CollectionsMerit System
IN THE NEWS

Merit System

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | BY GERALD K. McOSCAR
The current Pennsylvania Supreme Court controversy involving Justice Rolf Larsen's grave accusations about several of his colleagues (and vice versa) has precipitated another round of lamentations and exhortations from those who propose to replace a less than perfect system - the electoral process where less than perfect voters elect less than perfect judges to do less than perfect jobs of interpreting and enforcing less than perfect laws - with the merit selection of judges, an even less than perfect system.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | PA. JUDICIARY Use a merit system Pennsylvanians have emerged from a judicial election with a historic number of vacancies and a historic amount - more than $16 million - spent on attack ads. As all of Pennsylvania's living governors, we urge all members of the state House of Representatives to support merit selection of statewide judges. Local judges would not be affected. Pennsylvania is one of the few states that elect judges in partisan elections. Merit selection is a commonsense solution used in many states and would be a vast improvement over our system, in which judges are often selected based on fund-raising prowess, name recognition, ballot position, or party affiliation.
NEWS
January 19, 1986
Delaware's Gov. Castle, in his State of the State address to the legislature last week, outlined a program for improving public schools that deserves implementation at least on a trial basis. It provides for compromises to reconcile different views on education reform. Delaware school districts are having difficulty attracting qualified teachers in sufficient numbers because of relatively low starting salaries. The problem is expected to worsen as New Jersey raises starting teacher salaries significantly.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Prohibition was repealed at 5:32 p.m. on Dec. 5, 1933, millions of Americans galloped to their favorite speakeasies to raise a glass of champagne - or beer or whiskey or gin, or whatever else stood on well-stocked shelves - to celebrate the passing of an almost 14-year period in which the manufacture and sale of alcohol was banned in the United States. But it didn't take long for puritanical instincts in some states - especially Pennsylvania, famous for its Blue Laws against many forms of Sunday recreation - to take hold.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The three Montgomery County commissioners went to the public budget hearing yesterday ready to defend their proposed $278.9 million 1996 spending plan. Officials armed with figures and facts packed into the commissioners' boardroom already jammed with county residents and row officers, including the sheriff and the district attorney. There was an impassioned plea for more money for Norristown's Elmwood Park Zoo, and there was a handful of disgruntled county employees. But no budgetary battle was fought yesterday.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | By Gerald J. Fitzpatrick
The recent Inquirer series, "Disorder in the Court," has prompted reconsideration of the way in which we select judges. Disturbed by the pervasive influence of politics in electing as well as appointing judges, reformers have called instead for "merit selection. " Under a typical merit system the governor fills a court vacancy with a judge chosen from a list of candidates recommended by a special nominating commission composed of lay people, attorneys and current judges. After serving one year the judge stands unopposed for election to a significantly longer term.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
A four-month study of Bucks County's jobs and salaries has recommended that a merit-pay system be implemented for nonunion employees. The study, released yesterday by the county commissioners at their weekly agenda meeting in Doylestown, also recommended that the county adopt a job- classification system and establish base salaries for employees depending on factors such as experience, responsibility and supervision exercised. The county has never had a job-classification system or salary structure for nonunion employees, according to Peat Marwick Main & Co., which performed the study.
NEWS
May 10, 2008
Support for ex-judge I vehemently disagree with the editorial ("Judge removed: A vote for merit selection," May 7) in which you excoriate our client, former Philadelphia Municipal Judge Deborah S. Griffin, and use her to make a case against electing judges. "Merit selection" vs. "elective selection" was not the issue in Griffin's case. Griffin did not have political or media backing when she ran for judge. She relied on her strong moral character, intestinal fortitude, supportive family, and faith in her ability to prevail against all odds.
NEWS
October 28, 1988
It's time for the annual Class 500 flap. This time, it's Mayor Goode who deserves the heat for ignoring his promise to clean up the city's social- political patronage system. Last year, you'll recall, the mayor was on the attack over how the grants, which go to assorted charitable, cultural and civic activities, had gotten out of control. That followed the revelation that, among other things, Council President Joseph E. Coleman had stashed away nearly $500,000 of Class 500 money in accounts for two nonexistent groups.
