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Methane

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NEWS
June 12, 1991 | By Larry King and Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Middletown Board of Supervisors last night declared a limited emergency to enable its environmental consultants to enter more than two dozen properties in the Maple Point development in Bucks County, where high levels of methane gas were found last week. Township Manager John J. Burke said the board's action did not indicate that the methane situation had worsened beneath this upscale subdivision in Middletown Township. Rather, it was meant to allow consultants to gain access to homes in three areas of the development for testing and other purposes, he said.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Most people don't walk around thinking about the air they breathe. If they did, a new report that says one of the most powerful contributors to global warming is much more prevalent than previously thought might make them stumble. The ecological villain is methane, a primary component of natural gas, which Stanford University researchers now believe is 50 percent more common in the atmosphere than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had thought. That matters because methane is believed to be 30 times more powerful than carbon dioxide in causing global warming.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Larry King and Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writers
A small swarm of environmental officials, lawyers, consultants and Middletown Township officials poked around yesterday in the notorious back yard of Bucks County resident Marlene Freeman. When they departed, a key question lingered: How much danger - if any - is to be found in the pit of blackened, gassy debris that lies beneath a stretch of the pricey Maple Point subdivision, where the Freeman family lives? A week ago, a private environmental consultant detected explosive levels of methane under the Freemans' back lawn.
NEWS
April 29, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Township Council last night approved a $275,000 bond ordinance to pay for the construction of between 11 and 17 methane extraction wells at the former Kresson Landfill. The wells were recommended by the engineering firm of O'Brien & Gere of Blue Bell, Pa., to extract the poisonous gases at the south side of the landfill located off Parnell Drive. Councilman Leonard Sonnenberg, the lone dissenter among the six council members at the meeting, said that most of the methane has already been removed or has leaked from the landfill and that the extraction system is larger than necessary.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Deep down, the Gulf of Mexico is rich. It is rich in untapped fuel sources, strange geologic formations, and unique sea life, such as a Technicolor blue octopus and 200-year-old tube worms. But it is also rich in danger. To their surprise, scientists who just spent two weeks of deep exploration between Galveston, Texas, and Key West, Fla., aboard the submarine Alvin encountered firsthand an underwater storm as powerful as a hurricane, they reported yesterday. Those types of storms could make it more difficult to exploit their most important finding: that the gulf is truly a gold mine for fuel - oil, gas, and a third fuel form that dwarfs the two others.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concerns that West Conshohocken might be in the path of methane gas that is migrating underground are being raised by borough officials, who fear a repeat of a 1971 explosion. At a Borough Council meeting, council President Joseph Costello questioned Montgomery County public works director Donald Silverson and an environmental consultant about efforts they are making to reduce any danger caused by the gas. "Silverson is going to keep us posted with engineers that are doing a study on it and, hopefully, there will be some answers shortly," Costello said Thursday.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The death of her trees is what Slava Kulikov dreads the most. She planted the row of evergreens surrounding her home almost eight years ago, just after she and her family moved into the Maple Point development in Middletown Township. Last year, she planted a weeping willow in the corner of her back yard as a birthday gift for her husband, Igor. Caring for her greenery is a daily labor of love for Kulikov. "They're like children. You spray them. You take care of them. " This week, her trees will be ripped out of the ground.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After more than two years of negotiations with residents of the Maple Point development, the state Department of Environmental Resources and Middletown Township, Toll Bros. Inc. has completed a remediation plan that details how and when the developer will remove a huge methane-filled pit full of construction debris. The 350-foot-long pit lies beneath the back yards of 11 homes in the Maple Point development in Middletown. Before the work can begin, DER must approve the plan, Middletown Township has to comment on it and residents whose homes surround the pit have to sign an agreement giving the workers access to their property.
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The wind blows westerly over the Cedar Lane cul-de-sac before crossing Interstate 295 and heading toward the Burlington County landfill. Usually that keeps the dump's stench away from the Renkel home. But this winter was unusual. "There were a couple of weeks when we just couldn't stand it," Joseph Renkel said. "The wind didn't help much. It was pretty bad. " The smell was so bad the state fined the county $10,000 in February. The funk has begun to freshen somewhat since county officials adjusted the odor-control system at the landfill complex, which straddles the Florence-Mansfield border.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | By Bill Bell Jr., INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When humans produce methane, folks often want to run and hide. Landfills, however, are another matter. The methane they produce can be profitable. Toro Energy Inc. of Dallas wants to snake a low-pressure methane pipeline 5 1/2 miles from the Pottstown Landfill in West Pottsgrove through Pottstown to the boilers at the Occidental Chemical plant on the other side of town. Toro's proposal has quietly been discussed for about a year, and the company sent letters to the state Department of Environmental Protection and West Pottsgrove Township last month informing them of its plans.
