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Metabolism

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NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Angelia Herrin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
For years, you diet without success while your friend eats fries and double cheeseburgers without gaining a pound. But you console yourself by thinking it's not your fault: Your friend's body just burns up calories faster, right? Wrong, thunder thighs. The truth is, you don't exercise enough and you sneak a lot more cookies than you're willing to admit, even to yourself. That is the inescapable conclusion of U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers who have spent the last three years studying more than 100 people in the department's calorimeter, a live-in laboratory designed to monitor food intake and measure human energy.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Tired of all those years of counting calories, passing up Tastykakes and cheesesteaks, but still wondering how much good you're really doing in the battle to lose weight? Now, a little gadget could help clear things up for dieters and fitness fanatics. HealtheTech Inc., a Colorado-based health technology company, this week debuted the BodyGem at the American Dietetic Association Food & Nutrition Conference in Denver. BodyGem is a portable monitor that allows you to measure your metabolism, the process that converts your food to energy and releases wastes.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's cancer research institute is suing its former scientific director and a biotechnology company he founded for more than $1 billion, accusing him of stealing intellectual property and trying to profit from it. Craig B. Thompson, who joined Penn in 1999 as scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, led pioneering studies of the metabolism of cancer cells, according to the lawsuit filed...
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
During an exercise session, vigorous cardiovascular workouts such as running or biking can typically torch more calories than resistance or strength training. But what happens once the workout is over? Exercise scientists have long debated the wondrous notion of an exercise afterburn, or the body's ability to keep burning calories even after you've showered and returned to your desk. Meanwhile, if such an effect exists, it is not clear which form of exercise - cardio or strength training - has a greater metabolism-boosting potential.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Ashley Miller, For The Inquirer
Question: What are five simple ways to be healthier? Answer: With warmer weather just around the corner, you may be thinking about fitting into shorts and swimsuits after a long winter. Leading a healthier lifestyle can assist in shedding a few pounds to get ready for the beach this summer. Here are five simple tips to get you started: 1. Get out for a walk. Short walks have many health benefits. Walking gets your heart pumping, your metabolism moving, and can help clear your mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015
MY SISTER - yes, my sister - recently asked me what I thought about different natural and medical weight-loss products currently on the market. Without the slightest hesitation, I looked her in the eyes and said, "I hope you are not putting your health and possibly your life at risk messing around with this garbage. " If your goal is to slim down, get fit and get healthier, the only two options I suggest are eating healthier and exercising. The first thing you may want to do is kick the habit on the three bottles of soda you drink each day. It still vexes me that, more often than not, emotions trump common sense.
FOOD
January 18, 1989 | By Isabel Forgang, New York Daily News
It's time to start anew, to undo all the bad habits we developed over the last year, especially the habit of overeating and watching the scale climb to new heights. With that in mind, here's a look at three new diet books, one of which may have the answer for you. As with all diets, however, consult your doctor first. "The Two-Day Diet" by Tessa Cooper and Glenn Cooper (Random House, $16.95): Temptation, boredom and a craving for fattening foods are the three gremlins pushing you away from your good diet intentions, say Tessa and Glenn Cooper.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When researchers at the University of Pennsylvania messed with the internal clocks of mouse fat cells, a surprising thing happened. The mice got fat. Figuring out why led to more surprises. Mice usually eat at night, but the altered mice ate more of their food during the day. They got fat even though they ate the same number of calories as regular, nocturnal-feeding mice. And when the researchers gave altered mice two of the key ingredients in fish oil, the animals didn't get fat. That's a lot to digest, but it has potential implications for humans as we enter the season of stuffed refrigerators that beckon some to eat when they should be resting.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
MALNOURISHED BONES. Teenage girls whose anorexia nervosa disrupts their menstrual periods have significantly weaker bones than do women who suffer the eating disorder later in life. That finding by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers suggests normal adolescent sexual development is crucial to healthy bones and avoidance of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis. The report in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism underscores the dangers of anorexia, a frequent cause of irregular menstruation among teenage girls.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015
