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Mexico City

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NEWS
March 21, 2012 | McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
MEXICO CITY - A powerful earthquake in southern Mexico yesterday shook buildings in this megacity, sending objects tumbling from shelves, cracking walls and emptying buildings of millions of frightened residents fleeing to the streets. But there were no reports of fatalities, and only seven people were injured nationwide in what officials said was the strongest quake to hit Mexico City since a 1985 temblor killed as many as 10,000 people. The quake hit at 12:02 p.m. local time and lasted for more than a minute.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By Carol Morello and Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writers
There are so many people here that parts of town are sinking under them. By the Bellas Artes museum, a magnificent, turn-of-the-century palace of culture, the sidewalks take a surprising slope. The granite building has sunk about 4 1/2 feet into the ground. The problem is far below, where the water table is falling. The 18 million people of Mexico City use a lot of water, far more than nature puts back into this high mountain valley. As water is sucked up - through 1,500 legal and an untold number of illegal wells - the soft subsoil shifts and subsides, altering the landscape and giving cab drivers something curious to point to as they shuttle tourists to the museum to see the Diego Rivera murals.
SPORTS
October 8, 2012 | Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Brian Roberts scored 17 points to help the New Orleans Hornets beat the Orlando Magic, 85-80, in a preseason game Sunday. E'Twaun Moore led the Magic with 16 points and seven assists before a crowd of 18,133 at Mexico City Arena. Mexican-born Gustavo Ayon added 12 points and six rebounds for Orlando.   Hawks 92, Heat 79 ATLANTA - Josh Smith scored 21 points, Lou Williams added 18 and Atlanta beat Miami in a preseason game. Chris Bosh finished with 22 points, and LeBron James had 10 for the defending NBA champion Heat, who played without Dwyane Wade as the star guard recovers from surgery on his left knee.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Mark Stevenson, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Eleven young people were brazenly kidnapped in broad daylight from an after-hours bar in Mexico City's Zona Rosa, a normally calm district of offices, restaurants, drinking spots, and dance clubs, anguished relatives said Thursday. The apparent mass abduction purportedly happened between 10 a.m. and noon Sunday just off the Paseo de la Reforma, the city's main boulevard, near the Angel of Independence monument and only about 11/2 blocks from the U.S. Embassy. Demanding that authorities find their loved ones, family members marched Thursday morning from the Interior Department building to the Zocalo, the city's main square.
SPORTS
October 15, 2000 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Allen Iverson scored 24 points in 24 minutes and added six rebounds and four assists as the 76ers topped the Washington Wizards, 84-80, in an NBA exhibition game last night at the Palacio de los Deportes. A crowd of 17,824 saw the Sixers raise their preseason record to 2-1. Tyrone Hill was the only Sixer other than Iverson to score in double figures. He had 10 points. Theo Ratliff chipped in defensively with four blocked shots. Guard Speedy Claxton, the Sixers' top draft pick, scored one point and fouled out in 21 minutes.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Katherine Corcoran, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - A strong 7.4-magnitude earthquake hit southern Mexico on Tuesday, damaging about 800 homes near the epicenter and swaying tall buildings and spreading fear and panic hundreds of miles away in the capital of Mexico City. One of the strongest to shake Mexico since the deadly 1985 temblor that killed thousands in Mexico City, Tuesday's earthquake hit hardest in the border area of southern Oaxaca and Guerrero states, where Guerrero official confirmed that 800 homes had been damaged, and 60 more collapsed.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Michael Weissenstein, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - After two hours' grueling drive southeast from the center of Mexico City, through paralyzing traffic jams and clouds of throat-burning smog, the bleached-white haze of air pollution gives way to pale-blue sky. In a flat-bottomed boat tied to a willow tree, Crispin Matteos Galicia hauls up sediment in a plastic bucket to fertilize squash seedlings for his chinampa, an island farm built in the shallow waters flowing from the Lake of...
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By Mark Stevenson, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's capital is ready to stomp out its familiar Volkswagen "Bug" taxis. Officials announced Friday the cab licenses of the last of the old-style VW Beetles would expire by Dec. 31, marking the end of an adventurous if uncomfortable part of Mexico City life. The rounded, two-door sedan nicknamed the Bug - in Mexico, it's a Vocho - has long been an informal symbol of this sprawling city, a tough, rattling reflection of its gritty urbanity and chaotic streets.
