CollectionsMexico
IN THE NEWS

Mexico

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
August 12, 2012 | Associated Press
Oribe Peralta scored just 29 seconds into the Olympic final and added another goal in the second half to help Mexico stun Brazil, 2-1, Saturday at Wembley and win its first gold in men's soccer. Peralta took advantage of a mistake by the Brazilian defense in the game's opening minute and slotted a low right-foot shot into the net. It was the fastest Olympic goal in at least 36 years, since FIFA began keeping record of the competition. The striker added the second with a firm header from a free kick in the 75th.
NEWS
June 19, 1986
What is Jesse Helms trying to prove? Everyone knows by now that Sen. Helms (R., N.C.) operates according to his own foreign policy agenda in the Senate. Past hijinks - like inviting a Salvadoran death squad leader to Congress or holding key Defense and State Department appointees hostage to his demands - showed a man bent on pushing his ideology, not promoting U.S. interests. But his current vendetta against Mexico - which he's waging in public Senate hearings as chairman of the Foreign Relations subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere - has surpassed the bounds of legislative inquiry or dissent.
SPORTS
October 25, 1996 | By Roger Allaway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During his time as U.S. national team coach, from 1991 to 1995, Bora Milutinovic had the reputation of being regarded nearly as a saint in Mexico, which he coached to the quarterfinals of the 1986 World Cup. Now, with Milutinovic back in charge of the Mexican national team, that sainthood is wearing thin. Mexico, like the United States, is playing in a semifinal-round group this fall of the CONCACAF section of World Cup qualifying. It was expected to have a fairly easy time advancing to next year's CONCACAF final round, but it hasn't worked out that way. Halfway through this fall's competition, Mexico is involved in a frantic three-way race with Jamaica and Honduras for two places in next year's competition.
SPORTS
August 25, 2011 | Associated Press
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Ben Askelson hit a high 0-1 curveball onto the hill beyond the left-field fence to send the boys from Billings, Mont., into the U.S. final of the Little League World Series with a 1-0, seven-inning victory over Huntington Beach, Calif., on Wednesday night. Montana gets to rest up until the U.S. championship game Saturday, while California must face Clinton County, Pa., on Thursday night. Both teams had chances to prevent the game from going into extra innings.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Bob Christie, Cristina Silva, and Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
PHOENIX - The weeklong detention of an American woman after Mexican authorities said they found 12 pounds of marijuana under her bus seat illustrates just one of the perils Americans face while traveling in Mexico. Yanira Maldonado, 42, walked out of a prison on the outskirts of Nogales, Mexico, and into her husband's arms late Thursday after a judge dismissed drug-smuggling charges against her. The judge determined Maldonado was no longer a suspect after viewing video that showed the couple climbing onto the bus with just a purse, blankets, and bottles of water.
NEWS
July 11, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
What is it with Mexico lately? When did it hire David Duke as an image consultant? I can't imagine what else might explain that nation's recent blundering into not just one but two racially charged controversies. The first, of course, was President Vicente Fox's remark in May that Mexican immigrants in the United States take work "not even blacks" are willing to do. Fox's comment outraged many in this country and bestirred the readily bestirrable Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson to go down and show him the error of his ways.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
The government of Mexico and the International Monetary Fund have agreed on a new economic plan that will lead to $1.5 billion in new loans from the IMF over the next 18 months, officials said yesterday. The agreement, reached after weeks of negotiations, was to be formalized today in a ceremony at the Mexican Embassy in Washington, according to Embassy spokesman Leonardo Ffrench. Commercial bankers have regarded an agreement between Mexico and the IMF as a necessity before they will enter full-scale negotiations over new lending to Mexico.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
With dozens of people believed buried alive in mudslides, rescue workers struggled yesterday to reach remote towns in southern and central Mexico, where flooding brought on by more than a week of rain has killed at least 140 people. Government officials said the death toll was certain to rise as reports come in from towns now cut off from the outside world. Flooding sent rivers roaring over their banks across the southern and central half of Mexico. More than 157,000 people have been forced from their homes.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By Sally Shelton Colby, Washington Post
Japan, everybody's favorite whipping boy, has a new competitor: Mexico. Washington policy-makers make headlines alleging Mexican government involvement in drug trafficking. Conservatives in the United States bemoan Mexico's coziness with Cuba and Nicaragua and castigate Mexico's penchant for anti-U.S. rhetoric. Liberals in the United States describe Mexico's one-party political system as disguised authoritarianism and lament its use of fraud and force to retain power. Businessmen and bankers criticize Mexico's economic disarray.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | By Christopher Marquis, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Lawmakers who voted last week to give President Bush authority to negotiate a free-trade agreement with Mexico look fondly on a southern neighbor that has privatized industry, opened doors to U.S. investors and improved relations with Washington. Critics see another side: an authoritarian nation haunted by corruption and endemic torture and in the grip of a party that routinely resorts to electoral fraud. "We are for the first time being asked to consider a free-trade agreement with a country that is not free," Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 21, 2016
