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Michael Diberardinis

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NEWS
November 13, 2012
In an article Monday about the writer Matthew Quick and the screen adaptation of his novel The Silver Linings Playbook , the occupation of Bradley Cooper's character was incorrectly described. He is a history teacher. A book review Saturday gave an incorrect date for Ulysses S. Grant's departure from the presidency. It was March 5, 1877. An item in Sunday's "Heard in the Hall" column incorrectly described how the City's Parks and Recreation Commissioner, Michael DiBerardinis, cast his ballot last week.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
CITY COUNCIL took a rare break Thursday from its summer recess to address violent crime in the city's parks and recreation centers after several recent shootings and the rape of a 12-year-old girl occurred in public spaces. "Parks have become abandoned by people who are afraid to use them," said Councilwoman Cindy Bass, who is chairwoman of the Committee on Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs and who called for the committee hearing. Michael Resnick, the city's public-safety director, said the city is battling an uptick in overall violence and a 4 percent increase in violent crime in and around parks and rec centers compared with the first eight months of last year.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
For groups defying Mayor Nutter's sensible ban on open-air feedings of the homeless along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, it may well be a social or religious calling to help desperate men and women gathered at one of the city's marquee public spaces.   But it's hard to see how such a mission legally can trump the city's health and safety regulations. Nor are random feedings an improvement over the mayor's sound goal of moving these actitivities indoors, where the homeless can be linked with services to get them back on their feet.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
A vast repast will unfold on Independence Mall Oct. 5, a product of the Mural Arts Program's effort to rethink its mission, program director Jane Golden said Thursday. Part of a months-long effort called "What We Sow," the event - "70x7 The Meal, act XXXIV" - is a collaboration between Mural Arts and the Paris-based artists Lucy and Jorge Orta. It involves a free communal meal created by star chef Marc Vetri involving heirloom vegetables. Golden said nearly a thousand people will dine at a table decorated by the Ortas' tableware and runners.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WANT to spruce up your yard this spring? The city can hook you up with one or two free trees - but you have to act fast. The deadline to register for TreePhilly's spring campaign is March 31. Go to treephilly.org. Residents can choose from nine times and locations to pick up trees in April. They also can get information on the 10 species that the city is offering. There's the pawpaw, which grows to about 20-feet tall and sprouts "fruits that taste like banana custard"; the sweetbay magnolia, with "large fragrant white flowers" in the spring and "bright red berries" in the fall; the enormous tulip tree, which can grow to 90 feet; and many others, according to the city's website.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Alia Conley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the Beach Boys summer song "Surfin' USA" boomed in the background, about 20 children joined Mayor Nutter Wednesday for the first ceremonial splash into Mander Recreation Center pool on Wednesday. "School's out! In the pool!" Nutter said, inviting the "young and young at heart" to enjoy the city's pools on hot days. The Mander pool in Strawberry Mansion opened along with 12 other city pools. All 70 city pools will open by mid-July and remain open through Aug. 12. Local fund-raising and company donations - part of Nutter's Splash and Summer Fund campaign - raised the $600,000 needed to open the pools.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A traveling carnival operation that was supposed to open Thursday to raise money for NAACP scholarships is still looking for a venue, after losing a bid to set up on city land in Hunting Park. "We don't allow carnivals," said Michael DiBerardinis, the deputy mayor in charge of parks and recreation. "Historically they've presented problems to us – there was a homicide attached to one at Russo Playground in the early 2000s. . ..No matter how well they're run, there's a lot of wear and tear and usually damage to the facilities, with all this heavy equipment and the crowds..
NEWS
June 10, 2011
IN THE PAST two days, we have reported on how, years of neglect of Philadelphia's parks have been reversed over the past decade. Which brings us to what looks like a template for a future in which green space is a treasure available to every Philadelphian. Ten years ago, when this newspaper investigated the parks for an series called "Acres of Neglect," we couldn't imagine a future that looked much different. The people running the parks did not seem interested in doing things differently.
