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NEWS
November 12, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Dr. J. Hillman Coffee Sr., 79, longtime pastor in the Southern New Jersey United Methodist Conference, died Monday at West Jersey Hospital-Marlton. He was born and raised in Collingswood, where he was a 1935 graduate of Collingswood High School. He played clarinet in the school band. He was a Tabernacle resident for the last 13 years. Mr. Coffee last served as pastor of the Beach Haven Terrace United Methodist Church and Beach Haven Kynet United Methodist Church, both on Long Beach Island, for nine years before retiring in 1984.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Arthur Brandenburg, 81, of University City, executive director of the West Philadelphia Fund for Human Development in the 1980s, died Sunday, July 15, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Brandenburg was pastor of the First United Methodist Church of Germantown from 1970 to 1973, a pastor at Calvary United Methodist Church in West Philadelphia from 1973 to 1985, and pastor of Bala Cynwyd United Methodist Church from 1991 to 1996. As one of four pastors at Calvary, he helped direct the Fund for Human Development, which rehabilitated houses and developed job opportunities.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | By Dave Urbanski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. William C. Howard, 92, of Pitman, who ministered in Methodist churches throughout much of South Jersey for 57 years, died Monday at South Jersey Hospital Systems/Elmer Division. Mr. Howard was ordained in 1928 after graduating from the National Bible Institute in New York City. He preached in churches in Browns Mills, Medford, Gloucester City, Bridgeton, Vineland, Somers Point and Long Branch, as well as in Reyburn, Pa. After his retirement in 1975, he served as a substitute minister in Cape May and Atlantic County churches for 10 years.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - A Methodist church panel on Friday weighed whether to reinstate Frank Schaefer, the Pennsylvania pastor defrocked after he officiated at his gay son's wedding, with some members making clear they questioned the penalty's legality under church law. During the hearing, the members grilled the pastor who prosecuted Schaefer's case about the punishment and how it was imposed, including whether Schaefer, of Lebanon, Pa., could be disciplined for...
NEWS
March 4, 2007 | By Kerry O'Connor FOR THE INQUIRER
The message that the Rev. Jeff Hulet preaches at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Riverside and Christ Episcopal Church in Palmyra is simple: Spirituality is a process. Nobody knows better than Hulet. Before graduating from the General Theological Seminary in Manhattan last May, the vicar - well into his 50s - was a lieutenant in the Los Angeles Police Department. And he was a Methodist. "I grew up in the Midwest as a Methodist," Hulet said during an interview in his office at St. Stephen's.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When devout Methodists started meeting each summer here 123 years ago, a tent-covered rectangular platform served as a pulpit for some of the most famous preachers, evangelists and holiness workers of the Victorian era. By 1873, a Pennsylvania Dutch-style pole barn had supplanted the platform. The white wooden auditorium stood as an open-air centerpiece among camp-style cottages extending out in 12 directions, representing the number of God's apostles. From this axis, the orators inspired thousands to travel from Camden, Philadelphia and South Jersey each summer by horse-drawn wagons or via the West Jersey Railroad's "Camp Meeting Express" to hear God's word.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Carl W. Halvorsen was a pastor to Methodist congregations in South Jersey for four decades, and a devoted man of God for far longer. Yet that didn't stop him from engaging the Almighty from time to time in some stern, even impertinent, conversations. In recent years, many were about his wife, Marcella, stricken with Parkinson's disease and then a stroke. He not only asked the proverbial question - why do bad things happen to good people? - but wrestled with the paucity of answers he got back.
NEWS
January 20, 2004 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Doylestown United Methodist Church yesterday morning, about two dozen grammar school children were building birdhouses. The children will take their birdhouses to friends, to tell them something about Habitat for Humanity, the agency sponsoring that effort. At neighboring Temple Judea, on Route 313 near Route 202, another two dozen children were sewing small quilts. They will be given to children in need, such as cancer sufferers who might clutch them while enduring chemotherapy.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Texas Gov. George W. Bush has lauded faith-based institutions as examples of the "compassionate conservatism" that has been his rallying cry throughout his presidential campaign. All the more reason, say members of Philadelphia's faith community, that they will make their voices heard when the Republican National Convention comes to town this week. Only problem is, they may drown one another out. Religious leaders have scheduled round-the-clock events - from special worship services and prayer vigils to panel discussions and demonstrations - all with the intention of bringing national attention to what they say is a universal message.
SPORTS
August 24, 2000 | By Jay Nagle, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tiger Woods wasn't the only one to find a groove on the golf course this summer. Bill Fitzgerald, who completed an all-Catholic career at Archbishop Ryan two months ago, won three junior events - one in June, one in July, and one in August - before starting his college career Friday at Division III powerhouse Methodist (N.C.) College Fitzgerald started the summer by capturing the Pennsylvania Tour of Champions Invitational at the Hershey Country Club South Course on June 27. Fitzgerald, a 5-foot-8, 150-pounder, shot a 1-under-par 70 to best a field of 60 players by 5 strokes.