SPORTS
March 5, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Brett Butler says Mike Piazza is selfish. Tommy Lasorda says Butler should know selfish, since he practiced it so much during his career. "He could tell you what he was hitting against righthanders and what he was hitting against lefthanders," Lasorda, the Dodgers' former manager and now a vice president for the club, told the Orange County Register. "He's full of it. It was a terrible statement. Whatever his reasons were for saying it, they were stupid. " Butler, who is retired, questioned Piazza's abilities as a leader, noting that he seemed more concerned about personal statistics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | PA. JUDICIARY Use a merit system Pennsylvanians have emerged from a judicial election with a historic number of vacancies and a historic amount - more than $16 million - spent on attack ads. As all of Pennsylvania's living governors, we urge all members of the state House of Representatives to support merit selection of statewide judges. Local judges would not be affected. Pennsylvania is one of the few states that elect judges in partisan elections. Merit selection is a commonsense solution used in many states and would be a vast improvement over our system, in which judges are often selected based on fund-raising prowess, name recognition, ballot position, or party affiliation.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Prohibition was repealed at 5:32 p.m. on Dec. 5, 1933, millions of Americans galloped to their favorite speakeasies to raise a glass of champagne - or beer or whiskey or gin, or whatever else stood on well-stocked shelves - to celebrate the passing of an almost 14-year period in which the manufacture and sale of alcohol was banned in the United States. But it didn't take long for puritanical instincts in some states - especially Pennsylvania, famous for its Blue Laws against many forms of Sunday recreation - to take hold.
NEWS
May 10, 2008
Support for ex-judge I vehemently disagree with the editorial ("Judge removed: A vote for merit selection," May 7) in which you excoriate our client, former Philadelphia Municipal Judge Deborah S. Griffin, and use her to make a case against electing judges. "Merit selection" vs. "elective selection" was not the issue in Griffin's case. Griffin did not have political or media backing when she ran for judge. She relied on her strong moral character, intestinal fortitude, supportive family, and faith in her ability to prevail against all odds.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | By Melia Bowie INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Negotiations between the Colonial school board and its teachers' union are barely under way, but both sides have jumped straight to a state mediator to help draft a new contract for the district, which has drawn local and national attention since it enacted a groundbreaking merit-pay plan last year.Teachers and other staff members, who have long been critical of the controversial initiative, seek to abolish it in their first proposal to the board - delivered two weeks ago via state mediator Jill Rivera.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teachers in Cincinnati have approved a two-year trial of a groundbreaking pay-for-performance system that is thought to be the first in the country to abandon longevity and level of education as the chief determinants of teacher salaries. The plan, which passed by a vote of 1,255-1,046, is similar to one being sought by the Philadelphia School District in negotiations with its teachers union. The vote took place Thursday and Friday, and results were tallied Friday night. Under the Cincinnati plan, each teacher will be evaluated by a principal and a specially trained peer in four areas of professional practice, and will move up a five-step career ladder based on skills and knowledge.
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF Inquirer suburban staff wrier Meredith Fischer contributed to this article
President Judge A. Leo Sereni sat hunched over a table in his chambers yesterday, explaining Delaware County's judicial system to a handful of curious Russian visitors. Oleg Belokurov, who is a lawyer, a professor and a state representative in Russia, questioned the Pennsylvania system of electing judges and compared it with the Russian system, in which judges are appointed on merit. "Don't they [candidates] change their views, opinions, just to get elected?" Belokurov asked. "Sure, that happens," said Sereni, who was elected nine years ago. "But I think the merit system is baloney.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The union representing principals, assistant principals, and other supervisory employees in the Philadelphia School District wants a 15 percent increase in its pay scale over the next two years. The Commonwealth Association of School Administrators - which has lamented the loss of city principals to higher-paying suburban jobs - also seeks to end a merit-pay system for principals, which union leaders claim actually sets pay back further. Raises under that system will soon be distributed for the first time.
SPORTS
March 5, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Brett Butler says Mike Piazza is selfish. Tommy Lasorda says Butler should know selfish, since he practiced it so much during his career. "He could tell you what he was hitting against righthanders and what he was hitting against lefthanders," Lasorda, the Dodgers' former manager and now a vice president for the club, told the Orange County Register. "He's full of it. It was a terrible statement. Whatever his reasons were for saying it, they were stupid. " Butler, who is retired, questioned Piazza's abilities as a leader, noting that he seemed more concerned about personal statistics.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | By Jon Sanders
Psychologists tell us the stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. As affirmative action slowly dies, first in California and Texas, its grieving supporters exhibit these stages as they seek to preserve diversity in this dawning age of merit-based admissions. On the other hand, solutions recommended by the University of California's Board of Regents show true, groundbreaking acceptance. Denial. One group of affirmative-action supporters stuck in denial is the Association of American Universities (AAU)
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|