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Mercer Museum

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NEWS
December 2, 1993 | For The Inquirer / BILL CAIN
Carl Soupik (left) and John Tedrick work on the roof at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown. Various techniques for repelling moisture and preventing deterioration are being used by the Joseph Dugan Co. on a test patch of the 75-year-old roof. The method that works best will then be used on the concrete roof, one of the many unusual uses of the material made by Henry Mercer.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Henry Chapman Mercer's zeal for preserving pre-industrial American artifacts led to his creation 75 years ago of the Mercer Museum in Doylestown. The museum is celebrating its anniversary Sunday with an afternoon festival saluting Mercer and his unique vision. More than 50,000 artifacts of early American life, ranging from a whale boat to shoemaking tools, are on display at the museum. A new exhibit will debut Sunday during the festival. "What Is This Place, Anyway?" will answer visitors' most frequently asked questions about the museum.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To appeal to children, the Mercer Museum has added six new hands-on stations in the midst of its 50,000 early American artifacts. Children can touch, try on or build at the various locations to get a sense of daily life in the 18th and early 19th centuries. "We had known for a long time we needed to do more for family audiences. The portion of our visitation by families with children has increased, mirroring the demographics of Bucks County," said curator Cory Amsler. "We knew we had to address that audience.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Forget the Hustle, the Soul City Walk or even the Electric Slide. Here is your chance to dance the Yearning Saunter or St. Bernard's Waltz. The Mercer Museum in Doylestown is presenting an evening of Victorian dancing and adult amusements on Saturday as a promotion for its current exhibit "Pic Nics and Promenades: Victorian Social Life in Bucks County. " Dancers from the Jamison Dance Academy will be elegantly outfitted in Victorian garb as they demonstrate the "Yearning Saunter" and other dances of the era. Miriam Ellis, director and founder of the dance academy, said the Yearning Saunter was actually the predecessor of the fox trot.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 20 years ago, a friend showed James Wiley a cast-iron toy he had unearthed at a dump. The child in Wiley took over, and since then he has collected toys, banks, board games, cars and trucks - more than 2,500 of them. He explained that one reason he has them spread throughout his Langhorne home is that he enjoys sharing them with others. He gets a chance to do that at the Mercer Museum, which is continuing its exhibit from Wiley's collection today and tomorrow. About 30 playthings from the 1880s to 1920s are on display at the museum.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It could be tossed in the back of the toolbox or buried under boxes in a grandparent's attic. That widget or gadget or whatchamacallit that's been shoved aside, replaced by cordless drills and compound miter saws. Although the tools have outlasted their usefulness, they are by no means worthless. On Saturday, the Mercer Museum plans to demonstrate the significant role these everyday tools played in U.S. history at its Antique Tool Discovery Day. Experts will be on hand to identify tools, estimate their age and demonstrate how they were used.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Suspended from the ceilings and walls of the Mercer Museum are 50,000 artifacts and tools offering clues to what life was like in 18th- and 19th- century America. On Saturday evening, visitors will roam through the rooms and alcoves of the fortresslike structure looking for written clues - clues that will take them up and down the museum's six levels as they compete in a challenging scavenger hunt. "February is a dull, boring, awful month. We planned this to have some fun in the museum," said Julia Sefton, director of education for the Bucks County Historical Society, which administers the museum in Doylestown Borough.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fay Overly of Quakertown said a personal interest brought her to the colonial shoemaking demonstration at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown on Saturday. "A lot of my ancestors were cordwainers (shoemakers)," said Overly, who brought her 30-year-old daughter, Beth, to see the demonstration. "I wanted to get an idea of what they actually did. " The presentation was part of a continuing early American craft exhibit at the museum. It features a different demonstration each weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Spring has arrived. Tonight, the Mercer Museum in Doylestown will celebrate spring with April Appetites, an evening of continuous family activities. Youngsters can visit a circa-1800 log cabin and watch demonstrations of bread-baking in a squirrel tail oven, plus butter-churning, open-hearth cooking and peeling apples with a replica of an 18th-century peeler. Inside the museum, which has more than 50,000 tools and artifacts illustrating life in the pre-industrial era, there will be a family sing-along to live banjo and guitar music.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wanted: Old uniforms, balls, programs, track shoes, golf clubs, fishing gear, awards, photographs. Be it for recreational or competitive use, if it has to do with sports, your memento could wind up in a display case at the Mercer Museum. The museum is planning a fall exhibit on the history of sports in Bucks County and is counting on the residents of Bucks County to deliver the goods - sporting goods, that is. On three Saturdays in April, the museum staff will travel to local libraries, where residents can bring in sports-related items from 1850 to the present.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
In the lobby of the Mercer Museum in Doylestown, five tall-case clocks stand at attention. They're beautiful examples of craftsmanship, sure, but they represent something more: the notion that almost any object we bring into our homes can have rippling effects. "The idea of the importance of time in governing human activity really started taking off in the 18th century, as people had more access to timekeeping devices," said Cory Amsler, the museum's curator. A tall-case clock, for those who could afford it, altered the very rhythm of people's lives.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Gettysburg also will be the topic for historians Ted Widmer, Sean Wilentz, Carla Petersen, and Adam Goodheart at 6:30 p.m. June 17 at the National Constitution Center. At the Rosenbach Museum and Library an exhibit called "Voices of 1863 - Witnesses to the Civil War" reports on the year's events through the letters and dispatches of President Lincoln, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, and others. The event extends through Jan. 5. At Laurel Hill Cemetery, a recreation of the 1868 Decoration Day service of the Grand Army of the Republic will be held at noon on May 26. Bronze markers will be dedicated at the graves of Civil War veterans.
