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Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

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NEWS
October 23, 2007
I THANK the Daily News for finally acknowledging that methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a deadly serious public health problem ("Fighting the 'Super Bug,' " Oct. 22). The bug outwits all but the most powerful drugs. Although MRSA was first associated with health-care institutions (and I applaud Gov. Rendell for forcing hospitals to get serious about reducing infections), MRSA is emerging as a cause of dangerous skin infections among young athletes at every level.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Martin Luther King High School football player has died after contracting methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a contagious infection becoming more common in schools and gyms. Saalen Jones, a 17-year-old senior, died Tuesday at Albert Einstein Medical Center, said Fernando Gallard, a spokesman for the Philadelphia School District. The teenager's father took him to Einstein after finding him semiconscious in bed. The teenager, who had complained of neck pain, died the same day. Yesterday, the results of an exam conducted to determine cause of death indicated that Jones had died of MRSA.
NEWS
October 23, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City health officials said yesterday they had found a single case of a child with MRSA, or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, at Pastorius Elementary School in Germantown. The child has not attended school in more than a week and is receiving treatment, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. He said the department began investigating after reports surfaced yesterday that two Pastorius students were suspected of contracting the staph infection.
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chichester education officials sent a letter home to families that urged health precautions after a high school student was diagnosed with a skin infection known as MRSA. The initials stand for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus - a type of bacteria that's resistant to antibiotics. It often appears as pimples and boils. The high school canceled after-school activities yesterday, but planned to open on time this morning after a thorough overnight scrubbing. The letter instructed families to take preventative measures such as frequently washing their hands, and urged them to report rashes or sores to a physician.
SPORTS
October 16, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Health and sports officials are warning schools and sports teams about a hard-to-treat skin infection once common to hospitals and prisons that's now plaguing athletes on the playing field. The National Federation of State High School Associations sent a warning Tuesday to states about a staph infection that can't be cured by the usual penicillin-related antibiotics. On Monday, the NCAA's medical committee urged college athletic departments to be alert for the infections and to practice careful hygiene.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
SUPER BUGS, resistant strains and hospital-acquired infections. Oh, my. News reports are crawling with detailed stories of these sickening strains of infectious microbes that are cropping up in schools, locker rooms and especially in hospitals. The MRSA outbreak at Chichester High School brought it all home for us this week. MRSA, mercifully short for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is just the most prominent of a class of preventable infections that often get passed along on the hands of health-care workers.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | By Dave Turner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucks County has settled a lawsuit filed by a former county jail inmate involving an outbreak of an antibiotic-resistant infection at the jail in 2001 and 2002. The former inmate will receive a $150,000 settlement - half from the county and half from its insurance company - as part of a deal reached on Friday, according to Guy Matthews, the county solicitor. He said resolutions have been reached in about half of the 10 or so lawsuits related to the flesh-eating infection known as MRSA at the jail.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cleaning crews sanitized Council Rock High School South from top to bottom Saturday after last week's discovery of a skin infection among some members of the school's football and soccer teams. School personnel, assisted by the maintenance contractor, Aramark, used disinfectants to tackle water fountains, doorknobs, and railings. They paid particular attention to locker rooms, the weight room, showers, and the cafeteria. In a letter e-mailed to parents Sunday night, school Superintendent Mark J. Klein said "two cases of impetigo - one in a soccer player and one in a football player" were confirmed Thursday.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
With schools in Philadelphia about to reopen, City Councilman Jack Kelly yesterday issued an alert on a staph infection that on rare occasions can become deadly. Kelly called a news conference outside City Hall to issue a warning about the dangers of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA). As its name implies, the bacteria infection that starts out as a boil on the skin is resistant to antibiotics. "This is a deadly serious public- health problem," said Kelly.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach: Decontaminating every patient in intensive care. Washing everyone with antiseptic wipes and giving them antibiotic nose ointment reduced bloodstream infections dramatically in the study at more than 40 U.S. hospitals. The practice could prove controversial, because it would involve even uninfected patients and because experts say it could lead to germs becoming more resistant to antibiotics.
