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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1987 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This news arrived in the morning mail: "Michael Mann, who has brought architecture and design to the attention of millions of Americans each week through the popular television series Miami Vice, will open the American Institute of Architects 1987 National Convention in Orlando, June 19-22. " That seems just about right. Architects are grateful to have become somewhat stylish in recent years, even if that stylishness has more to do with images of buildings than with buildings themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1986 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report was United Press International.)
Geraldo Rivera says he's ready for Miami Vice, but Miami Vice may not be ready for him. The former ABC reporter says he has written a treatment for the show based on his own adventures. "When the attorney general of Colombia was assassinated, they found a hit list and I was the No. 2 name on it for my reportage," he told Us magazine. "I never actually did a story about that, but in a fictional situation you can re-create that and make it high drama. " In his script, Rivera hopes to play a reporter who goes undercover as a junkie to expose the Mafia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (Mary Ann Norbom contributed to this report.)
Miami Vice has issued an all-points-bulletin for star Don Johnson. NBC Entertainment honcho Brandon Tartikoff yesterday confirmed that the stubbly faced actor, who plays cooler-than-cool Detective Sonny Crockett, has been missing from the Vice set since Monday, when the show began production for its third season. Reason? Greenbacks, of course. According to Tartikoff, Universal Television, which supplies the hit series to the peacock, has an offer on the table to Johnson, who reportedly makes a cool $30,000 per episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1986 | By LEWIS BEALE, Los Angeles Daily News
If pastel colors and high-tech designs didn't exist, Michael Mann would have invented them. Take "Miami Vice. " Take Mann's new film, "Manhunter. " Take, if you will, the office of the creator-producer-director of these projects, Michael Mann himself: light gray wall-to-wall carpeting; black walls; black leather lounge chair and black stoneware lamp; kidney-shape desk in turquoise and red Memphis-Milano design style. And here's the short, kinetic, streetwise and intelligent Mann, dressed in a blousy, blue-and-black-pattern shirt; dark, stylishly full pants and aqua moccasins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Band of the Hand, brought to you without commercial interruption by the makers of Miami Vice, is Mod Squad for the disco generation. Whisked from the reformatory, five Miami juvenile incorrigibles are plunked into the Everglades and learn how to survive in the real jungle. Foraging for termite eggs and raw fish, they learn self-reliance and self-esteem from a Miccosukee Indian named Joe Tiger (Stephen Lang), the social worker who has devised their unique rehabilitation. (Youth wants to know: Who devised these guys' unique hair styles?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
I was all set to trash Colin Bucksey, the director of "Dealers," for ripping off "Miami Vice," when I discovered he'd actually directed several episodes of the TV show. That means he's not guilty of plagiarizing bad material, merely perpetuating it. Bucksey has taken that dead horse of a series and given it a savage beating. Only the setting has changed - instead of disturbingly fashion- conscious Florida cops, the story concerns bond traders in a London bank. Vice fans know what's coming.
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Television's future dawned without warning on Sept. 16, 1984. On that Sunday night, NBC's impossibly stylish Miami Vice debuted, rocketing the medium from drab to fab. TV had always been a cheesy, fast-food form of entertainment. Other shows bowing that same season included Three's a Crowd, Charles in Charge and Finder of Lost Loves. But with its sleek and vibrant look and its sexy and dangerous mood, Vice immediately established itself as that contradiction in terms: hip TV. It was like that moment in The Wizard of Oz when everything goes from black-and-white to color.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | By Glenn Paskin, New York Daily News
Don Johnson once lamented that blond bangs and pretty-boy looks didn't cut the mustard during the 15 years he struggled in B-movies and five failed television pilots. "There wasn't a lot of character in my face back then, and I took whatever I could get," says the man who wrecked a half dozen cars in the 1970s, humbling years filled with sexual escapades, alcohol, marijuana and cocaine. "But that stuff about drowning my failure in drugs is bull," declares the "Miami Vice" smoothie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1987 | By GUY MacMILLIN, Special to the Daily News
A pamphlet from Donald E. Wildmon, executive director of the National Federation for Decency, located in Tupelo, Miss., informs me that "Miami Vice" is TV's "top sex, violence, profanity oriented program. " The pamphlet says each hour of "Miami Vice" last fall contained 22.08 incidents of the stuff. By way of contrast, "The Cosby Show" had only 8.517 per hour. That makes sense. I mean, "Miami Vice" is about a police vice squad. "The Cosby Show" is about a nice family. It's only natural that the show about the vice squad would have more sex and violence in it. I can't make a case for profanity, but I don't understand why some folks worry so much about the quantity of sex and violence on TV. It seems to me the quality of the presentation should be more important.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1986 | By MARILYN BECK, Special to the Daily News
"Miami Vice" production got under way this week - without Don Johnson. The actor and Universal Studios, which produces the hit NBC series, are warring over money. "His representatives have been trying to renegotiate his contract, but we are taking the position that he has a contract and we expect him to honor it," said a Universal executive. Johnson - considered a key ingredient to the success of the show on which he's found fame as the "post-modern macho" Sonny Crockett - was paid $29,000 an episode during his rookie season, and later received a pay boost of several thousand dollars a week.
