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Michael Fay

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NEWS
June 20, 1994 | Daily News wire services
SINGAPORE FAY IS SET TO BE RELEASED TUESDAY Michael Fay, the American teen-ager who was convicted of spray-painting cars, is due to be released tomorrow after 81 days in jail during which he was lashed four times with a rattan cane. His punishment led to a diplomatic dispute with Singapore, with President Clinton condemning it several times. Human-rights groups yesterday said they wanted to interview Fay so as to obtain a first-hand account of a punishment they have likened to torture.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
OK, it's time for America to use the old Singapore Sling if that's what it takes to rid our city and nation of violent crime committed by juveniles. The situation in Singapore should awaken citizens here that it's time to get serious in addressing our problem with juvenile offenders. Please don't get me wrong - I am not saying set up the whipping post in City Hall courtyard and administer daytime floggings. But let's look at an effective way to deal with youthful offenders that will deter them from repeating acts that violate society's rules.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
It's not like Bill to pull down his pants. - Gennifer Flowers, who claimed she had an affair with Bill Clinton, on why Paula Jones' accusations "don't sound kosher. " PATTI'S LATEST PLOY: PLAYBOY Former first daughter Patti Davis, whose serpent's tooth has pierced her parents in fiction, in memoirs, on talk shows and in lectures about dysfunctional families, has struck again: The daughter of the "Just Say No" inventors just said yes to a nude pictorial and cover-girl photo for the July issue of Playboy magazine.
SPORTS
September 9, 1988 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometime late this afternoon, Dennis Conner's 60-foot catamaran, Stars & Stripes, is expected to cross the finish line well ahead of the 132-foot sloop New Zealand. Whoop-dee-doo. If that happens, the catamaran will have beaten the monohull in two consecutive races to win the best-of-three series in defense of the America's Cup. Everybody has been embarrassed by this series, which has been marked by legal battles over, among other things, the types of boats involved in the competition.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | BY DONNA BRITT
I have been thinking about setting my dog afire. If you are shocked, you clearly have not met Silverado. Regular readers know that Silver was my nemesis long before the idea of immolation occurred to me Saturday - after he sneezed a muzzle-full of dog snot in my face. Veterinarians say there's one way to decrease his ceaseless yapping, jumping, twirling and whining - an operation similar to that performed by Lorena Bobbitt on her resident hound. I just can't. Actually, John Wayne Bobbitt is responsible for my cruel fantasy.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Michael Fay. At the moment, his name might be unfamiliar, but I doubt if anyone has a greater potential to arouse heated emotions, headstrong opinions and emotional talk-show babble. Before long, it will happen. Fay, 18, is an American who lives in Singapore because that is where his mother and stepfather work for an American company. For those who flunked geography, Singapore is a city-state in the Far East. It has been described as looking like a prosperous California suburb.
NEWS
April 14, 1994
SOME READERS THINK FLOGGING ISN'T SUCH A BAD IDEA As a former prosecutor, I am compelled to write in response to your editorial entitled "Cracking the whip" in the April 10 Inquirer. In arguing against the caning of young Michael Fay in Singapore, you contend that, despite the increase in the U.S. prison population and the number of offenses that are now punishable by death, crime is still on the increase. You appear to conclude that providing tough penalties for committing crimes is not the answer to the problem but, rather, " . . . building a society that wants to live by the rules.
SPORTS
September 10, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Dennis Conner said he only did what he had to do to keep the America's Cup. Conner won sailing's most prestigious trophy for the third time yesterday, breezing to an easy victory to complete a 2-0 whitewash of New Zealand in a best-of-three series that now heads for a New York courtroom. "This wasn't something we wanted to do. We had a job and did it," Conner said after his Stars & Stripes, a 60-foot catamaran, left the huge challenger from New Zealand miles behind, winning by 21 minutes, 10 seconds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
People need to look past the men's missing limbs, Marine Corps artist Michael Fay said, to see the resilience in their faces. Even if those faces are scarred and misshapen. One portrait shows Sgt. David Adams, a young Marine from Wisconsin, using his remaining arm to hold an X-ray of his broken back. Cpl. Zachary Stinson has lost both legs. The face of Lance Cpl. Kyle Carpenter, who was wounded by a hand grenade, looks like cracked porcelain. Those and dozens more paintings and sketches make up the Joe Bonham Project, created by Fay and showing at Drexel University as part of a new course on how war is portrayed in the media.
