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Michael Brecker

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Something unexpected and wonderful has happened to Michael Brecker in the years since his 1990 effort Don't Try This at Home: The saxophonist, previously known for his dazzling, machine-gun technique, has learned how to have fun. The Cheltenham native, whose Tales From the Hudson (Impulse) is nominated for two Grammys, has lost none of his formidable command of the instrument. But his priorities have changed. He's less concerned with perfection, and more willing to toy with the music.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Michael Brecker, 57, the Grammy-winning saxophonist from Cheltenham who was one of the most highly regarded jazz players of his time and an in-demand session man who contributed to recordings by Bruce Springsteen and Parliament-Funkadelic, died yesterday in New York. In May 2005, Mr. Brecker learned he had myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood and bone-marrow disease formerly known as pre-leukemia. A worldwide search for a near-exact match needed for a bone-marrow transplant failed, and last May he received an experimental half-matching transplant from his daughter, Jessica.
NEWS
October 13, 2011
A story Monday on how the late saxophonist Michael Brecker helped get more people registered as bone marrow donors misstated the site where the story's author's donor was tested. It was Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel in Elkins Park.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | Daily News staff writer Mark de la Vina contributed to this report
If you want to keep track of how well Philly does in the Grammy Awards tonight, here's a rundown of our town's nominees, and ones we can claim a piece of: Record of the year: "I'll Make Love to You," Boyz II Men; "Streets of Philadelphia," Bruce Springsteen. Rhythm & blues duo or group: "I'll Make Love to You," Boyz II Men. Rhythm & blues album: "II," Boyz II Men. Song of the year: "Streets of Philadelphia," Springsteen. Male rock vocal: "Streets of Philadelphia," Springsteen; "Philadelphia," Neil Young.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1987 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Tonight and tomorrow, there's something unusual going on at the Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine St. "Blues Function/Melting Point" is described as an "installation performance ritual" involving alto saxophonist Bobby Zankel and his Blues Function Excitation Ensemble, Joan Huckstep and the Excitation Dancers, and painter and sculptor James Dupree. It's impossible to say what this mixed-media collaboration will be like overall, but the music should be combustible, given Zankel's participation - he's one of the city's brightest young soloists and composers.
NEWS
February 21, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The jazz world came together at Town Hall last night to remember saxophone player Michael Brecker. And it came to play. Brecker, the 13-time Grammy winner from Cheltenham who is widely regarded as the most influential sax man of the last 35 years, died from leukemia at age 57 in January. Last night, a lineup of luminaries including Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny and Paul Simon went onstage just a stone's throw from the bright lights of Times Square to pay tribute to a musician who played on more than 900 albums.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
If you have to hit the road for a year, you "can't do better" than travel with Paul Simon and his "Born at the Right Time" world rhythms troupe. So says his featured saxophone and EWI (electronic wind instrument) player Michael Brecker. "The touring is comfortable and the musicians are wonderful. I'm absorbing things everyday which I hope to apply to my own music. " The Cheltenham-born connection to Simon's 18-piece Afro/Brazilian/U.S. orchestra hitting the Spectrum tonight, Michael Brecker checked in recently from Chicago's Meridian Hotel.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Philly/Cheltenham homeboy Michael Brecker is one bad cat on tenor. McCoy Tyner knew this when he featured Brecker on his 1995 "Infinity" (Impulse!). But everybody hasn't caught on - especially since Brecker had a reputation as more of a good studio sideman than an out-and-out player. Plus, his '70s foray into fusion with brother Randy as the Brecker Brothers created preconceived notions. Now comes "Two Blocks from the Edge," which clearly establishes Brecker as a tenor with tons of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norman Connors is certainly best known as a musician, a pioneer in the development of fusion jazz in the early 1970s, a noted composer and a respected producer. But he also could be called a rather good talent scout. He is always seeking out fresh talent in his home town, Philadelphia, and other areas where he performs. Consider, for instance, a few of the singers who came to prominence laying down tracks for numbers on Connors' albums over the years: Phyllis Hyman, Jean Carn, Michael Henderson and Glenn Jones.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Ronni Gordon, For The Inquirer
The theme from Rocky blared as I stretched with scores of others preparing for this year's Broad Street Run. It evoked thoughts of another fighter, Philly-born jazz tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker, whose battle with leukemia had much to do with why I could survive the same disease and travel from western Massachusetts to join 30,000 runners this spring. Brecker - an elite jazz improviser and New York studio musician - died four years ago after he failed to find a match for a bone marrow transplant.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2011
A story Monday on how the late saxophonist Michael Brecker helped get more people registered as bone marrow donors misstated the site where the story's author's donor was tested. It was Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel in Elkins Park.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Ronni Gordon, For The Inquirer
The theme from Rocky blared as I stretched with scores of others preparing for this year's Broad Street Run. It evoked thoughts of another fighter, Philly-born jazz tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker, whose battle with leukemia had much to do with why I could survive the same disease and travel from western Massachusetts to join 30,000 runners this spring. Brecker - an elite jazz improviser and New York studio musician - died four years ago after he failed to find a match for a bone marrow transplant.