NEWS
April 27, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost a year to the day after Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, a majority of Bucks County voters cast their ballots for his opponent in the 1864 presidential election, Democrat George S. McClellan. Lincoln won Pennsylvania by 52 percent but was outpolled in Bucks County, 7,235 to 6,197 - indicating that many there favored ending the war, according to Cory Amsler, vice president for collections at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown. The history of Bucks County during the Civil War, Amsler surmised, "is not all neat and tidy.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Bruce Katsiff remembers being asked, sometime around 1990, by the board president of the James A. Michener Art Center if he would be interested in running the organization, which had recently opened on the site of the former Bucks County prison in Doylestown. To that point, Katsiff had been chair of the fine art department, and more recently the art and music division, at Bucks County Community College since 1975. He was ready for a change but, as he remembers, "I had no interest in running an arts center.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Nothing separates architects from the rest of humanity like concrete. Architects will go into raptures over its tough, tactile quality. But among the general public, who tend to associate the material with no-frills highways and bad public housing, concrete buildings evoke a visceral dislike. Maybe attitudes would be different if more people encountered Doylestown's Mercer Museum, a quirky French chateau formed entirely of concrete, window frames and roof included. Henry Mercer, the anthropologist, tile maker, and amateur architect who designed the improbable Bucks County castle in 1916, chose concrete for the most practical of reasons: He needed a fireproof building to house his astounding collection of wooden tools.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since 1916, every nook and cranny of Henry Mercer's seven-story Doylestown museum - including the concrete walls and ceilings - have been crammed with 50,000 artifacts of life in pre-industrial America. There's everything from a whale boat to baby carriages, wagons to apple peelers. And yet, Mercer's eclectic collection overflowed into a warehouse and a gallery, with little chance of being seen - until Saturday, with the opening of a $12.5 million, 13,000-square-foot wing. Following the playing of bagpipes, the firing of flintlocks, and the ceremonial ribbon-cutting, more than 100 adults and children streamed into the new exhibition gallery and Learning Center on South Pine Street.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Luke Tigue, 59, of Center City, owner of an architectural lighting consulting firm, died of a heart attack Sunday, June 12, at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Tigue had been owner and master designer of Tigue Lighting in Philadelphia since 1987. The firm had clients from Colorado to Maine, said business manager Debbie Rose Fusco. Local design projects included the Brasserie Perrier, Susanna Foo, Striped Bass, and Manayunk Brewing Co. restaurants, and the Salvation Army Kroc Community Center in East Falls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Aubrey Whelan
Friday Biking to the theater About 36,000 Philadelphians commute to work by bike - and the Arden Theatre, 40 N. Second St., is set to reward them this weekend. As part of Philadelphia's first Bike to the Theatre Night, theatergoers who ride their bikes to the theater for Friday's 8 p.m. performance of Stephen Sondheim's Pulitzer Prize-winning musical Sunday in the Park With George will receive two-for-one tickets and free valet bicycle parking provided by Neighborhood Bike Works.
NEWS
November 7, 2006
The Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance will hold a series of town meetings to discuss the impact of the local cultural sector on the region with area residents. Findings from its recent report, "Portfolio," will be presented. The meetings are: Nov. 16: 8:30 a.m., Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Media. Nov. 21: 3 p.m., Main Line Art Center, Old Buck Road and Lancaster Avenue, Haverford. Nov: 27: 2 p.m., Mercer Museum, Elkins Gallery, 84 S. Pine St., Doylestown.
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