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Meryl Streep

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's late 1982, and Meryl Streep is busy being Karen Silkwood, the gum- chewing Oklahoma nuclear-plant worker exposed to radiation, who blows the whistle on the operation's reckless safety violations cover-up. One night, Silkwood director Mike Nichols goes off to a screening of Streep's soon-to-be- released Sophie's Choice. Nichols sits in the theater, watching this mysterious woman with a Polish accent and a doomy, faraway look, and he can't believe it. "It was extremely unnerving," Nichols recalls, "because there wasn't an inch of that woman that was familiar to me. Not a finger, not an eyelash, nothing!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With an Irish accent that is eerily accurate down to the Donegal vowels, Meryl Streep adds to her celebrated global repertoire in Dancing at Lughnasa. But in this melancholy and haunting movie, it is her body language that really counts. As Kate, the oldest and prissiest of the Mundy sisters, Streep's smallest gestures and movements, even her posture, are perfectly in character. She sits like a little girl who expects to be rapped on the knuckles by a nun's ruler if she lapses from rigidity.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the Democratic National Convention, as heavy-handed political movies threaten to sway this year's voters even more than mind-numbing political ads, we bring you the following public-service bulletin: Meryl Streep's hard-nosed portrayal of the powerful conspiratorial senator in Jonathan Demme's remake of "The Manchurian Candidate," which opens July 30, just ONE DAY after the convention ends, is not - we repeat, NOT - based on a...
NEWS
April 2, 2003 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her chickens certainly have come home to roost. Indeed, they're perched on the New York Times Best-Seller List, under the category Children's Picture Books, for the 20th consecutive week. We're squawking about Sandra Boynton's delightful book and CD, Philadelphia Chickens. Philadelphia as in reared in Mount Airy, educated at Germantown Friends. Chickens as in lovable and laughable, especially when swinging cracked Liberty Bells. Boynton, who turns 50 tomorrow, first peeped onto the pop culture scene in the late 1970s with deceptively simple greeting cards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | By Carol Horner, Inquirer Staff Writer
How's this? Envision Meryl Streep ugly and unpopular. Impossible, you say? But she says it was true in her childhood, in the '50s in the suburbs of northern New Jersey. "I thought no one liked me," she told a Time magazine reporter a decade ago. She described running from an irate crowd of youngsters and climbing a tree to escape them. "Besides that," Current Biography 1980 reports her as saying, "I was ugly. With my glasses and permanented hair, I looked like a mini-adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Meryl Streep took her mother to see One True Thing the other day. They sat in the screening room, watching as the hard-charging journalist daughter (Renee Zellweger) comes home to care for her cancer-stricken mother (you know who) while college professor dad (William Hurt) stands on the periphery, lost in a world of old books and young coeds. "It really upset her," says Streep, with a laugh. "But not for the right reasons. It upset her that I died, and she sort of couldn't get over that.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012
Directed by David Frankel. With Meryl Streep, Tommy Lee Jones, and Steve Carell. Distributed by Columbia Pictures and MGM. Running time: 1 hour, 39 mins. Parent's guide: PG-13 (sexual candor) Playing at: area theaters
NEWS
January 13, 1998
The most frightened people in history Without a war on their own territory for a century and a half, Americans love to scare themselves. The books of Stephen King . . . enjoy a tremendous popularity. . . .Unpasteurized cheeses with mold - Camembert and Brie - are absolutely forbidden . . . Meryl Streep, the world-renowned biochemist who does some acting on the side, warned on television against serving apples and apple juice to children. Jacek Kalabinsky Polityka (Warsaw), Nov. 1, 1997
NEWS
January 27, 2012
Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Musician Dolly Parton; writer Alan Zweibel. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - President Obama; Yo-Yo Ma & Friends perform. Jimmy Kimmel Live (Midnight, 6ABC) - Meryl Streep; Stephen Merchant; Kina Grannis performs. Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (12:35 a.m., NBC10) - Daniel Radcliffe; Elisabeth Hasselbeck; Common.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There's a car driving on a sandy beach. Two people are in the car. They are bonding. Is it "The Evening Star"? Is it "Some Mother's Son"? Is it "Marvin's Room"? Yes to all three, although this instant cliche weighs most heavily on "Marvin's Room," the third movie out of the holiday gate, and therefore the most vulnerable to an intrusive sense of deja vu. The movie stars Diane Keaton as a spinster living in a modest Florida bungalow, caring for her bedridden father (Hume Cronyn)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Meryl Streep, the Takacs Quartet, and Philip Roth aren't names likely to be seen together, much less people found in the same concert hall. Yet Princeton University Concerts presented all three in Richardson Auditorium on Friday evening, with the quartet playing Arvo Pärt and Franz Schubert, Streep reading extensively from the 2006 novel Everyman , and its author, Roth, listening in the audience - in a one-time-only event that guaranteed a packed house. Interdisciplinary events are a priority for Princeton University Concerts, this one building on a similar Takacs program presented at Carnegie Hall in 2007, with Philip Seymour Hoffman reading Roth's accounts of how everyday people decline, die, are grieved and remembered.