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Meteor

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NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
What some observers described as a meteor streaked across the sky over the eastern United States last night, startling residents and causing a flood of phone calls to police. The aerial display sometime after 7 p.m. was reported over a wide area, including Allentown, the Philadelphia suburbs and Maryland and West Virginia. Some callers told police that they had seen a bluish-green light in the sky. Others said it appeared to be orange. "I just happened to open my front door and this enormous orange fireball with a sputtering tail was moving from north to south," said Richard Lavigne, of Upper Uwchlan Township, Chester County.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Laura Mills, Associated Press
CHELYABINSK, Russia - As a small army of people worked to replace acres of windows shattered by the enormous explosion from a meteor, many joked Saturday about what had happened in this troubled pocket of Russia. One of the most popular jests: Residents of the meteor were terrified to see Chelyabinsk approaching. The fireball that streaked into the sky over this tough industrial city about sunrise Friday was undeniably traumatic. Nearly 1,200 people were reported injured by the shock wave from the explosion, estimated to be as strong as 20 Hiroshima atomic bombs.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Astronomers say that a brilliant light that flashed across the sky in much of the eastern United States on Saturday night was almost certainly the result of a meteor. The celestial spectacle, which began after 7 p.m., was seen in the Philadelphia suburbs and as far away as West Virginia and Maryland. Some callers told police that they had seen a bluish-green light in the sky. Others said the light was orange. Bill Carr, a staff member of the Franklin Institute, said he missed the aerial pyrotechnics, but said the object "sounds like a fireball," a relatively large piece of celestial debris about the size of a fist.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
Area astronomy experts say a brilliant, colorful light streaking across the eastern sky Saturday night was almost definitely a meteor. Dozens of baffled Montgomery County residents notified police about a strange orange and blue celestial ball that flashed through the night air about 7:30 p.m. Montgomery Township police Officer Robert Hart was sitting in his patrol car at the Montgomery Mall when something caught his eye. "It was like...
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This year, the moon will cooperate, and the weather should as well, as one of the year's best shooting star displays reaches its peak Sunday night. "Showers and thunderstorms are expected to become more numerous during Friday into Saturday," with strong winds and rain possibly heavy enough to cause flooding in poor drainage areas, according to a National Weather Service advisory for Eastern Pennsylvania, all of New Jersey and all of Delaware. Typically, the odds are iffy, with a 30 percent chance of rain today, also with possible afternoon thunderstorms, then a 60 percent chance on Friday, 50 percent on Saturday.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you've even glanced at the fine print in a typical homeowners insurance policy, you might have seen reference to damage-causing events that would seem to be, well, out of this world. Events Friday in Russia prompt the now-real question: Does your policy cover meteor strikes? "Insurance companies love to cover things that are unlikely to happen," Bill Wilson, associate vice president of education and research with the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America, said in an e-mail.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
When an unexpected visitor comes crashing into Earth with the force of 20 atomic bombs, Congress sits up and notices. And then schedules a meeting. The House of Representatives heard testimony Tuesday about the meteor that surprised the world Feb. 15 when it lit up the Russian sky with the light of a thousand suns. Neither the head of NASA nor the commander of the Air Force Space Command had comforting words for the congressmen. Rep. Bill Posey (R-Fla.) asked what NASA director Charles F. Bolden Jr. what the space agency could do if, with only three weeks notice, a large asteroid was heading on a collision course with our planet.
NEWS
October 25, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As most everyone knows, a meteor struck Earth with violent force 65 million years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs. The crater was discovered in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula barely 15 years ago, yet already schoolchildren can recite the easy-to-grasp explanation for the end of an epoch. Problem: Gerta Keller thinks it is flat-out wrong. Keller, a Princeton University geoscientist, continued her contrarian quest against the scientific mainstream yesterday, presenting new evidence she says paints a more complicated picture of the dinosaurs' demise.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Jim Heintz and Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - With a blinding flash and a booming shock wave, a meteor blazed across the western Siberian sky Friday and exploded with the force of 20 atomic bombs, injuring more than 1,000 people as it blasted out windows and spread panic in a city of one million. While NASA estimated the meteor was only about the size of a bus and weighed an estimated 7,000 tons, the fireball it produced was dramatic. Video shot by startled residents of the city of Chelyabinsk showed its streaming contrails as it arced toward the horizon just after sunrise, looking like something from a world-ending science-fiction movie.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | Daily News wire services
EL PASO, Texas Flashing meteor puts residents on edge A meteor flashing across the sky yesterday sparked fear through West Texas, where residents flooded police lines with reports of an explosion, a shuddering boom and a burst of smoke. Many whose homes shook feared it was a plane crash. The meteor appeared at 12:47 p.m. as a streak about as bright as the surface of a setting sun, said Robert Simpson, a spokesman for University of Texas' McDonald Observatory. "It was like a chunk of the sun had fallen off and was heading toward the Earth.