NEWS
May 29, 2007 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Brecker, one of the greatest tenor saxophonists of our time and of all time, left this existence on Jan. 13 at the age of 57. But those who knew him and played with him believe that his musical and personal legacy will live on with the posthumous album Pilgrimage (Heads Up Records), which was released last week. "It is a testament to the awesome drive Michael had for his life, and his incredible will to live," Brecker's widow, Susan, said by telephone from her family home in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., about an hour's drive north of Manhattan.
NEWS
February 21, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The jazz world came together at Town Hall last night to remember saxophone player Michael Brecker. And it came to play. Brecker, the 13-time Grammy winner from Cheltenham who is widely regarded as the most influential sax man of the last 35 years, died from leukemia at age 57 in January. Last night, a lineup of luminaries including Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny and Paul Simon went onstage just a stone's throw from the bright lights of Times Square to pay tribute to a musician who played on more than 900 albums.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Michael Brecker, 57, the Grammy-winning saxophonist from Cheltenham who was one of the most highly regarded jazz players of his time and an in-demand session man who contributed to recordings by Bruce Springsteen and Parliament-Funkadelic, died yesterday in New York. In May 2005, Mr. Brecker learned he had myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood and bone-marrow disease formerly known as pre-leukemia. A worldwide search for a near-exact match needed for a bone-marrow transplant failed, and last May he received an experimental half-matching transplant from his daughter, Jessica.
NEWS
August 23, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The genes that bestowed a rare musical gift are now interrupting an important artistic life. Michael Brecker, the Cheltenham-born tenor saxophonist considered to be one of the most innovative and influential in the world, is suffering from a potentially deadly bone-marrow disease. An urgent search is on to find the close genetic match he needs for treatment. "We are all in a kind of shock," said Jaleel Shaw, an alto saxophonist who teaches jazz at Temple University. "I get lots of e-mails from different musicians about it. It's devastating.
NEWS
August 2, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saxophonist Michael Brecker is gravely ill. The Philadelphia-born, Cheltenham-raised jazzman - who has won 11 Grammy Awards, more than any other sax player - has been diagnosed with MDS (myelodysplastic syndrome), a blood and bone marrow disease, according to an announcement on his Web site. Brecker, 56, is being treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and needs a stem-cell transplant. In a career as a sideman and a leader, the tenor player - whose most recent album is Wide Angles (2003)
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Philly/Cheltenham homeboy Michael Brecker is one bad cat on tenor. McCoy Tyner knew this when he featured Brecker on his 1995 "Infinity" (Impulse!). But everybody hasn't caught on - especially since Brecker had a reputation as more of a good studio sideman than an out-and-out player. Plus, his '70s foray into fusion with brother Randy as the Brecker Brothers created preconceived notions. Now comes "Two Blocks from the Edge," which clearly establishes Brecker as a tenor with tons of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Something unexpected and wonderful has happened to Michael Brecker in the years since his 1990 effort Don't Try This at Home: The saxophonist, previously known for his dazzling, machine-gun technique, has learned how to have fun. The Cheltenham native, whose Tales From the Hudson (Impulse) is nominated for two Grammys, has lost none of his formidable command of the instrument. But his priorities have changed. He's less concerned with perfection, and more willing to toy with the music.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | Daily News staff writer Mark de la Vina contributed to this report
If you want to keep track of how well Philly does in the Grammy Awards tonight, here's a rundown of our town's nominees, and ones we can claim a piece of: Record of the year: "I'll Make Love to You," Boyz II Men; "Streets of Philadelphia," Bruce Springsteen. Rhythm & blues duo or group: "I'll Make Love to You," Boyz II Men. Rhythm & blues album: "II," Boyz II Men. Song of the year: "Streets of Philadelphia," Springsteen. Male rock vocal: "Streets of Philadelphia," Springsteen; "Philadelphia," Neil Young.
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