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NEWS
December 17, 2006 | Inquirer staff
Honorably discharged U.S. Merchant Marine veterans of World War II who live in Pennsylvania have until Dec. 31 to apply for a one-time $500 cash bonus. Nearly 900 applications have been approved so far, according to Maj. Gen. Jessica L. Wright, the state's adjutant general. Those eligible must have served on active duty, including training, in the Merchant Marine between Dec. 7, 1941, and Aug. 15, 1945; possess a DD Form 214 proving honorable service; and be a legal resident of Pennsylvania as of April 12. Applications (DMVA-MM-Form 1)
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James L. Fulton Sr., 71, a retired Merchant Marine captain who in the 1980s commanded the Atlantic, then the largest supertanker in the Western Hemisphere, died of heart failure Saturday at Shore Memorial Hospital in Somers Point, N.J. Capt. Fulton lived in the Poconos and previously in Springfield for more than 30 years. He also maintained a home in Somers Point. He was born in Oxford, and raised there and in Philadelphia. He graduated from West Philadelphia High School and at age 17 joined the Merchant Marine, serving about 10 years.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert P. McKeever, 84, a tanker ship captain who spent most of his life at sea as a merchant marine, the owner of a maritime detective agency, and the head of a coal cogeneration firm, died May 14 of multiple systems atrophy, a neurological disease, at home in Center City. Mr. McKeever grew up poor in East Falls; his father was a vegetable huckster and his mother told fortunes by reading tea leaves from the step of their rowhouse. The youngest of four children, Mr. McKeever, like his brothers, went to sea and worked on a tanker after dropping out of the 10th grade.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry Bowdle Stewart, 74, a silver-haired Main Line executive who owned a cattle ranch in New Mexico and loved to hunt big game in Africa, died Sept. 18 at the Abilene Regional Medical Center in Abilene, Tex. "He was dynamic, funny and colorful," said his son, Henry J. "He was like a big truck moving across the desert, kicking up a huge dust cloud behind him. " At his home in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Stewart "used to watch squirrels and deer and woodchucks," his son said. "He was absolutely crazy about animals.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | BY RAY SMITH
It's about time that merchant seaman who "shipped out" during World War II were given recognition for their services and sacrifice. Please understand that they are not asking for a parade, a monument or pity. But they do ask you to remember, in your own way, the thousands of merchant sailors who were killed, listed missing after sinkings or were injured for life. Many others were captured. Merchant seaman were often seen, for example, as "draft dodgers" who sought to avoid "real combat.
SPORTS
March 6, 1998 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sean Bradley walked into Esbjornson Gym with a 21-point scoring average and walked out thankful he did not have to play against B.J. Johnson and Brian Bouchard every day. The Rowan duo held Bradley to six points last night, helping the Profs to a 70-49 victory over the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in the opening round of the NCAA Division III Atlantic Region men's basketball tournament. The third-seeded Profs (20-7), who got 27 points from Rob Scott, will play a second-round game at first-seeded College of New Jersey tomorrow at 7 p.m. It is the third meeting in 24 days between the teams, and CNJ beat Rowan in the New Jersey Athletic Conference final Saturday.
NEWS
April 7, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Davenport, 81, a University of Pennsylvania professor who designed the Pacific section of the school's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology , died March 12 of leukemia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. The peripatetic Mr. Davenport lived in Germantown, Society Hill, Manayunk and North East, Md., during the years he taught at Penn. Mr. Davenport was born and raised in Cucamonga, Calif., and in 1939 studied art and photography for a year at the Art Center School in Los Angeles before joining the U.S. merchant marine.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Giglio, 83, of Delanco, a former maritime executive in Philadelphia who helped establish cross trade with Russia in the 1980s, died of pneumonia Friday, May 21, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly. After serving for 10 years in the Merchant Marine, Mr. Giglio fell naturally into the shipping business. The New England native settled in Riverside in 1955 and started working for Mathiasen Tanker Industries in Philadelphia, quickly rising to a senior executive position, his son Vincent said.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erwin Hirsh, 85, of Willow Grove, president of a manufacturing firm involved in reopening trade with China in the early 1970s, died of complications from kidney cancer Friday, Nov. 26, at Abington Memorial Hospital. After China and the United States began establishing ties in the early 1970s, Mr. Hirsh was instrumental in implementing banking procedures between the countries, his son David said. In 1975, the State Department selected Mr. Hirsh's company, A. Hirsh Inc., to host a trade delegation from China.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
William Orville Tinnin, who held a series of government supervisory jobs, died Monday. He was 67 and was a longtime resident of East Mount Airy. Tinnin - called Orville by family and friends - was born in Landenberg, Pa., and raised in Wilmington, Del. He moved to North Philadelphia about 1946. He later lived for about 20 years, in East Mount Airy. Since 1987, he has lived in Egg Harbor, N.J., said his wife of 40 years, the former Elizabeth Brogden. Tinnin joined the Merchant Marine as an able-bodied seaman when he was 17, and traveled to more than 30 countries over 10 years, said his wife.
