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Mexican Cuisine

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NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Authentic Mexican cuisine is rarely found in this region but is one of many good things about Tamarindo's in Broad Axe. Others are fabulous food, enormous portions, reasonable prices and attentive, friendly service. What else can we ask? Tamarindo's replaced La Gianna's, a fine Italian restaurant in the Homemaker's Shopping Plaza. While we should lament the loss of La Gianna's, we can exult in its successor. The food is real Mexican cuisine, not the Tex-Mex tacos and enchiladas that too often pass for Mexican cuisine in this region.
FOOD
April 12, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Richard Condon, author of Ole Mole! Great Recipes in the Classic Mexican Tradition (Taylor Publishing, $9.95), traces Mexican cuisine back to a time that predates the Incas. He describes its development as 10,000 to 12,000 years of "chewing and tasting" that brought together a variety of ingredients and cooking styles. Condon, whose books include The Manchurian Candidate and Prizzi's Honor, has written this well-balanced look at Mexican food with his daughter, Wendy Condon, considered by many to be an expert at cooking Mexican dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
HE HAD ME at, "It's Le Bec Mex. " That's how Chef Adan Saavedra describes his "Mexican haute cuisine," a melding of French cooking technique with Mexican ingredients. He says its origins are as old as the Franco-Mexican War in the 1860s and can be traced to Maximilian I. After a 10-year run in the Northeast, Chef Adan Saavedra has moved his restaurant, Paloma, south to 8th Street in the Italian Market, which is also becoming its own cultural fusion. At first glance this "Le Bec Mex" seems an improbable blending of styles that could lead to fusion confusion on the plate.
FOOD
August 20, 1989 | By Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Inquirer
"It was so physically beautiful in Mexico 30 years ago," says Diana Kennedy, pouring a shot of peppery Herradura Azul tequila for her guests. "It looked like it would last forever - the forests, the mountains, the wonderfully clear air. You could see the volcanoes every night then. When you read (stories about Mexico by) D. H. Lawrence and all the early writers, you realize they were captured by this magical feeling. " Mexico still seems magical, at least from the vantage point of the massive wooden kitchen table in Kennedy's five-level adobe home, in the mountains 2 1/ 2 hours west of Mexico City.
FOOD
August 24, 1994 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The image of Mexican food as mostly melted cheese, guacamole and sour cream piled on fried tortilla chips is more a reflection of American appetites than it is of real Mexican food. There's nothing inherently wrong healthwise with Mexican cooking - or Italian, or Chinese - though reports of restaurant food surveys made by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) might suggest otherwise. The latest survey, an indictment of meals from mid-priced Mexican restaurants that CSPI said had as much as 1 1/2 times the daily recommended fat quota, appears in the current issue of the Washington-based consumer- advocacy group's Nutrition Action Healthletter magazine.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
The theme at Pennsbury High earlier this month could have been "Better Understanding Through Food," as students baked, cooked and brought the food for an international buffet in the school cafeteria. Offerings included French, German and Mexican cuisine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THIS TIME OF year it's easy to work up an appetite standing in line in the Italian Market. One of the options for an inexpensive recharge is one block south of Washington on 9th Street at Moctezuma Restaurant. Here you'll find a pick-me-up gordita, quick Mexican sandwich or leisurely dinner. Yes, Moctezuma is an unfortunate name for some of us who may have bad south of the border vacation memories. Put those aside, though. Owned by the familia Hernandez, Moctezuma is an expression of their Mexican cuisine and ancient culture.
FOOD
September 7, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
A day in the working life of Arnulfo Luengas can sometimes be 18 hours of menu planning, food shopping, and hands-on food preparation in the huge Mexico City kitchen of Banamex, Mexico's national bank. Luengas, 59, is the bank's executive chef, and along with direct supervision of the employee and executive restaurants in Mexico City, he's in charge of the conglomerate's food operations throughout Mexico. On any given day he might also prepare haute Mexican cuisine for high- ranking government officials and members of the international banking community.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
What we like: Mole poblano (chicken in a spicy brown sauce), and queso fundido with chorizo (melted cheese with spicy sausage). What it offers: Customers who sit down for a taste of the Mexican food at Pancho Villa Mexican Grill won't find the kind of Americanized cuisine that translates into a crunchy taco. This bright and cheery restaurant specializes in "authentic" Mexican food, owner Luis Marin said. That means no taco salad with a glop of sour cream on top. What it does mean is comforting, spicy and flavorful cuisine served in a setting named for a Mexican revolutionary and folk hero.
FOOD
February 23, 1992 | By Michael Roberts, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The search for pepper brought the first Europeans to the New World. Instead of pepper, the Spaniards found, among the great civilizations of Central and South America, a cuisine based on corn and beans, with some birds, seafood and iguana thrown in. They discovered, and took back to the Old World, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, turkey, chocolate, vanilla and chilies - but no pepper. Today, Mexican cuisine is the result of the collision of the European and Aztec civilizations. When most North Americans today talk about Mexican food, we think of enchiladas and burritos - Mexican street food, or snacks, basically corn tortillas filled with a little cheese or meat and moistened with some sauce.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 28, 2012 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
HAMMONTON, N.J. - Long touted as "the blueberry capital of the world," this Pinelands town is rapidly gaining another distinction: taco capital of South Jersey. With no fewer than half a dozen restaurants and trucks dotting the downtown streetscape, Hammonton - just a short jaunt off the Atlantic City Expressway - has become a destination for those craving everything from a humble soul-food menudo stew to crispy tostadas de tinga or unapologetic Tex-Mex. And in a decidedly new chapter for this traditionally Italian agricultural enclave, the civic forces have lately embraced these Mexican kitchens as a much-needed jolt of energy to revitalize the downtown, helping to market businesses like Roberto Diaz's El Mariachi Loco to a wider audience.
