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Merchant Ships

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NEWS
May 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Moscow yesterday called on the United States to reduce its naval activity in the Persian Gulf as a step toward possible cooperation between the superpowers in protecting merchant shipping in the war-torn region. A spokesman for the Soviet Foreign Ministry, Boris Pyadyshev, said the Iraqi missile attack on the USS Stark was a "tragic event" that underlined the need for an immediate end to the Iran-Iraq war. When asked if Moscow and Washington might cooperate in the meantime to safeguard shipping in the gulf, Pyadyshev said: "A first step toward this would be a sharp decline in U.S. military activity and presence in the area, renunciation of support for those quarters which pursue aggression and real interest by the U.S. leadership in cooperation.
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The U.S. command in the Persian Gulf is seeking approval from Washington to attack any Iranian craft that fires on merchant ships in the gulf, the Washington Post reported today. Such a move would effectively strip away the last vestiges of U.S. neutrality in the long Iran-Iraq war, the Post said. Until now, the announced U.S. mission in the gulf has been confined to protecting merchant ships flying the U.S. flag, particularly the reflagged Kuwaiti tankers. However, in recent weeks, the United States has become far more aggressive in dealing with Iranian forces, attacking an Iranian ship that was laying mines in the gulf on Sept.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer United Press International also contributed to this article
A dramatic rescue effort was under way early today after a Coast Guard search plane spotted people waving flashlights from a life raft in stormy seas 200 miles off the New Jersey coast, near the site where a 250-foot cargo ship had capsized. As of 2 a.m., one crew member had been rescued and taken on board the merchant ship Eagle, which was assisting the Coast Guard in the rescue effort. The life raft was spotted about 12:15 a.m., five hours after the Lloyd's Bermuda captain radioed a distress signal, saying that the ship was sinking and that the 11 members of the crew were piling into two life rafts.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
When Councilman Wilson Goode Jr. halted the public-comment period of Thursday's Council meeting to ask the previous speaker to return to the lectern, there was that feeling in the chamber of two combatants about to square off. The previous speaker was Ori Feibush, the feisty Point Breeze developer, and he had just spent three minutes blasting a bill to create affordable housing as a bad plan and a waste of money. Goode, who can be downright prosecutorial with witnesses, asked Feibush if he thought the 10-year tax abatement on new construction was a waste of money as well.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | By Michael Walzer
All history is revisionist. We regularly rediscover the past, see things from a different perspective, find new ways to compare ourselves with distant ancestors. Consider the early 18th-century pirates - Blackbeard and friends - as they have been rediscovered by colonial historians and nautical archaeologists. The pirates are still what they always were: freebooters and seafaring adventurers who plundered the merchant ships that crisscrossed the Caribbean and the western Atlantic.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Ed Schumacher is not one of those old salts who weeps after six chords of "Anchors Aweigh. " But he does get emotional about seeing the Navy ride shotgun for reflagged Kuwaiti tankers in the Persian Gulf. His emotion is anger. Schumacher, a Merchant Marine navigator in World War II, can remember a traumatic period when German submarines, operating within sight of our shores, were sinking merchant ships at the rate of more than one a day because the Navy wasn't providing escort.
NEWS
January 3, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The U.S. Postal Service begins its 1988 stamp program this week with statehood bicentennial 22-cent commemoratives for Georgia and Connecticut, the fourth and fifth states to ratify the U.S. Constitution. The Georgia stamp, which will be issued Wednesday, depicts Atlanta's skyline in the background, partially covered by an image of an oak tree in the foreground. Printed along the bottom are the state's name and "January 2, 1788," the date of its ratification. The Connecticut stamp, which will be issued Saturday, features a harbor scene typical of the town of Mystic, and the bow of the Charles W. Morgan, a fully rigged whaling ship.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the World War II era, at least three ships bore names from this region. Most notable was the heavy cruiser USS Chester. This warship compiled a distinguished record in the battle for the Pacific. The USS Chester, which was built at a New York shipyard, was laid down in 1928 and completed in 1930. When she entered the war in 1941, the Chester was able to steam at 32 knots and carried a complement of about 1,200 men. It carried conventional armaments: nine 8-inch guns and eight 5-inch guns, and it carried four aircraft that could be launched from two catapults, according to Jane's Fighting Ships of World War II (1992)
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Meet Bengt Janssen, the Norwegian consul in Philadelphia. Meet Bengt Janssen, the Swedish consul in Philadelphia. Meet Bengt Janssen, the Finnish consul in Philadelphia. "Yes, I was asked to become the Danish consul a little while ago. I said, 'No, three is enough,' " Janssen said in a interview at the consulate. The consulate is a large room with an impressive desk and some dandy flags just behind the offices of Janssen's ship supply business near Front and Christian streets in Queen Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1989 | By Catherine Lee, Special to The Inquirer
Frank Cautilli has forgotten most of the names and faces of the men he worked with at the sprawling Hog Island shipyard. But he remembers the biting cold that gripped the Philadelphia riverfront in 1917. Cautilli, 90, was working as a surveyor at the yard, where the mercury dipped to 7 below as thousands of workers drove wooden piles into frozen, marshy ground and poured concrete for 50 shipbuilding slots that would line a mile-long stretch of the Delaware River. What also lingers in Cautilli's memory was the frenzied pace at Hog Island.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
When Councilman Wilson Goode Jr. halted the public-comment period of Thursday's Council meeting to ask the previous speaker to return to the lectern, there was that feeling in the chamber of two combatants about to square off. The previous speaker was Ori Feibush, the feisty Point Breeze developer, and he had just spent three minutes blasting a bill to create affordable housing as a bad plan and a waste of money. Goode, who can be downright prosecutorial with witnesses, asked Feibush if he thought the 10-year tax abatement on new construction was a waste of money as well.