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NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Rose Feith, 100, of Elkins Park, a longtime philanthropist who, with her late husband, gave generously to causes here and in Israel, died Friday, Jan. 29, at home of complications from a fall. For 59 years, Mrs. Feith was married to philanthropist, community leader, and businessman Dalck Feith. The pair gave time, effort, and financial support to many institutions and charitable causes. In Philadelphia, these included Einstein Medical Center, the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, Gratz College, and Beth Sholom Congregation.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
WILLIE GIAMPALMI was a busy man, but he liked it that way. He worked for 40 years as a delivery truck driver for the Daily News, but at the same time, he was a doorman for a tavern in Milmont Park, Delaware County. And after he retired from the Daily News in the mid-'80s, he wasn't about to sit still. He went to work at the Clayton Park Golf Course for 30 more years, working in the clubhouse. And, oh, yes, he also volunteered as a delivery man for Meals on Wheels. William "Willie" Giampalmi, the son of Italian immigrants, an outstanding athlete in his youth, and a Navy veteran serving on Liberty Ships in World War II, died Sunday.
NEWS
December 23, 2015
"The greatest rescue operation by a single ship in the history of mankind. "   - U.S. Maritime Administration   By Chris Gibbons On Dec. 22, 1950, Capt. Leonard LaRue, of Philadelphia, peered through his binoculars from the deck of his merchant cargo vessel, SS Meredith Victory, as it approached the besieged North Korean port of Hungnam. LaRue could see thousands of shivering refugees lining the harbor in a desperate attempt to escape the marauding Communist Chinese and North Korean soldiers who surrounded, and were quickly closing in on, the city.
NEWS
November 6, 2015
ISSUE | PORN EMAILS Kane is fighting the good fight Unlike the Signe Wilkinson cartoon depicting Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane exposing less-than-admirable conduct by members of the judiciary, the editorial "Let's not make a deal" (Thursday) is a classic in convoluted logic. Yes, the judges' conduct makes ludicrous the idea that they could be impartial in all matters Kane. Instead of thanking her for clearly demonstrating this, the editorial applauded a bizarre plan in the state Senate to remove her from office.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was 14, Edward W. Kelly Sr. had to end his formal education, finishing eighth grade at a school in Queen Village, because his father had just died. Then he did odd jobs to help support the household, in taprooms and on the docks, not far from where his family lived near Second and Catharine Streets. Years later, after decades as a longshoreman, he wanted quiet, daughter Marie Boody said. "My father purchased a plot of land in Swedesboro, 61/2 acres," in the late 1970s, she said.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Capella Jr., 89, of Mount Laurel, who retired in 1988 as a financial controller for the Army Communications Electronics Command at the former Fort Monmouth, died Tuesday, Oct. 7, of cancer at home. Born in Bristol Borough, Mr. Capella graduated from Bristol High School and served in the Navy during World War II as a signalman on Merchant Marine ships carrying supplies across the Atlantic to Europe. Mr. Capella "would stand next to the captain and relay the messages from other ships to the captain," his son, William A., said.
SPORTS
March 4, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
The Penn women's gymnastics team defeated Ursinus, 189.425-185.375, in Collegeville on Sunday for its third dual meet victory of the season. The Bears' Kristina Steffenhagen (Boyertown) finished fifth in the vault. Teammate Allison Patton (Moorestown) was seventh.   Baseball Gettysburg 4, St. Mary's (Md.) - Junior Nate Simon (Abington Friends) doubled in the go-ahead run and Drew Felsenthal induced a bases-loaded, game-ending 6-4-3 double play as the Bullets defeated the host Seahawks in their season opener.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
John J. Rozmus, 85, a mechanical engineer and inventor, died Monday, Oct. 15, at his home at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square. Mr. Rozmus worked as a mechanical engineer and inventor for more than 50 years. He started out designing electronic control and navigation instruments that were used for military aircraft during the Cold War. "What he designed was really the first of that kind that the Navy would use in the '50s and '60s," said Mr. Rozmus' son, Tom. He continued his work by opening two businesses, Harowe Serve Controls in West Chester and MicroFab Corp.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Erwin Hirsh, 85, of Willow Grove, president of a manufacturing firm involved in reopening trade with China in the early 1970s, died of complications from kidney cancer Friday, Nov. 26, at Abington Memorial Hospital. After China and the United States began establishing ties in the early 1970s, Mr. Hirsh was instrumental in implementing banking procedures between the countries, his son David said. In 1975, the State Department selected Mr. Hirsh's company, A. Hirsh Inc., to host a trade delegation from China.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Giglio, 83, of Delanco, a former maritime executive in Philadelphia who helped establish cross trade with Russia in the 1980s, died of pneumonia Friday, May 21, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly. After serving for 10 years in the Merchant Marine, Mr. Giglio fell naturally into the shipping business. The New England native settled in Riverside in 1955 and started working for Mathiasen Tanker Industries in Philadelphia, quickly rising to a senior executive position, his son Vincent said.
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