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Meteor Shower

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NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
After midnight tonight, the sky over the Delaware Valley is expected to come to life with a meteor a minute streaking silently across the heavens. The Perseid meteor shower will peak tonight, but it is expected to be visible tomorrow night and Saturday night, according to Stephen F. Berr, a science teacher at Colonial Middle School. Berr offered these hints for watching the annual meteor shower: "People should go out to the darkest sky they can find - their own back yard, if they are lucky," said Berr, who has been in charge of the district's planetarium since 1969.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skywatchers will have a chance to view one of the most dazzling displays of meteors in recent years this weekend when the annual Perseid meteor shower paints the summer sky with streaks of light. Viewers in dark areas far from street lights may be able to see 40 to 80 meteors an hour on Sunday and Monday nights, according to Astronomy Magazine. The showers are expected to be unusually spectacular this year because they will occur on moonless nights, making it easier to see them.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the year's best displays of shooting stars is expected to light up the sky tonight through Saturday evening, as the annual Perseid meteor shower reaches its peak. Weather permitting, skywatchers may be able to see 60 or more meteors per hour streaking through the sky between midnight and 3 a.m. this evening. While meteors should be visible all over the sky, they will appear to come from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, astronomers say. "This year's Perseid shower should be better than average," said Stephen O'Meara, associate editor of Sky & Telescope, one of the nation's largest astronomy magazines.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Pam Belluck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was to be one of the astronomical highlights of Burt White's star-gazing career. For a week, he and his wife, Bonnie Ingersoll, had been checking weather reports hoping for a clear sky to see what had been billed as the meteor shower of the century. It wasn't quite that, as things turned out. But last night's display of heavenly fireworks wasn't bad - not for those like White and Ingersoll, who were lucky enough to see the stars through breaks in a vexing cloud cover that obscured the light show for much of the area, and the world.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While many stargazers will make wishes on the hundreds of shooting stars that will light up the sky during the Leonid meteor shower tonight and into tomorrow , satellite operators will be wishing that the meteors don't hit their satellites. Normally, one would see about 15 meteors per hour during the Leonid shower, which occurs about once every 33 years. But this year, scientists predict there will be 200 to 5,000 meteors per hour. And even though the particles are no bigger than grains of sand, their velocity - 45 miles per second - makes them quite dangerous for satellites.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Cordivari unloads what looks like a 5-foot-long white bazooka from his station wagon, patiently sets it up in the middle of the shooting range, and takes dead aim at the sky. Mercifully, for the few other folks already there, it's not a bazooka. It's a 12-inch reflector telescope, and in minutes, he identifies the Hercules cluster and the Northern Cross, which inform a novice astronomer that, no, that's not Venus he is looking at, but Jupiter. "I'm a galaxy hunter," says Cordivari, also an amateur astronomer.
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last November's spectacular Leonid meteor shower is scheduled back for a curtain call tonight and early tomorrow morning, astronomers say. Tonight, the Earth will make one more pass through the dust trail of comet Tempel-Tuttle, whose debris is responsible for the 2001 meteor storm that illuminated the skies even amid the bright lights of the Philadelphia region. The trip through the dust trail will also be a journey into the past: Skywatchers will be able to see comet dust that was shed in the 18th and 19th centuries.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
After midnight tonight, the sky over the Delaware Valley is expected to come to life with a meteor a minute streaking silently across the heavens. The Perseid meteor shower will peak tonight, but it is expected to be visible tomorrow night and Saturday night, according to Stephen F. Berr, a science teacher at Plymouth Whitemarsh Junior High School. Berr offered these hints for watching the annual meteor shower: "People should go out to the darkest sky they can find - their own back yard, if they are lucky," said Berr, who has been in charge of the district's planetarium since 1969.
NEWS
April 25, 2005 | Daily News wire services
At least 37 dead, 200 hurt in Japanese railway crash A crowded commuter train derailed and plowed into an apartment building in western Japan today, killing at least 37 people and injuring some 200 others, officials said. The cause was under investigation, and fears were high the death toll could rise. The seven-car commuter train also hit a car at the crossing near Amagasaki, about 250 miles west of Tokyo. Officials said the cause of the accident was not yet known, but survivors told national broadcaster NHK that the train, carrying 580 passengers, seemed to be moving too fast when it hit a curve near the apartment house.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
It may not be the most exciting shower since the one Janet Leigh took in "Psycho," but tonight's visit of astral neighbors in the annual Perseid meteor shower brings out the romantic in even the most grinding of scientific types. The biggest blast of what are commonly - although incorrectly - known as "shooting stars" comes religiously every Aug. 12. "As the Earth spins in its elliptical orbit, each year at this time it goes through a bunch of debris in its path," said Joyce Towne, an assistant producer for the Fels Planetarium.