SPORTS
September 16, 2010 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One can sense the awe in Michael Fay's voice as he talks about Penn State and Beaver Stadium and the hope as he recounts the story of waiting a few years ago for someone on the Nittany Lions' coaching staff to make a recruiting call to him. The call never came, and the 6-foot-4, 294-pound junior from Allentown will line up at left guard for Kent State when it plays the Lions on Saturday. Still, Fay holds no grudge and eagerly awaits the opportunity to step on the green grass before more than 100,000 spectators.
NEWS
June 22, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three-year-old Kyle Lobis' ink-stained hands carried a payoff for his parents and for Boy Scout John Michael Fay. The ink used to fingerprint Kyle meant that his parents would have a record, in case of an emergency. For Fay, it was one more step toward his Eagle Scout badge. "I like the fact it helps anybody who is willing to participate in it," said Fay, 15, of Warrington, in Troop 238. "Anybody that wants it can get it done. " For his Eagle Scout project - "Ident-A-Kid" - Fay made fingerprints and photographs of children for their parents' files.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ohio teenager Michael Fay was sentenced to a caning last May in Singapore, many Americans - preoccupied with crime in their own streets and frustrated by their increasing sense of powerlessness to combat it - applauded. Ten months later, the frustration endures, and has fueled a growing movement at the state and local level to institute beatings for convicted criminals. Proposed punishments range from the paddling of juvenile graffiti writers in California and New York, to the caning of convicts in Mississippi, to the beating of felons on the county courthouse steps in Tennessee.
LIVING
December 29, 1994 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER POPULAR-CULTURE WRITER Inquirer news researchers Marla Otto and Denise Boal contributed to this article
Some years are perfect. Gorgeous, even. Symmetrical, cohesive, thematic. They're tidy masterpieces. And rare. Finally, we have one. You have to live a long time to find a year that resonates as harmoniously as this one. These years play in history as a solid canvas: 1776 was independence, 1865 signified abolition, 1929 delivered disaster. Now, add to that list the one we are about to heave into the dumpster: 1994, the year of trash. Yes, 1994 was a year of wars and some peace.
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | Daily News wire services
SINGAPORE FAY IS SET TO BE RELEASED TUESDAY Michael Fay, the American teen-ager who was convicted of spray-painting cars, is due to be released tomorrow after 81 days in jail during which he was lashed four times with a rattan cane. His punishment led to a diplomatic dispute with Singapore, with President Clinton condemning it several times. Human-rights groups yesterday said they wanted to interview Fay so as to obtain a first-hand account of a punishment they have likened to torture.
NEWS
June 9, 1994
DON'T WASTE YOUR SYMPATHY ON THE LIKES OF MICHAEL FAY Larrell R. Walt and John R. Austin (letters May 24): How can any sane American citizen stand up for that piece of garbage, Michael Fay? Caning "inhumane"? I guess vandalism is not only humane, but the thing to do. "Torture"? Seeing justice served is torture? It is because of the many bleeding hearts in this country that America has gone straight to hell in a bucket! Whatever happened to the days of justice being served?
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | BY DONNA BRITT
I have been thinking about setting my dog afire. If you are shocked, you clearly have not met Silverado. Regular readers know that Silver was my nemesis long before the idea of immolation occurred to me Saturday - after he sneezed a muzzle-full of dog snot in my face. Veterinarians say there's one way to decrease his ceaseless yapping, jumping, twirling and whining - an operation similar to that performed by Lorena Bobbitt on her resident hound. I just can't. Actually, John Wayne Bobbitt is responsible for my cruel fantasy.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
It's not like Bill to pull down his pants. - Gennifer Flowers, who claimed she had an affair with Bill Clinton, on why Paula Jones' accusations "don't sound kosher. " PATTI'S LATEST PLOY: PLAYBOY Former first daughter Patti Davis, whose serpent's tooth has pierced her parents in fiction, in memoirs, on talk shows and in lectures about dysfunctional families, has struck again: The daughter of the "Just Say No" inventors just said yes to a nude pictorial and cover-girl photo for the July issue of Playboy magazine.
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