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NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Josh Lederman, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration laid out a blueprint Wednesday for the first regulations to cut down on methane emissions from new natural gas wells, aiming to curb the discharge of a potent greenhouse gas by roughly half. Relying once again on the Clean Air Act, the rules join a host of others that President Obama has ordered in an effort to slow global warming despite opposition to new laws in Congress that has only hardened since the midterm elections. Although just a sliver of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, methane is far more powerful than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
Strike up the band Around Memorial Day, it would be wonderful to hear our country's martial music played in shopping malls, on radio and TV, and elsewhere. Let's give our American spirit a high five. Let's show our men and women in uniform how much we appreciate their service and let other countries see how we Americans honor those who gave their lives to protect our freedom. Dorothy W. Glauser, Mount Royal Presidential cure My fear is that things are not going to get better in Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers ("Obama: Consequences for VA medical flaws," May 22)
NEWS
February 25, 2014
Most people don't walk around thinking about the air they breathe. If they did, a new report that says one of the most powerful contributors to global warming is much more prevalent than previously thought might make them stumble. The ecological villain is methane, a primary component of natural gas, which Stanford University researchers now believe is 50 percent more common in the atmosphere than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had thought. That matters because methane is believed to be 30 times more powerful than carbon dioxide in causing global warming.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residential customers who heat their homes with natural gas may be feeling rather comfy these cold winter days. But for those who feel a tinge of guilt about their carbon footprint, there's a way to ease their conscience. Washington Gas Energy Services Inc. (WGES), a retail energy supplier from Herndon, Va., on Thursday announced a new product for Peco gas customers that will offset the greenhouse emissions they produce by reducing carbon emissions in Pennsylvania. WGES will subsidize methane gas capture projects at landfills in Conestoga, Lebanon, and Scotland, Pa., which it says are verifiable environmental benefits.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - New research in Pennsylvania demonstrates that it's hard to nail down how often natural gas drilling is contaminating drinking water. One study found high levels of methane in some water wells within a half-mile of gas wells, while another found some serious methane pollution occurring naturally far away from drilling. The findings represent a middle ground between critics of the drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing who claim it causes widespread contamination, and an industry that suggests they are rare or nonexistent.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013
In the Region   Pa.: Drilling not to blame in case   Pennsylvania environmental regulators have concluded that Marcellus Shale drilling was not responsible for a high-profile case of methane contamination of private wells in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The state Department of Environmental Protection said it had closed the books on an investigation of the methane migration in Franklin Forks, which anti-drilling celebrities Yoko Ono and Susan Sarandon visited in January.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania environmental regulators on Monday concluded that Marcellus Shale drilling was not responsible for a high-profile case of methane contamination of private water wells in northeastern Pennsylvania. The state Department of Environmental Protection said it has closed the books on an investigation of the methane migration in Franklin Forks, Pa., which anti-drilling celebrities Yoko Ono and Susan Sarandon visited in January. Citing a 125-page consultant's report, DEP says the methane in some residents' wells is naturally occurring shallow gas, not production gas from well drilling.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of self-proclaimed "fracktivists" rallied and marched through Center City on Thursday afternoon, protesting the Shale Gas Insights conference and urging governments at all levels to ban the natural-gas-drilling process known as fracking. Opponents say the hydraulic fracturing process pollutes local aquifers, causes serious health problems, and will result in net job loss. For more than two hours, speakers described what they called adverse effects of the process near their homes.
NEWS
April 7, 2012
9/11 sphere to be moved from park NEW YORK - The 45,000-pound sphere sculpture that emerged largely intact from the rubble of the World Trade Center following the 9/11 attacks faces an uncertain future as officials prepare to remove it from the park where it has been on display for a decade. "The Sphere," originally dedicated as a monument to world peace through trade, became an interim memorial in the months after 9/11. A year after the attacks, Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined Afghan President Hamid Karzai and officials from about 90 foreign nations at its base to light an eternal flame.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Robert Jackson and Avner Vengosh
Last month, Pennsylvania Environmental Protection Secretary Michael Krancer testified before Congress on what he called the "unbiased real facts" of shale-gas exploration. Speaking before the House Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment, he gave four examples of "suspect science" on the safety of hydraulic fracturing to release natural gas. One of the examples he discussed at length was our study at Duke University. Our study with two coworkers, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in May, found no evidence that fracturing fluids had contaminated drinking water, but it did find evidence of higher methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in some drinking-water wells near drilling sites.
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