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE GIVER" is a bit of a dud on-screen, and we might have seen it coming - writing about an emotionless society is one thing, filming one is quite another. The movie is drawn from Lois Lowry's popular and influential novel of tweens growing up in an authoritarian society where citizens take a daily injection of drugs to dull their feelings. More disturbingly, leaders of the blandly named "Community" come up with Orwellian language to describe the actions they take to maintain rigid uniformity - troublesome infants and burdensome elderly are released and removed to "elsewhere" via lethal injection, shown in graphic detail in one particularly gruesome scene.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
FRED DILGER was a big-time residential designer in Manhattan and Atlanta when, he said, "You get to the end of the rainbow and you ask, 'Is this all there is?' I wanted something more. " Seven years ago, he found that something. He suddenly gave up his career and all his worldly possessions to become a Franciscan friar in Kensington, living among and feeding the poor. At St. Francis Inn, the core team of Franciscan friars, nuns and lay staff served 151,699 hot meals last year to the neighborhood's most desperately poor men, women and children.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE WEEK WAS marked by the sad, stunning news of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman 's tragic death and the subsequent outpouring of emotion - along with some lesser celebrity goings-on.   Yesterday A private funeral was held for Hoffman at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in Manhattan, the same church that hosted the funerals of Aaliyah and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis . Among the mourners, Cate Blanchett , Spike Lee , Joaquin Phoenix and Meryl Streep , the New York Daily News reported.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stars mourn Hoffman Hollywood and Broadway royalty showed up in force Friday to mourn Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman at a funeral service at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola on Manhattan's Upper East Side. Hoffman, 46, died Sunday of an apparent drug overdose. Paul Thomas Anderson , who directed Hoffman in three films, Boogie Nights , Magnolia , and The Master , delivered a eulogy, as did Cate Blanchett and Spike Lee . "Phil was a lovely guy, a great artist," said Lee, who directed Hoffman in The 25th Hour . Playwright Jose Rivera , whose work has been produced by Hoffman's LAByrinth Theatre Company, said Hoffman "left an enormous amount of love behind.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"AUGUST: OSAGE County" is in its own way a feel-good movie, in that it's bound to make you feel good about your own family, especially post-holiday. Did you get through the season without knocking your mother to the floor and informing her that you are now in charge? Well, then you have a healthier relationship than Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in "AOC," a sort of MMA (mixed-martial acting) cage match between the two Oscar-winning Hollywood titans. Some of this takes the form of an actual brawl, but it also expresses itself as an extreme awards-season performance pitch (Roberts and Streep will compete for a Golden Globe on Sunday evening)
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
NEW YORK - Julia Roberts has a line in August: Osage County , the all-star adaptation of the Tracy Letts ' Pulitzer Prize winner, that sums up the cheery worldview on display in this dysfunctional family free-for-all. "Thank God we can't tell the future," Roberts' character, the oldest and seemingly most together of the three Weston sisters, sighs. "We'd never get out of bed. " "That was really the one line of mine that just knocks you out," Roberts says. "Because it's so true, and it's so heartbreaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic, actor, writer, director, and producer Mel Brooks , who is one of only 14 people to have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony award, will be given the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award, the AFI announced Friday. Brooks, 86, is the 41st recipient of the honor, which has gone to such Hollywood legends as Orson Welles , Bette Davis , Elizabeth Taylor , Steven Spielberg , Meryl Streep , and Morgan Freeman . The award gala will air in late June on TNT and Turner Classic Movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012
Directed by David Frankel. With Meryl Streep, Tommy Lee Jones, and Steve Carell. Distributed by Columbia Pictures and MGM. Running time: 1 hour, 39 mins. Parent's guide: PG-13 (sexual candor) Playing at: area theaters
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2012 | BY STEVEN ZEITCHIK, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Shortly after Meryl Streep beat out Viola Davis for the lead actress Academy Award on Sunday night, Disney / ABC Television President Anne Sweeney bumped into Octavia Spencer, Davis' co-star in "The Help. " Sweeney was overheard in an elevator leaving the awards telling Spencer that she was "upset. I feel bad for Viola," Sweeney said. Spencer, who had just won an Oscar herself for supporting actress, asked Sweeney how she thought the upset had happened. "I have my theories," the executive said, without elaborating.
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