FOOD
June 23, 2011 | By Linda Zavoral, Contra Costa Times
Chicago chef Rick Bayless, this country's best-known interpreter of Mexican cuisine - winner of numerous James Beard Awards and cookbook honors, plus the very first Top Chef Masters title - is fresh off a Baja project and ready to share his enthusiasm for beachy dishes and cocktails. We caught up with him on a busy afternoon. Here is an edited version of that chat. Question: Any new projects? Have you been to Mexico recently? Answer: Yes, I just finished a new series for public TV, the eighth season of Mexico: One Plate at a Time . I will be focusing entirely on the Baja Peninsula.
FOOD
February 3, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Downtown Wayne is getting a burst of Latin excitement from the new Matador (110 N. Wayne Ave., 610-688-6282). Matt Pressler, a Culinary Institute of America grad who worked in Scottsdale, Ariz. (La Hacienda, Marquesa) before coming home to open La Taverna and Crazy Cactus in Phoenixville, is pairing Spanish and Mexican cuisines at the former Freehouse. There are street-level and upper-level bars, and its low-lit, wood-and-wrought-iron environs have more bullfighting paintings than you can shake a red cape at. Pressler says he became enthralled with "earthy" Spanish cuisine at CIA. He decided to offer Mexican dishes (quesadillas and carne asada, for example)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
HE HAD ME at, "It's Le Bec Mex. " That's how Chef Adan Saavedra describes his "Mexican haute cuisine," a melding of French cooking technique with Mexican ingredients. He says its origins are as old as the Franco-Mexican War in the 1860s and can be traced to Maximilian I. After a 10-year run in the Northeast, Chef Adan Saavedra has moved his restaurant, Paloma, south to 8th Street in the Italian Market, which is also becoming its own cultural fusion. At first glance this "Le Bec Mex" seems an improbable blending of styles that could lead to fusion confusion on the plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THIS TIME OF year it's easy to work up an appetite standing in line in the Italian Market. One of the options for an inexpensive recharge is one block south of Washington on 9th Street at Moctezuma Restaurant. Here you'll find a pick-me-up gordita, quick Mexican sandwich or leisurely dinner. Yes, Moctezuma is an unfortunate name for some of us who may have bad south of the border vacation memories. Put those aside, though. Owned by the familia Hernandez, Moctezuma is an expression of their Mexican cuisine and ancient culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2008 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
LEAVE IT to Jose Garces to capture the crazy, wonderful, delicious world of Mexico City's cuisine under one roof. He's done exactly that at Distrito, the energetic two-story space he recently opened at 3945 Chestnut St. in West Philadelphia. "What I love about Mexico City is how it can be so urban, with street food everywhere, and so sophisticated at the same time. There's two different spectrums in terms of food," said Garces, who, along with his culinary and design team, spent eight days chowing his way through the city in February.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
What we like: Mole poblano (chicken in a spicy brown sauce), and queso fundido with chorizo (melted cheese with spicy sausage). What it offers: Customers who sit down for a taste of the Mexican food at Pancho Villa Mexican Grill won't find the kind of Americanized cuisine that translates into a crunchy taco. This bright and cheery restaurant specializes in "authentic" Mexican food, owner Luis Marin said. That means no taco salad with a glop of sour cream on top. What it does mean is comforting, spicy and flavorful cuisine served in a setting named for a Mexican revolutionary and folk hero.
NEWS
November 6, 2005 | Inquirer staff
What we like about it: Authentic Mexican cooking with wonderful hand-rolled fresh tortillas and a mix of tradition and innovation throughout the menu, from the little panuchos - small fresh tortillas topped with pulled pork in a savory sauce - to the amazing, creamy carrot sopa that was the soup of the day. At a recent lunch, we chose huaraches (sandals), a thick corn dough rolled to form a shallow dish for the chicken, black bean and salsa filling. Topped with lettuce, tomato, onion and fresco cheese, it is a delicate mingling of traditional flavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | By BECKY BATCHA For the Daily News
BELLA VISTA is way over mob guys, red sauce and Sinatra. These days, the talk of the neighborhood around the 9th Street Italian Market is "location, location, location" as a real estate craze transforms rowhouses into gold mines. The old-timers are scratching their heads. "Three hundred thousand dollars for a townhouse? Hello? This is South Philly," said one. But the pleasures of visiting Bella Vista are still cheap: the market, the old Italian ways, the vibrant new Vietnamese and Mexican presence.
FOOD
May 1, 2002 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
It happened in Mexico on the fifth of May, 140 years ago Sunday. But many of us don't know why the event is still celebrated today. Cinco de Mayo is not Mexican Independence Day. And it should not be an excuse to marinate our neurons in Dos Equis beer. It's about pride. "On the fifth of May, Mexico rejected a foreign invader from France, and the date has become a celebration of Mexican nationalism," said Miguel Angel Corzo, president of the University of the Arts and a native of Mexico City.
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