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NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach: Decontaminating every patient in intensive care. Washing everyone with antiseptic wipes and giving them antibiotic nose ointment reduced bloodstream infections dramatically in the study at more than 40 U.S. hospitals. The practice could prove controversial, because it would involve even uninfected patients and because experts say it could lead to germs becoming more resistant to antibiotics.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cleaning crews sanitized Council Rock High School South from top to bottom Saturday after last week's discovery of a skin infection among some members of the school's football and soccer teams. School personnel, assisted by the maintenance contractor, Aramark, used disinfectants to tackle water fountains, doorknobs, and railings. They paid particular attention to locker rooms, the weight room, showers, and the cafeteria. In a letter e-mailed to parents Sunday night, school Superintendent Mark J. Klein said "two cases of impetigo - one in a soccer player and one in a football player" were confirmed Thursday.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Martin Luther King High School football player has died after contracting methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a contagious infection becoming more common in schools and gyms. Saalen Jones, a 17-year-old senior, died Tuesday at Albert Einstein Medical Center, said Fernando Gallard, a spokesman for the Philadelphia School District. The teenager's father took him to Einstein after finding him semiconscious in bed. The teenager, who had complained of neck pain, died the same day. Yesterday, the results of an exam conducted to determine cause of death indicated that Jones had died of MRSA.
NEWS
October 23, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City health officials said yesterday they had found a single case of a child with MRSA, or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, at Pastorius Elementary School in Germantown. The child has not attended school in more than a week and is receiving treatment, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. He said the department began investigating after reports surfaced yesterday that two Pastorius students were suspected of contracting the staph infection.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
I THANK the Daily News for finally acknowledging that methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a deadly serious public health problem ("Fighting the 'Super Bug,' " Oct. 22). The bug outwits all but the most powerful drugs. Although MRSA was first associated with health-care institutions (and I applaud Gov. Rendell for forcing hospitals to get serious about reducing infections), MRSA is emerging as a cause of dangerous skin infections among young athletes at every level.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
SUPER BUGS, resistant strains and hospital-acquired infections. Oh, my. News reports are crawling with detailed stories of these sickening strains of infectious microbes that are cropping up in schools, locker rooms and especially in hospitals. The MRSA outbreak at Chichester High School brought it all home for us this week. MRSA, mercifully short for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is just the most prominent of a class of preventable infections that often get passed along on the hands of health-care workers.
NEWS
October 19, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chichester education officials sent a letter home to families that urged health precautions after a high school student was diagnosed with a skin infection known as MRSA. The initials stand for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus - a type of bacteria that's resistant to antibiotics. It often appears as pimples and boils. The high school canceled after-school activities yesterday, but planned to open on time this morning after a thorough overnight scrubbing. The letter instructed families to take preventative measures such as frequently washing their hands, and urged them to report rashes or sores to a physician.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
With schools in Philadelphia about to reopen, City Councilman Jack Kelly yesterday issued an alert on a staph infection that on rare occasions can become deadly. Kelly called a news conference outside City Hall to issue a warning about the dangers of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA). As its name implies, the bacteria infection that starts out as a boil on the skin is resistant to antibiotics. "This is a deadly serious public- health problem," said Kelly.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | By Dave Turner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucks County has settled a lawsuit filed by a former county jail inmate involving an outbreak of an antibiotic-resistant infection at the jail in 2001 and 2002. The former inmate will receive a $150,000 settlement - half from the county and half from its insurance company - as part of a deal reached on Friday, according to Guy Matthews, the county solicitor. He said resolutions have been reached in about half of the 10 or so lawsuits related to the flesh-eating infection known as MRSA at the jail.
SPORTS
October 16, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Health and sports officials are warning schools and sports teams about a hard-to-treat skin infection once common to hospitals and prisons that's now plaguing athletes on the playing field. The National Federation of State High School Associations sent a warning Tuesday to states about a staph infection that can't be cured by the usual penicillin-related antibiotics. On Monday, the NCAA's medical committee urged college athletic departments to be alert for the infections and to practice careful hygiene.
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