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NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
A vast repast will unfold on Independence Mall Oct. 5, a product of the Mural Arts Program's effort to rethink its mission, program director Jane Golden said Thursday. Part of a months-long effort called "What We Sow," the event - "70x7 The Meal, act XXXIV" - is a collaboration between Mural Arts and the Paris-based artists Lucy and Jorge Orta. It involves a free communal meal created by star chef Marc Vetri involving heirloom vegetables. Golden said nearly a thousand people will dine at a table decorated by the Ortas' tableware and runners.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has worked well in other city parks, and some environmentalists say the benefits are likely to outweigh the costs. Nevertheless, the idea of a network of zip lines, ropes, and cables allowing visitors to explore the Fairmount Park treetops has fired up opponents, who are organizing to stop the city from considering it. Worried that it will damage vegetation, disrupt wildlife, and spoil the tranquillity of an urban oasis, residents formed the...
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
A traveling carnival operation that was supposed to open Thursday to raise money for NAACP scholarships is still looking for a venue, after losing a bid to set up on city land in Hunting Park. "We don't allow carnivals," said Michael DiBerardinis, the deputy mayor in charge of parks and recreation. "Historically they've presented problems to us - there was a homicide attached to one at Russo Playground in the early 2000s . . .. No matter how well they're run, there's a lot of wear and tear and usually damage to the facilities, with all this heavy equipment and the crowds.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WANT to spruce up your yard this spring? The city can hook you up with one or two free trees - but you have to act fast. The deadline to register for TreePhilly's spring campaign is March 31. Go to treephilly.org. Residents can choose from nine times and locations to pick up trees in April. They also can get information on the 10 species that the city is offering. There's the pawpaw, which grows to about 20-feet tall and sprouts "fruits that taste like banana custard"; the sweetbay magnolia, with "large fragrant white flowers" in the spring and "bright red berries" in the fall; the enormous tulip tree, which can grow to 90 feet; and many others, according to the city's website.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
The planning and construction of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and its first major cultural institutions spanned about three decades. So it's not surprising that updating Philadelphia's version of the Champs-Élysées is taking more than a few years. By the time the Parkway reaches its centenary in several years, however, the mile-long boulevard's worst flaws could be much more tolerable, thanks to the latest in a series of city improvement initiatives. The challenge, as it has been for decades, is to tame the Parkway's multiple lanes of often high-speed traffic, which pose dire risks to pedestrians and bicyclists alike.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By SANDRA SHEA
ON A HOT June day nine years ago, I met up with an architect and an historian at LOVE Park and we spent the next few hours slowly making our way up Ben Franklin Parkway on foot. By the time we got to the Art Museum I had not only a sunburn, but also a new appreciation for just how much work this grand boulevard needed. While imposing institutions lined both sides, the spaces in between were, for the most part, unplanned and inhospitable. With no places for people to convene, expanses of dead space, no food offerings but a Subway sandwich shop, and constant car traffic that made crossing the street an obstacle course, the Ben Franklin Parkway fell far short of greatness.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
In an article Monday about the writer Matthew Quick and the screen adaptation of his novel The Silver Linings Playbook , the occupation of Bradley Cooper's character was incorrectly described. He is a history teacher. A book review Saturday gave an incorrect date for Ulysses S. Grant's departure from the presidency. It was March 5, 1877. An item in Sunday's "Heard in the Hall" column incorrectly described how the City's Parks and Recreation Commissioner, Michael DiBerardinis, cast his ballot last week.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, it's been one of those "only in Philly" kind of conundrums: You couldn't easily get to the Schuylkill from the place known as Schuylkill River Park. Between the bright green oasis at 25th and Spruce Streets and the beckoning waterfront are hard-to-cross CSX railroad tracks. Access denied - until Saturday. A long-anticipated and fought-over pedestrian bridge that connects the park to the riverfront trail known as Schuylkill Banks opened Saturday, on time and under budget.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
LOVE Park needs more love In reference to Friday's editorial "Where did our LOVE go," while more work can always be done, I think we have made progress at John F. Kennedy Plaza, also known as LOVE Park. Some of this progress was mentioned in two earlier articles written by Miriam Hill, namely the dedicated work of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation employee Albert Figlestahler. Operating under budgetary constraints, the Department of Parks and Recreation has devoted maintenance and programming resources to LOVE Park, and the impact is being felt.
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