MY SISTER - yes, my sister - recently asked me what I thought about different natural and medical weight-loss products currently on the market. Without the slightest hesitation, I looked her in the eyes and said, "I hope you are not putting your health and possibly your life at risk messing around with this garbage. " If your goal is to slim down, get fit and get healthier, the only two options I suggest are eating healthier and exercising. The first thing you may want to do is kick the habit on the three bottles of soda you drink each day. It still vexes me that, more often than not, emotions trump common sense.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Ashley Miller, For The Inquirer
Question: What are five simple ways to be healthier? Answer: With warmer weather just around the corner, you may be thinking about fitting into shorts and swimsuits after a long winter. Leading a healthier lifestyle can assist in shedding a few pounds to get ready for the beach this summer. Here are five simple tips to get you started: 1. Get out for a walk. Short walks have many health benefits. Walking gets your heart pumping, your metabolism moving, and can help clear your mind.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When researchers at the University of Pennsylvania messed with the internal clocks of mouse fat cells, a surprising thing happened. The mice got fat. Figuring out why led to more surprises. Mice usually eat at night, but the altered mice ate more of their food during the day. They got fat even though they ate the same number of calories as regular, nocturnal-feeding mice. And when the researchers gave altered mice two of the key ingredients in fish oil, the animals didn't get fat. That's a lot to digest, but it has potential implications for humans as we enter the season of stuffed refrigerators that beckon some to eat when they should be resting.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Risks and the Rewards By William J. Broad Simon & Schuster. 336 pp. $26 Reviewed by Dorothy Brown If practicing yoga is a right-brain experience, involving meditation, movement, and a detachment from the everyday, then reading The Science of Yoga is a jolt to the other side of the brain: analytical, historical, scientific, and sobering. But to underscore the proven value of yoga, considered so wifty by so many, New York Times science writer William J. Broad has brought an arsenal of data.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune
During an exercise session, vigorous cardiovascular workouts such as running or biking can typically torch more calories than resistance or strength training. But what happens once the workout is over? Exercise scientists have long debated the wondrous notion of an exercise afterburn, or the body's ability to keep burning calories even after you've showered and returned to your desk. Meanwhile, if such an effect exists, it is not clear which form of exercise - cardio or strength training - has a greater metabolism-boosting potential.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's cancer research institute is suing its former scientific director and a biotechnology company he founded for more than $1 billion, accusing him of stealing intellectual property and trying to profit from it. Craig B. Thompson, who joined Penn in 1999 as scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, led pioneering studies of the metabolism of cancer cells, according to the lawsuit filed...
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hugh McCann pulled up his T-shirt and asked if it was OK to hold in his belly. "That would be cheating," said a nurse as she put a tape measure around his waist. McCann, 49, an out-of-work truck driver from Clifton Heights, was taking part in a University of Pennsylvania study to screen people for metabolic syndrome, a potentially life-threatening but often unrecognized condition that puts people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. He knew nothing about metabolic syndrome until he saw an item in his union newsletter and feared he might fit the bill.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Voorhees-based Kennedy Health System has become the second South Jersey hospital to offer comprehensive newborn screenings to babies born at its hospitals in Stratford and Washington Township. The blood screenings, which began in November, can detect up to 30 metabolic diseases, identifying infants who may have one of a number of rare birth defects. With early diagnosis and treatment, serious illnesses or death resulting from the disorders can often be prevented, said Gwen Heaney-Cutts, the registered nurse who is the corporate director of women's and children's services for Kennedy Health System.
NEWS
October 19, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Tired of all those years of counting calories, passing up Tastykakes and cheesesteaks, but still wondering how much good you're really doing in the battle to lose weight? Now, a little gadget could help clear things up for dieters and fitness fanatics. HealtheTech Inc., a Colorado-based health technology company, this week debuted the BodyGem at the American Dietetic Association Food & Nutrition Conference in Denver. BodyGem is a portable monitor that allows you to measure your metabolism, the process that converts your food to energy and releases wastes.
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