to public health than standard cigarettes, largely reaffirming the findings of an agency advisory committee two years ago and potentially laying the groundwork for tighter regulations. In a 153-page "preliminary scientific evaluation," the FDA found that although there is "little evidence" to suggest that menthol cigarettes are more toxic than non-menthol cigarettes, the mint flavor of menthol masks the harshness of tobacco, making it easier to get addicted and harder to quit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
D AILY NEWS readers really identified with last week's column on my personal struggles with sugar addiction. Specifically, inquiring minds wanted to know precisely what I did to overcome, or should I say "manage," my addiction to the sweet stuff. Well, here are the juicy details. Initially, I gave up sugar COLD TURKEY - the same way I gave up cigarettes! Surprised? That's right, I was a cigarette smoker. Generations of women smoked in my family, so quite naturally I took up this bad habit, too. Despite the warning on the label, I was convinced in my youth that there must be something wonderful about smoking - otherwise, why would my mother and grandmother be doing it?
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | By Susan Estrich
It's hard to argue with the Food and Drug Administration's decision to ban the sale of flavored cigarettes. To be honest, I always thought cigarettes came in regular and menthol, not chocolate and strawberry. The legislation passed earlier this year giving the FDA authority over tobacco products authorized it to ban flavored cigarettes, while protecting the kind I got hooked on. The justification for the ban is that the cigarette companies have been using kiddie flavors, as they've used cartoon characters, to appeal to teenagers.
NEWS
June 12, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tobacco-control movement celebrated another milestone yesterday as the U.S. Senate easily passed a bill giving the government unprecedented power over the making and marketing of tobacco products. Supporters say the law will enable the Food and Drug Administration to protect children from the addictive lure of cigarettes, make tobacco products safer, and, ultimately, save some of the 400,000 lives lost annually to tobacco-related illness. "For four or five decades, tobacco companies have preyed on our children . . . knowing they'd get addicted at a young age," said Richard J. Durbin of Illinois, the Senate's second-ranking Democrat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009
Vieux Carré gives new meaning to the notion of drinking "green. " Sure, the name and the ornately decorated square bottle are a nod to New Orleans, the historic seat of absinthe in America during the Belle Époque. But this latest entry in the red-hot revival of absinthe is as fresh and local as it gets - released last month by the distillers of Bluecoat gin in Northeast Philadelphia. Echoing Bluecoat's highly aromatic take on gin, Vieux Carré pushes the herbal envelope - even for absinthe - with so much natural chlorophyll in the coarsely-filtered liquor that it looks like milky pondwater when mixed with a sugar cube and cool water.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do black smokers prefer more dangerous mentholated cigarettes, or has that taste been seeded and nurtured by the tobacco industry through targeted advertising? This thorny version of the chicken-and-egg conundrum was put to a panel of federal appeals judges yesterday. The jurists were being asked to reinstate a dismissed class-action civil-rights suit filed against the tobacco industry by black smokers. "Out of the population, African Americans are less than 10 percent," lawyer William R. Adams Jr. told the three judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday dismissed a novel lawsuit filed last year that contended the tobacco industry violated the civil rights of African Americans by targeting black communities for the sale of what it called more dangerous menthol cigarettes. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova ruled that federal civil rights laws do not bar tobacco product manufacturers from targeting a specific group of potential consumers - in this case African Americans - in their advertising and marketing campaigns.
FOOD
August 1, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
For those familiar with the sour pungency of low-grade sake, usually served hotto mask its flaws, a sip of a premium-quality brew served cold might be a revelation to crave in the summer. Though novices like me will inevitably have difficulty at first detecting some of the subtleties in this usually crystal clear, generally lean alcohol, the more one tastes the more one realizes that the universe of sakes is filled with an incredible variety of complex flavors. Sakes can be dry and crisp, sweet and milky, or assertively sour or bitter.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suppose Nike thinks it can sell more sneakers to young black men by using advertisements showing basketball footage. Or Tasty Baking Co. thinks more African Americans will buy its Butterscotch Krimpets if it uses a gospel-music version of its well-known jingle. No harm done, right? It makes good marketing sense to figure out how to sell a product to whatever group is likely to buy it, and then target that group. The idea is at the heart of advertising, marketing and sales. But what if the product is harmful?
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit contending that tobacco companies violated the civil rights of African Americans by purposely marketing what the suit calls more-dangerous menthol cigarettes in black communities has been filed in federal court in Philadelphia. The proposed nationwide class-action suit, filed Monday against 12 tobacco companies or industry groups, is believed to be the first suit against the tobacco companies on behalf of African Americans. It is also, lawyers say, the first lawsuit to use the approach of suing tobacco companies under federal civil-rights law rather than personal-injury or product-liability statutes.
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