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NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
There was a post the other day on Twitter - the most reliable source for news, information, and GIFs of swimming cats - that said a meteor would strike the earth this week and, assuming the two party conventions had not already done so, wipe out all intelligent life on the planet. We can debate exactly how large a meteor would be required to end intelligent life - I'd say one no more than the size of a grapefruit might get the job done - but that would put a crimp in summer cookouts and probably play havoc with Shore traffic.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
First of three parts One year. That's how long it took Flyers prospect Anthony Stolarz to go from stopping pucks in relative obscurity in the barren, second-tier hockey outpost of Corpus Christi, Texas, to starting Game 1 of the Memorial Cup on Canada's biggest junior stage this spring. Oh, and there was a brief, 3-month stay wedged in between there at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. "It's nice to take a look back for a minute and reflect," Stolarz said. "It's been quite a ride.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
DERRICK PITTS, chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute, is a star in his own right, with regular TV and radio gigs and the occasional guest spot with Stephen Colbert or Craig Ferguson. He has also trained for suborbital space flight and is one of NASA's "solar-system ambassadors. " But what he really loves is turning people on to the stars in the night sky. He'll do that in a big way April 26 - the official Astronomy Night for the upcoming Philadelphia Science Fesitval. On Astronomy Night, Pitts and other astronomers will invite Earthlings in Philly to gaze through telescopes around town into the great beyond.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Derrick H. Pitts
By Derrick H. Pitts Considering the recent close calls our planet has had with various asteroids, meteors, and comets, it's time to develop an early-warning system - a cosmic "heads up" - to detect the wanderers zooming through the solar system. The major concern, of course, is whether any of these space travelers is on a collision course with Earth. Our geologic record clearly indicates that not only have we been hit before, but in one instance, the object was large enough to significantly change the planet's environment, triggering the demise of the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago. If they couldn't survive an impact, what chance would mere humans have to survive?
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A possible meteor that blazed briefly but spectacularly across the Friday night sky was reported all along the Eastern seaboard, including the Philadelphia area. On Twitter, Alyson White of Philadelphia excitedly announced that she had seen a "huge shooting star. " "It was crazy," she wrote in an e-mail to The Inquirer. "I saw it at about 7:53. There was green, blue, and white rays coming off of it, and it was soaring through the sky, then it just like exploded and it was gone.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
When an unexpected visitor comes crashing into Earth with the force of 20 atomic bombs, Congress sits up and notices. And then schedules a meeting. The House of Representatives heard testimony Tuesday about the meteor that surprised the world Feb. 15 when it lit up the Russian sky with the light of a thousand suns. Neither the head of NASA nor the commander of the Air Force Space Command had comforting words for the congressmen. Rep. Bill Posey (R-Fla.) asked what NASA director Charles F. Bolden Jr. what the space agency could do if, with only three weeks notice, a large asteroid was heading on a collision course with our planet.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Jim Heintz and Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - With a blinding flash and a booming shock wave, a meteor blazed across the western Siberian sky Friday and exploded with the force of 20 atomic bombs, injuring more than 1,000 people as it blasted out windows and spread panic in a city of one million. While NASA estimated the meteor was only about the size of a bus and weighed an estimated 7,000 tons, the fireball it produced was dramatic. Video shot by startled residents of the city of Chelyabinsk showed its streaming contrails as it arced toward the horizon just after sunrise, looking like something from a world-ending science-fiction movie.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Laura Mills, Associated Press
CHELYABINSK, Russia - As a small army of people worked to replace acres of windows shattered by the enormous explosion from a meteor, many joked Saturday about what had happened in this troubled pocket of Russia. One of the most popular jests: Residents of the meteor were terrified to see Chelyabinsk approaching. The fireball that streaked into the sky over this tough industrial city about sunrise Friday was undeniably traumatic. Nearly 1,200 people were reported injured by the shock wave from the explosion, estimated to be as strong as 20 Hiroshima atomic bombs.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you've even glanced at the fine print in a typical homeowners insurance policy, you might have seen reference to damage-causing events that would seem to be, well, out of this world. Events Friday in Russia prompt the now-real question: Does your policy cover meteor strikes? "Insurance companies love to cover things that are unlikely to happen," Bill Wilson, associate vice president of education and research with the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America, said in an e-mail.
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