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SPORTS
August 24, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
This latest installment of Miami vice - the unfolding football scandal at the University of Miami - isn't the fault of boosters, no matter how many are small-minded jock sniffers. It isn't the fault of the college athletes - paid or unpaid - no matter how many are spoiled and short-sighted. And it isn't the fault of greedy coaches, compromised ADs, head-in-the-sand presidents or demanding corporate sponsors. The problem with college athletics is college athletics. The system is inherently corrupt.
SPORTS
August 23, 2011 | By Michelle Kaufman, Miami Herald
MIAMI - When Nevin Shapiro pledged $150,000 to the University of Miami athletic department, he got a student-athlete lounge named after him. But the bigger perk was access - to the football players he idolized, the stadium sideline, the coaches, even the team plane. Big-time college sports rely on boosters to bankroll escalating coaches' salaries and ever-expanding facilities, and those donors sometimes think of themselves as part owners of the team. The more they pay, the closer they get. Anybody who donates $30,000 or more annually becomes a member of the University Club and is promised interaction with a student-athlete, two pregame football sideline passes, travel for two on the team charter to a road game, scoreboard recognition at Sun Life Stadium, four VIP hospitality passes, and a diamond lapel pin, among other things.
SPORTS
February 1, 2010
HOW STUPID IS Bryant McKinnie? By now, everyone knows the Vikings offensive tackle didn't play in last night's Pro Bowl because the league threw him off the NFC team for three unexcused absences at practices. McKinnie, depending on who you listen to, said he didn't practice because he had the flu, or because he was too sore. It was soon discovered, however, the former Woodbury (N.J.) High star is a nit-twit. He couldn't practice during the day, but - according to his Twitter account (bigmacvikings)
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Television's future dawned without warning on Sept. 16, 1984. On that Sunday night, NBC's impossibly stylish Miami Vice debuted, rocketing the medium from drab to fab. TV had always been a cheesy, fast-food form of entertainment. Other shows bowing that same season included Three's a Crowd, Charles in Charge and Finder of Lost Loves. But with its sleek and vibrant look and its sexy and dangerous mood, Vice immediately established itself as that contradiction in terms: hip TV. It was like that moment in The Wizard of Oz when everything goes from black-and-white to color.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TV CRITIC
The pilot episode of Miami Vice runs more than six visually stimulating minutes - with some pretty impressive music, including the Rolling Stones - before anybody utters a significant word. It soon becomes obvious why. The acting's bad, and the dialogue is worse. Looking back, via the just-released Season One (1984-85) DVDs, it's easy to see that the groundbreaking, pastel-colored cop show was a template for the '80s, heavy on style without much substance. The first episode or two should provide eager buyers with a potent demonstration of the power of selective memory and nostalgia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1991 | By Bill Kent, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two years ago, Maryellen Hooper was profiled as a struggling Philadelphia comedian on her way up, in an article that showed her bombing during a comedy competition to dramatize how tough entry-level show business can be. What's happened to Hooper since then? She's left town. "The article didn't exactly paint a picture of, 'Wow, this girl is doing wonderfully,' " Hooper says. "But it added a lot of legitimacy to what I do. The article was a neat thing to send to all my relatives.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Johnson, skipper of a shrimp trawler? Don Johnson, hunkered over a cup o' joe at the corner diner in a two-horse South Carolina town? Don Johnson, crying? This is Paradise, the bucolic Southern weeper about an emotionally crippled couple whose lives are put back on track by the summer-long visit of a little boy. This is what's also called a career about-face: D.J., as friends and hotel doormen call him, dropping the tough-guy act, the cowboy act, the cop act, to, like, act. "At first, I thought Don Johnson?"
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miami is a melting pot that sometimes boils over, an elegant resort and a seedy slum, a lazy place that is one of the world's bustling commercial centers. It is New York and Havana and Kingston and Caracas in the same place. If you go looking, you can find anything and anybody in Miami. Statistics show Miami to be a dangerous place, and it probably is if you're in the drug trade, which, after tourism, is generally thought to be one of the metropolitan region's biggest businesses.
SPORTS
January 2, 1991 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
All week long, as they prepared for the Mobil Cotton Bowl Classic, the No. 4-ranked Miami Hurricanes tried to play down their rap sheet. They spoke softly. They used forks and spoons when they ate. They stayed off the police blotter. Miami Vice had become Miami Nice. That act lasted until a few minutes before kickoff against No. 3 Texas. As the Longhorns ran onto the field, the Miami players began screaming. They pointed. They taunted. They heckled. And they kept it up all afternoon on the way to a smashmouth, trashmouth, 46-3 win, the most lopsided decision in Cotton Bowl history.
SPORTS
November 9, 1989 | By Dick Weiss, Daily News Sports Writer
Take that, Miami. Every once in a while, a slap in the face can help a young team remember what it is. And the Sixers were more than willing to impart that lesson last night. The Miami Heat, a team in just its second year of existence, came to town still giddy over their first victory of the season, an unexpected road win Tuesday night against New Jersey. There was no such giddiness, however, after last night's 115-91 Sixers victory, a game that was virtually decided when Miami fell behind by 17 points after one quarter.
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