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BUSINESS
July 13, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bradley T. Sheares, the U.S. marketing chief of Merck & Co. Inc., has been replaced in a shake-up of the drugmaker's marketing division, the company said yesterday. Sheares, based in Upper Gwynedd, Montgomery County, was succeeded by Adam Schechter, current general manager of Merck's joint venture with Schering-Plough Corp., said spokesman Raymond Kerins. The shuffle at Merck U.S. Human Health came two months after chief executive Richard Clark installed a new global marketing chief, Peter Loescher, as part of a restructuring prompted largely by the Vioxx recall and litigation.
NEWS
July 11, 2011
Merck Inc., with headquarters in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and operations in the Philadelphia suburbs, said Monday that company researchers will collaborate with the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the University of California-San Francisco and seven other academic institutions to develop new approaches toward eradicating HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is the primary funding organization, though Merck will not receive any funding for its participation.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Officials for the pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co. say there are just barely enough parking spaces for their 4,600 employees now. When the company's planned expansion is finished in 1993, there will be 700 more people working there and they will need a place to park. So Merck went before the Zoning Hearing Board of Upper Gwynedd Township on Tuesday to ask for variances that would allow for the construction of a new lot and the expansion of an old one. "We've always felt that we've been playing catch-up in parking," Joseph J. Salvia, manager of facilities area engineering for Merck, said in an interview after the hearing.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. presented details yesterday of an ambitious restructuring campaign it hopes will restore its once-vaunted position, including narrowing its research priorities and reducing sales calls on physicians. The New Jersey company, with about a fifth of its global workforce of 63,000 based in the suburbs of Philadelphia, said total cutbacks over the next five years should be worth $4.5 billion to $5 billion - $1 billion more than it first announced last month. It also pledged to reverse its slide in earnings starting in 2007 and hit "double-digit" compounded annual growth in earnings in following years.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
Merck & Co. Inc., a Whitehouse Station, N.J., pharmaceutical giant with major operations in Montgomery County, said today that it had agreed to pay $430 million for Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., which specializes in medicines for eye diseases. Boards of directors for both companies as well as Inspire's largest shareholder, Warburg Pincus Private Equity IX L.P., have approved the deal, which values Inspire at $5 a share, a 26 percent premium over Inspire's Monday close.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first combination drug to treat type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol in one tablet. Merck & Co. Inc.'s Juvisync combines two previously approved prescription medicines in one tablet for adults who need both sitagliptin and simvastatin. About 20 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and many have high cholesterol.    - David Sell
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Merck said it received approval from the European Commission for doctors to prescribe Victrelis (chemical name boceprevir) to patients with hepatitis C. The drug is used with two other drugs to treat adults with liver diseases caused by the virus. An estimated four million people in Europe have hepatitis C. The commission decision allows Merck to market the drug for the specified purpose in 27 European Union countries and European Economic Area members Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Still suffering from its Vioxx withdrawal, Merck & Co. Inc. said yesterday that profit fell 15 percent in the first quarter this year. Net income declined to $1.37 billion from $1.62 billion. Earnings per share were down 11 cents to 62 cents. Worldwide sales slipped 5 percent to $5.36 billion, from $5.63 billion a year earlier. The news mostly matched expectations on Wall Street, where shares in Merck, based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., with major operations in Montgomery County, closed at $34.28, up 21 cents or 0.62 percent.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drug ads with scary-sounding side effects have regularly appeared on TV since 1995, but rarely has a major pharmaceutical company played such an unscripted, prime-time role as Merck did Monday night - a moment that put the klieg lights on corporate political contributions. Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann attacked fellow Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry during the GOP debate over the Texas governor's 2007 decision to have young girls inoculated against a virus that can contribute to cervical cancer.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of Merck & Co. Inc. rose more than 8 percent yesterday after the Whitehouse Station, N.J., pharmaceutical company announced better-than-expected profits for the second quarter. Investors also were encouraged that Merck's cholesterol-lowering drug Zocor was holding up against intense competition, although the rate by which it is growing is slowing. Even so, the number of patients taking the drug has doubled to almost 7 million worldwide, the company said. Net income rose 19 percent to $1.15 billion, or 96 cents a share, beating the average estimate of 95 cents a share from a survey of 30 analysts.