NEWS
April 9, 2006 | By Michael Meoli
I am not alone among Global War On Terrorism (GWOT) veterans who believe that the predominantly liberal media, in pounding home the notion that our country had no authority or cause to lead an attack on Sadaam Hussein's regime in Iraq, are bringing water to terrorists and helping to cement the foundation of al-Qaeda. Numerous articles, op-eds and "news" broadcasts are giving Osama bin Laden exactly what he needs to get Islamic fence-sitters to do their "duty" for his evil cause. As far as I am concerned, the liberation of Iraq may truly be the "mother of all wars," and our success or failure there could be the difference between world freedom or global catastrophe.
NEWS
December 19, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On Veterans Day, Nov. 11, a local battle was won in the continuing campaign for recognition of the crucial role the U.S. Merchant Marine played in World War II. After a long struggle with the Marple Township government and a local veterans' group, a Merchant Marine plaque was added to plaques representing the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard on the wall of honor at Veterans Memorial Park, on Lawrence Road in Broomall. "This represents a nine-year struggle with the township to include the United States Merchant Marine on the memorial wall," said Dan Vetre of Havertown, a Merchant Marine veteran.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the World War II era, at least three ships bore names from this region. Most notable was the heavy cruiser USS Chester. This warship compiled a distinguished record in the battle for the Pacific. The USS Chester, which was built at a New York shipyard, was laid down in 1928 and completed in 1930. When she entered the war in 1941, the Chester was able to steam at 32 knots and carried a complement of about 1,200 men. It carried conventional armaments: nine 8-inch guns and eight 5-inch guns, and it carried four aircraft that could be launched from two catapults, according to Jane's Fighting Ships of World War II (1992)
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | By Michael Walzer
All history is revisionist. We regularly rediscover the past, see things from a different perspective, find new ways to compare ourselves with distant ancestors. Consider the early 18th-century pirates - Blackbeard and friends - as they have been rediscovered by colonial historians and nautical archaeologists. The pirates are still what they always were: freebooters and seafaring adventurers who plundered the merchant ships that crisscrossed the Caribbean and the western Atlantic.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Iron shipbuilding along the Delaware River is flaunted mast-high in Alexander Charles Stuart's paintings at the Brandywine River Museum. These broadside portrait paintings of merchant steamships by the Scottish-born Chester resident, who died 99 years ago at age 67, helped establish the 19th-century commercial fleet as national emblems. The advertising this museum did several years ago to start rounding up pictures for this exhibit was a clear signal. This was to be no tepid, run-of-the-mill show from storage, no simple trotting out of familiar talent.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | Daily News wire services
Efforts to restore Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide were complicated yesterday after pro-military gunmen kidnapped a legislative ally of the exiled leader. Meanwhile, the Pentagon said a U.S. Coast Guard cutter helping to enforce the United Nations embargo against the impoverished Caribbean nation fired warning shots across the bow of a Haiti-bound merchant ship after it defied orders to sail away. The vessel, registered in the Caribbean Turks and Caicos Islands, then complied by altering course.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Leroy "Roy" Watson, the kind of bartender patrons would follow when he moved to another job, died Wednesday. He was 66 and lived in West Philadelphia. Roy was a professional bartender who could mix any drink without going to the book. He also was a professional listener who could grasp any problem, understand any issue, sympathize with any sad story. What made him really good was that he didn't have the answers. Someone leaning into their third double shot doesn't want to hear a guy shoot back a fast, glib solution to their problem.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
It's pretty tough to keep a good town down. Take Marcus Hook, for example. It has been bombarded by the British, pillaged by pirates and invaded by Warlock bikers, and it still bounces back stronger than ever. Joke all you want about the Hook and its aromatic refineries - and many Philadelphians do - it doesn't upset the locals. They love the town the way parents love a baby, because it is their own. Life there, like the river it bounds, just goes on. And now Marcus Hook is planning a centennial celebration, 100 years of progress - and jokes - since it split from Lower Chichester in 1892.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Two defendants had sea legs, but nothing like peg legs, or parrots on their shoulder, or eye patches, or swords, for that matter. The third defendant was a landlubber. None had cause to sing yesterday, certainly not "Yo Ho Ho and a Bottle of Rum," when a U.S. District Court jury convicted them of trafficking in about 50,000 gallons of fuel oil stolen from ships moored on the Delaware. River pirates on the Delaware? The prosecutor didn't call them pirates in court, but later said the term might apply.
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