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Michael Masch

NEWS
October 21, 1996 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
If Ed Rendell is the heart and soul of the administration, chief of staff David Cohen is a good chunk of its brains, and certainly its adrenaline gland. Cohen seems to have the energy to pounce on any crisis and stay with it around the clock, while still guiding the administration's more important management initiatives. He is Rendell's most trusted adviser, and the linchpin of key political relationships - he often speaks with City Council President John Street several times a day. What would Rendell do if Cohen left?
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
School district officials aren't jumping for joy over their share of the increased state-education budget Gov. Rendell signed yesterday, but they're not crying broke, either. "We're not saying that a reduction of $30 to $40 million doesn't hurt, but we do have a budget of $3.2 billion here," said the district's chief business officer Michael Masch. "We're not wasting money. We run pretty lean in many ways. " Still, the district's budget must be readjusted to reflect the multimillion-dollar shortage, he said.
NEWS
February 6, 2002
I AM AT a loss to understand why the Daily News printed the story "Masch has jobs but no degree" (Jan. 30). It deepens my cynicism about the motives of the press. The facts of the story appear to be that the mayor's office made an error in its press release when it reported that Michael Masch has two college degrees. The article reported that Masch has none. Two potential stories are suggested by these facts. First, that Masch lied about his credentials, a practice we have seen repeatedly with tragic consequences for the individuals involved (most recently the Notre Dame football coach who was forced to resign when the misrepresentation was made public)
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | BY DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
IN HIS FIRST BUDGET UPDATE to the School Reform Commission since the spring, the school district's chief business officer, Michael Masch, yesterday revealed more cuts to the district, including drastic cuts to two signature district initiatives. District officials seek to close a $35 million budget gap, and in doing so have undercut Promise Academies, one of Superintendent Arlene Ackerman's key initiatives. Three will open this year instead of the 11 as originally planned, Masch reported.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The $98 million the Philadelphia School District expects to receive under the federal Education Jobs Bill could not have come at a better time, according to the district's chief financial officer. The district expects to get $49 million this school year which will make up for lost revenue in its $3.2 billion budget, Michael Masch told the School Reform Commission Wednesday. For starters, the money helps replace $55 million in state aid the district did not receive, he said.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
The school district's budget problems are far from over after the state Legislature restored a paltry $22 million from the nearly $300 million that Gov. Corbett slashed. Although district and city officials hoped that City Council's vote to raise property taxes by nearly 4 percent might have led to more cash from the state, lawmakers last night approved a budget that leaves the district with at least a $35 million shortfall. "We've got a $35 million hole, and we need to make some other changes to our financial plan in order to close that gap," Michael Masch, the district's chief financial officer, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
I READ Josh Cornfield's article about Philadelphia School District financial officer Michael Masch and found it both off-target and unnecessarily personal. Masch has served the public in budget-related finance roles for many years. He served on the staff of the Philadelphia City Council, as Philadelphia's budget director, and as Gov. Rendell's budget chief in Harrisburg. In these positions he had to gather information, made decisions and set priorities for billions of dollars. He has shown great integrity in these positions and sometimes made tough calls.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Top officials of the Philadelphia School District yesterday tried to defuse City Council's concerns about the district's $3.2 billion budget for the coming fiscal year. Councilman Bill Green questioned whether the district could make do without additional state funding proposed - but not guaranteed - by Gov. Rendell. "You can't really rely on the promise of this revenue when planning a budget," Green said, referring to a proposed $95 million increase in the state's basic-education subsidy for the district.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
After looking at the math behind the School District's red-ink budget, Schools Superintendent David Hornbeck said yesterday he may cut his reform plans. Hornbeck told the Board of Education the first to go would be summer schools, only one year after he resurrected them. The board has yet to authorize summer schools for July, as it struggles with a projected deficit of nearly $205 million in its $1.6 billion operating budget. Hornbeck wants to add summer classes to serve at least 32,000 students expected to fail this June.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell bid farewell yesterday to "the unsung hero of this administration," budget director Michael Masch, whose mastery of numbers has been rewarded with a nearly 50 percent salary increase at the University of Pennsylvania. Masch, 45, has resigned to serve in the new position of executive director of budget and management analysis at Penn, Rendell announced at a news conference in his chambers. Upon Masch's departure in May, Dean Kaplan, the Water Department's deputy commissioner, will replace him. If Philadelphians see the barrel-chested, bearded Masch on the streets in the next several days, Rendell said, "they should give him a big hug. " The mayor credited Masch with initiating minutely detailed financial reports for city managers and advocating innovative ways to cut $750 million from the cost of running the city during the administration's first term.
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