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NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Showers and thunderstorms are a worry today and Saturday, but how severe they could be was still unclear this morning. Heavy rain, localized flooding, strong gusts, lightning and small hail are all possible around the region today, with the probabilities for severe weather peaking in afternoon and early evening, according to the National Weather Service. A morning flood advisory kept moving eastward, until, at noon, it covered just Bucks County in Eastern Pennsylvania, and most of New Jersey, as the intensest line of storms had crossed eastward into South Jersey.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The spell of fair weather could end by Saturday evening, as showers, with possible thunderstorms, return to the forecast for several days, from Chester County to the Shore. In Philadelphia, highs today and Saturday should be in the mid to upper 80s under mostly sunny skies, with humidity at comfortable levels. Come Sunday, though, a half-inch or more of rain might fall, and the high could be around the 80 mark - the lowest since June. Tonight's clear skies raise the hopes of anyone hoping to see the year's best meteor shower, the Perseids, as it hits its peak.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | By GREGG PODOLSKI
THIS WEEK marks the DVD release of "An Inconvenient Truth," the blockbuster documentary in which Al Gore explains, in great detail, exactly how he invented the Internet. No, just kidding. It's the film about global warming that had audiences engaged in long, serious discussions about environmental protection while they drove home from the theater in military-issue armored troop transports with bumper stickers that read "Hug a tree. " Thanks to Gore's flick, saving the planet has become cool.
NEWS
April 25, 2005 | Daily News wire services
At least 37 dead, 200 hurt in Japanese railway crash A crowded commuter train derailed and plowed into an apartment building in western Japan today, killing at least 37 people and injuring some 200 others, officials said. The cause was under investigation, and fears were high the death toll could rise. The seven-car commuter train also hit a car at the crossing near Amagasaki, about 250 miles west of Tokyo. Officials said the cause of the accident was not yet known, but survivors told national broadcaster NHK that the train, carrying 580 passengers, seemed to be moving too fast when it hit a curve near the apartment house.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They meet near the woods when the sky is dark and the only earthly light is the occasional firefly. In a clearing, they set up their equipment and search the skies for sights that appear across millions of miles. They are members of the Bucks-Mont Astronomical Association, whose interests are planets, stars, galaxies and the workings of the universe. "Our purpose is to educate the public and ourselves," said George Reagan, the association's vice president and StarWatch chairman.
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some important visitors dropped by the Abington Friends School recently. But despite high security, their appearance was not one of any gravity. In fact, these visitors would not have known gravity if it hit them like a meteor shower. They were travelers from the moon. Small bits of rock and soil, they were snatched from the lunar surface by successive Apollo moon missions from 1969 through the early 1970s. And now they were in Jordan Burkey's physics classroom, silent emissaries from outer space encased in a clear, plastic disk.
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last November's spectacular Leonid meteor shower is scheduled back for a curtain call tonight and early tomorrow morning, astronomers say. Tonight, the Earth will make one more pass through the dust trail of comet Tempel-Tuttle, whose debris is responsible for the 2001 meteor storm that illuminated the skies even amid the bright lights of the Philadelphia region. The trip through the dust trail will also be a journey into the past: Skywatchers will be able to see comet dust that was shed in the 18th and 19th centuries.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It's not the Star in the East over Bethlehem, but an extraordinary celestial display is expected at Christmastide. For those who get to see it - the Philadelphia region's cloudy weather forecast notwithstanding - the three-act pageant will consist of: A meteor shower from the region of the North Star, tonight and early tomorrow. A banner of Northern lights - aurora borealis - also tonight, sparked by a powerful blast of electrified gas that shot off the sun Monday.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While many stargazers will make wishes on the hundreds of shooting stars that will light up the sky during the Leonid meteor shower tonight and into tomorrow , satellite operators will be wishing that the meteors don't hit their satellites. Normally, one would see about 15 meteors per hour during the Leonid shower, which occurs about once every 33 years. But this year, scientists predict there will be 200 to 5,000 meteors per hour. And even though the particles are no bigger than grains of sand, their velocity - 45 miles per second - makes them quite dangerous for satellites.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from the Associated Press
John Glenn and his Discovery crewmates arrived at Kennedy Space Center yesterday as the countdown began for Thursday's scheduled launch. But nature, a comet and technical requirements are putting the space shuttle in a tight squeeze. If things do not go right quickly, Glenn and his six fellow astronauts could be waiting for weeks to make their flight. First, the weather is a potential threat. A high-pressure system sits to the north of the cape, and Hurricane Mitch churns to the south.
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