Answer: Roswell. The long-running festival (the next one is June 29-July 2) was sparked by the July 1947 UFO Incident. A mysterious flying object crashed on a ranch north of Roswell and was first identified as a "flying disc" and later as a weather balloon. Ever since, conspiracy theories have raged.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
In Mexico, people are puzzled by the U.S. presidential campaigns. It's not just the border wall. Like Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton has lately criticized free trade, which has grown between the two countries since her husband signed the GOP-backed North American Free Trade Agreement of 1995. That deal made it possible to sell GM cars, Hershey chocolates, and many other once-forbidden U.S. products south of Texas. Such Northeast Philly manufacturers as Nabisco and Cardone went on to move more low-wage work to Mexico, cutting costs and prices and benefiting exporters and consumers on both sides, and some workers.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., with North America headquarters in North Wales, Montgomery County, said Thursday that it bought Mexican drug maker Rimsa for $2.3 billion. Under the deal, Teva will become a leading pharmaceutical company in Mexico, which is the second largest market in Latin America and among the top five "emerging" markets worldwide, the company said. Teva, the world's largest maker of generic versions of brand-name medicines, employs more than 2,000 in North Wales, Horsham, Frazer, West Chester, and New Britain.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Cardone is downsizing again. The auto-parts rebuilder, which calls itself Philadelphia's largest remaining manufacturer, will shift 1,336 jobs from its brake caliper plants at 5501 Whitaker Ave. and 5670 Rising Sun Ave. to Matamoros, Mexico, just south of Cardone's warehouses in Brownsville, Texas, over the next two years. The company, which has been shifting jobs for years from Northeast Philadelphia to the Texas-Mexico border region, told the Pennsylvania Department of Labor last month about the plan for layoffs.
FOOD
February 12, 2016
Like a lot of new restaurants, Tio Flores is still working out the kinks. Several of them, in fact. This fun and colorful Mexican-theme project at 16th and South Streets, from the owners of Hawthornes and the Cambridge, is especially prone to overusing its "Tio spice," an orange powder that gives everything from the tortilla chips to the taco-shell salad bowl the salty aspect of Dorito cuisine. As much as I dislike that choice, with no plain chips available, there is one great dish here I can't stop thinking about - the New Mexico pork chile, which isn't exactly presented like a traditional stew, either.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
When the SeaLand Atlantico cargo ship arrived at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia before dawn Thursday, it was the first time that fresh produce, meat, beer, and electronics traveled directly from the Gulf of Mexico to Philadelphia on an ocean route. Until now, the historic mode for getting limes, avocados, tomatoes, onions, and peppers from the Mexican ports of Veracruz and Altamira to the East Coast has been by truck - through long lines at border crossings and across congested highways.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
EVEN Donald Trump isn't crass enough to say the name out loud. But as he campaigns for the GOP nomination for president, Trump continues to pitch an immigration enforcement plan modeled after a 1950s deportation program dubbed "Operation Wetback. " The term is a derogatory reference to Mexicans crossing the Rio Grande. Under the program launched by President Eisenhower, more than 1.3 million immigrants rounded up in the United States were loaded onto trains, buses and planes and deposited deep in Mexico's interior to prevent them from slipping back across the border.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
SOUTH CAROLINA Muslim woman ejected from Trump rally An advocacy group is seeking an apology from Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign after a Muslim woman standing in silent protest was heckled and then escorted out of an event on Friday. The Council on American-Islamic Relations issued the call for an apology hours after Rose Hamid was thrown out of the Trump rally at Winthrop University in Rock Hill. Hamid said she was standing up in protest of a Trump statement when members of the audience pointed her out by chanting "Trump, Trump, Trump.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
SPARTANBURG, S.C. - Donald Trump backed away Friday, amid a firestorm of criticism from Republican and Democratic opponents in the presidential race and civil-liberties advocates, from discussion of requiring Muslims in the United States to register in a national database. Trump did not mention the issue during a lengthy town hall session with a moderator at Wofford College here, and his staff physically blocked reporters from approaching him with questions. He later distanced himself on Twitter from the controversial comments.
NEWS
October 21, 2015
BEFORE Karla Marquez came to America, she had no idea how bad things were in Mexico. This was 2006, she was 18 and scored an internship for international students at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. When she arrived, she thought she knew how to speak English, "but I really didn't," she discovered, so she took classes and learned. Her job was in hotel food and beverage, and that's where she met Penn State student Michael Eisenhart, but I am getting ahead of the story. "When I came to the U.S.," she says, "I realized that I was happy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|