NEWS
December 3, 1988
This is for the folks who in the course of this brisk, pleasant autumn might have forgotten the message Mother Nature was sending last summer. You know, the Summer the Earth Talked Back. The dirty air, the nauseating smog. The summer that turned even George Bush into something he'd kept quiet about during eight years as vice president: An environmentalist. It is a little synopsis of a couple of recent newspaper articles - one about Los Angeles, the other about Mexico City. Philadelphia is not quite in the league of those two foul-air heavyweights, but their plight argues against complacency.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The last decade of the 20th century was rough on Mexico City. Everything that was already spinning out of control got worse: political corruption, the economy, social inequity, poverty, violence. But, as often happens in periods of crisis, art thrived on the bad news. Artists who might otherwise have been drawn to traditional modes of art-making turned to installation, performance, actions, video, and other more socially engaged art practices that could exert a physical intervention with, or offer a sharp rebuke to, the status quo. "Strange Currencies: Art & Action in Mexico City, 1990-2000," at the Galleries at Moore College of Art & Design, is the first exhibition to thoroughly examine that change in Mexico City's cultural landscape through the works of artists who lived and worked there in the 1990s.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
When it comes to being a tool, Kevin Reeve wants his students to be Swiss Army knives, not just hammers. Hammers, Reeve says, view their problems as nails, and the three men attending his "Urban Escape and Evasion" class out by Philadelphia International Airport learned quickly Thursday morning that it takes diverse skills to survive the end-times he whipped up on a PowerPoint presentation. Being a nail is worse than being a hammer, though, and that's why Reeve, 59, was carrying more blades than a butcher.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | Claire Sasko and David R. Stampone, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every fall, in the shadow of Halloween, another world unfolds, with traditions originating in Mexico. It's the Day of the Dead, or Día de los Muertos. Across the country and in Philadelphia, it's a time for live music, costumes, brightly painted sugar skulls, well-dressed skeletons, and elaborate altars covered with flickering candles, marigolds, and delicious food. Day of the Dead celebrations and Halloween both take place about the same time of year, but whereas Halloween has a definite pop/commercial feeling to it, the Day of the Dead concerns culture and traditions, some of them very old. All through the holidays, roots sink deep in Mexican culture, and because of Philadelphia's expanding Latino population, Day of the Dead celebrations are likely to become more and more common.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The last decade of the 20th century was rough on Mexico City. Everything that was already spinning out of control got worse: political corruption, the economy, social inequity, poverty, violence. But, as often happens in periods of crisis, art thrived on the bad news. Artists who might otherwise have been drawn to traditional modes of art-making turned to installation, performance, actions, video, and other more socially engaged art practices that could exert a physical intervention with, or offer a sharp rebuke to, the status quo. "Strange Currencies: Art & Action in Mexico City, 1990-2000," at the Galleries at Moore College of Art & Design, is the first exhibition to thoroughly examine that change in Mexico City's cultural landscape through the works of artists who lived and worked there in the 1990s.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia - cradle of American democracy, the first city in the colonies to grant religious liberty, and for three centuries a welcoming port city to immigrants from around the world - will this week host what promises to be the largest gathering in its history: a two-day visit by Pope Francis to cap the Catholic Church's eighth international World Meeting of Families. With 750,000 people predicted to see Francis next Saturday, and more than a million on Sunday, this special 24-page section is a guide to the World Meeting and Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is likely to become the first U.S. city designated a World Heritage City, an elite title given to about 250 municipalities worldwide, officials in Mayor Nutter's administration said Thursday. A Philadelphia delegation, including Nutter, advocated for the city's bid while on a trip to Puebla, Mexico, this week. The designation from the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC), which Philadelphia has been seeking for several years, has the potential to enhance the city's status on the world stage and boost the city as an international tourism site and business hub. Fernando Trevino, deputy director of the Mayor's Office of Immigrant and Multicultural Affairs, said city officials believe the organization will approve Philadelphia's application at its November meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
There's no shortage of Latino music in Philadelphia. From the Kimmel to the Painted Bride, the sounds of Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Cuba - traditional or jazz, plus electronic, rap/hip-hop, and pop/rock variations - ring out. So where is the music of Mexico? According to the 2010 U.S. census, Philadelphia's Mexican population increased from 6,220 to 15,531 during the previous decade, with a majority of immigrants moving into South Philly's Italian Market area. "Mexican business owners helped revitalize the Market," says Emilio Mignucci, co-owner of 75-year-old DiBruno Bros.
NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a 22-year-old woman was brutally beaten and raped just steps from Philadelphia Police Headquarters in 2010, detectives learned the name of her alleged attacker within days. Startled by police sirens, the man fled the scene of the rape on the 200 block of North Eighth Street in only his underwear and a shirt - leaving behind enough evidence for police to quickly identify him as Alberto Issac Navarrete Suarez, lately of South Philadelphia. But by then, police say, Suarez was already on the run. The 37-year-old fled to West Virginia and then Texas, where he managed to elude law enforcement and escape to Mexico.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE SO-CALLED Pantless Rapist - a fugitive wanted in two 2010 rapes, including one just across the street from Philadelphia police headquarters - has been returned to Philly to face criminal charges, the FBI and Philadelphia police said yesterday. Alberto Issac Navarrete Suarez, 37, was wanted for allegedly raping, beating and choking a 22-year-old woman Aug. 29, 2010, as she waited at a bus stop outside police headquarters at 8th and Race streets. He also was wanted in the alleged March 21, 2010, kidnapping, rape and robbery of a teenage girl in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
Listening to the president's words Thursday night, Belinda Holguin of South Philadelphia began to cry, knowing firsthand the life-changing impact his historic action could have on millions of families. Her parents were undocumented workers from Mexico when they were granted legal status under the amnesty act of 1986 - a change, she said, that allowed them to find better jobs, send their three children to better schools, and buy a home. "It really pushed us into the middle class," said Holguin, one of about three dozen people who crammed into Taquitos de Puebla in South Philadelphia for a viewing party during the speech.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEXICO CITY - Eduardo Penaloza agrees with Gov. Christie's vision, expressed during a trade mission to Mexico last week, of a stronger relationship between the United States and its largest Latin American trading partner. What Penaloza - a former Mexican consulate official who heads a group promoting Mexican business initiatives in East Harlem - isn't sure of is Christie's stance on some of "the thorny politics" surrounding issues important to Hispanics, he said. Among them: immigration and driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants in New Jersey.
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