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NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
NEWS
April 6, 2015
The title of Kenneth Rowen Heimlich was reported incorrectly in an obituary Friday. Dr. Heimlich was former executive director of pharmaceutical research and development for Merck, Sharp & Dohme.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Rowen Heimlich, 82, of West Chester, former director of research for Merck, Sharp & Dohme, died Tuesday, March 17, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Born to Herman and Lula Heimlich in Rockford, Ill., Dr. Heimlich grew up in Indiana. He earned a bachelor of science degree in 1954, a master's degree in 1956, and a doctorate in 1958, all in pharmaceutical chemistry from Purdue University. Dr. Heimlich was director of pharmaceutical research and development for Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in West Point.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. dove deeper into the antibiotic drug market Monday when it agreed to buy Cubist Pharmaceuticals for $9.5 billion, including debt. The deal would pay Cubist stockholders $102 per share in cash, which Merck calculates is a 35 percent premium to Cubist's average closing price in the preceding five trading days. The agreement includes $8.4 billion for the shares and assumption of about $1.1 billion in company debt. Merck is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and has large facilities in Upper Gwynedd and West Point, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Mel Kohn is at the intersection of the governmental, nonprofit, and corporate efforts directed at the Ebola crisis in West Africa. Kohn, who lives in Philadelphia, works for Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County. He joined Merck Vaccines after 14 years of work in public health for the State of Oregon. With the drugmaker's office of corporate philanthropy funding the trip, he and Merck colleague John Grabenstein visited Sierra Leone in October as part of a group put together by the Virginia-based nonprofit Project HOPE and invited by the Sierra Leone government.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Itching to compete and join the fight to solve one of the world's most talked-about health concerns, Merck & Co. got back in the business of making Ebola vaccine Monday. The pharmaceutical giant announced that it will pay at least $30 million to license a potential drug from a small, Iowa-based company called NewLink Genetics Corp. NewLink will get a second payment of $20 million once the next phase of clinical trials starts, which might be in the first months of 2015 - a sign of the accelerated process.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bit more than a year after announcing plans to cut 8,500 jobs, including hundreds in the Philadelphia suburbs, Merck & Co. chief executive officer Ken Frazier said Monday that the drugmaker was on track to deliver the $2.5 billion in annual cost savings that he promised to Wall Street. "Last October, we launched a multiyear initiative to transform Merck and build a platform for sustained future growth," Frazier said in a statement. "One year later, we delivered solid third-quarter results and are making steady progress in our transformation, including divesting noncore assets, reducing our expense base, and investing in our promising new product launches and pipeline.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The other Merck said Monday that it would spend $17 billion to buy the chemical company Sigma-Aldrich Corp., based in St. Louis. Merck KGaA of Darmstadt, Germany, made Monday's announcement. Merck & Co. is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and has a big operation in Montgomery County. Both companies make pharmaceutical products. They are separate corporations now, but it was not always so. Amid the death, destruction, and fear of foreigners during World War I, the U.S. government announced in 1917 that it would seize several companies with German connections.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. said on Sept. 4 that the Food and Drug Administration approved what Merck said was a groundbreaking cancer treatment that it hopes will cure many patients and generate billions of dollars in revenue. On the same day, Bristol-Myers Squibb said bunk to that, alleging patent infringement in a lawsuit in federal court in Delaware, where both global pharmaceutical giants are registered. Bristol-Myers, whose version of that type of cancer drug was approved in Japan in July, hoped the legal move would thwart Merck in the industry race to sell expensive cancer medicine.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a huge boost to the research efforts of drugmaker Merck & Co., the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a new type of drug that unlocks the body's immune system to attack cancer cells. Merck, which is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and employs thousands of people in Montgomery County, had staked much of its future hopes on approval and then sales, which analysts expect will generate billions of dollars a year. The chemical name of the drug is pembrolizumab and its brand name will be Keytruda.
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