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SPORTS
February 5, 2016
TEMPLE 55, SOUTHERN METHODIST 35 Erica Covile had 13 points and 10 rebounds as the Owls prevailed in the offensively-challenged American Athletic Conference game Wednesday afternoon at the Liacouras Center. Donnaizha Fountain scored 14 points to lead Temple (14-7, 8-2), which led by as many as 28 early in the fourth quarter. Alliya Butts was held to six points, but notched four assists and five steals. Covile added three steals. Dai'ja Thomas (12) was the only player in double figures for SMU (9-12, 4-6)
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writers
Hareem Ismail picked up her 9-year-old daughter from school three hours early Friday, dropped off the girl at a relative's home, and headed to City Hall to do something she had never done before: Demonstrate. Ismail, a Muslim from Pakistan who has lived in the United States for 13 years, now residing in Downingtown, said she felt compelled to speak up for her faith to counter hate speech aimed at Muslim Americans, which she said has grown "out of control. " Ismail was amid about 75 others: A dentist from Moorestown.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
IT'S BEEN years since Ocean City, N.J., proclaimed itself "America's Greatest Family Resort. " But it's been many more years - 136, to be precise - since four Methodist ministers set up a camp meeting beneath cedars and named streets after their denomination's prominent leaders. They called their al fresco spiritual outpost "the Tabernacle. " That tamed land still belongs to "the Tab," a nonprofit charged with upholding island tradition and drawing some of the town's 120,000 summer visitors away from the beach and into ample theater seats.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOANNE GIOVANETTI had an important job at Methodist Hospital - getting the money. "She would say, 'I'll find the money, I'll get the money for you,' " said Barbara Rubino, Joanne's supervisor at Methodist. "And she always did. "It was a challenge for her. She loved the investigation work. " Joanne, who was in billing at Methodist Hospital for 37 years, often had a quirky way of getting things done, both at home and on the job. She did things her own way, her family said. It wasn't always the customary way, the most acceptable way, or the most diplomatic way, but it was her way and, of most importance, it worked.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former Lebanon, Pa., Methodist minister who was defrocked for officiating at his gay son's wedding and later reinstated says the issue does not seem as contentious in Pennsylvania now that gay marriage is legal in the state. Frank Schaefer, who became a national symbol for church reform on the issue, returned to the state Saturday to host an inclusivity conference at a Montgomery County church. "When the legislation changes, it changes people and attitudes," Schaefer said. He said that since gay marriage became legal in Pennsylvania, he had not seen protests when he speaks here, as he had in the past.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Schaefer, the former Lebanon, Pa., pastor defrocked and then reinstated after officiating at his gay son's wedding, has cleared his final legal hurdle. The United Methodist Church's highest judicial board on Monday said Schaefer can keep his ministerial credentials, bringing closure to a case that last year led to some calls for a schism. The Judicial Council, in a decision issued following a hearing last week in Memphis, did not weigh in on the denomination's ban on gay marriage, ruling on technical grounds.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Frank Schaefer, recently reinstated as a Methodist minister after losing his credentials for presiding over his gay son's wedding, has one more legal battle ahead. The Methodist Church is appealing his reinstatement to its highest judicial board, according to Schaefer. Schaefer, formerly of Lebanon, Pa., and now working as a minister in California, said he wasn't surprised by the move. He said it worried him, but he also sees it as an opportunity for the LGBT cause. "I think it will be great if we could win this," he said.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another church trial over a same-sex wedding could be on the horizon locally for the United Methodist Church - this time with 36 defendants and reverberations in congregations across the region. Accused of breaking doctrinal law are the pastors who jointly performed a same-sex wedding last year in Philadelphia in solidarity with the Rev. Frank Schaefer, the Lebanon, Pa., pastor put on trial for presiding at his gay son's wedding. A complaint against those 36 ministers was filed by a group of about 50 members, mostly clergy, of the church's eastern Pennsylvania Conference, according to those with knowledge of the confidential process.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Schaefer's battle may not be over. A Methodist church panel on Tuesday found that the pastor from Lebanon, Pa., was wrongly defrocked for officiating at his son's gay wedding. While Schaefer celebrated and planned a move to California for a new job as a full-time minister, the church's prosecutor was contemplating an appeal to the Judicial Council, its highest appeals body. That step would extend the national attention on a debate over same-sex marriage in the United Methodist Church, and could deepen divides within the denomination.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
Frank Schaefer on Tuesday was reinstated as a Methodist minister by a church panel that found the Pennsylvania pastor was wrongly defrocked in December for officiating at his son's gay wedding. A committee of lay church members and clergy said Schaefer's sentence unjustly required a promise to uphold the church's laws in the future if he wished to receive back his ministering credentials at the end of a suspension. "Our clergy can only be punished for what they have been convicted of doing in the past, not for what they may or may not do in the future," the decision stated.
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