CollectionsMichael Nutter
IN THE NEWS

Michael Nutter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 10, 2004
CITY COUNCIL is scheduled to hold hearings today on the budget and a raft of sweeping tax reform bills. How ready is Council? The Daily News asked all 17 members the following question: 1Have you read the 500-page Tax Reform Commission report, which explains the need for each tax reform bill now before City Council? (The report was released in November.) 2Will you support all or some of the 13 tax reform bills put forth by the Tax Reform Commission? 1Yes. 2No. "I would expect to be for 11 or 12 of the bills.
NEWS
October 31, 2007
WE'VE BEEN joking lately that Michael Nutter's campaign bumper sticker should read "Michael Nutter: Managing Expectations. " Ever since this reform candidate pulled the primary out from under the millionaire, two congressmen and a state rep, many in the city have done something they haven't done for a long time: Dared to dream. They're imagining a City Hall snatched from its legacy of pay-to-play, finally shaking off the reputation of a content and corrupt city and being led by someone who can wrangle the budget, crime and schools - and still talk about sustainability, transparency and ethics.
NEWS
May 19, 2011
THREE QUARTERS of the city's voters reaffirmed a likely second term for Mayor Nutter. The bad news: One quarter voted for a stunt candidate who owes the government more than $1 million in back taxes. Still, Nutter now has a choice: to make it a second term in which he has lots of free time because he can't get anyone to do anything . . . or a second term in which, having nothing left to lose, he lets it rip. We prefer the latter. Here is our advice: The mayor should forgo green and eat more red meat : Nice Mike should acquire a taste for blood.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
At Great Expectations forums this year, the people of Philadelphia spoke about what they seek in the next mayor. Certain themes cropped up again and again. Voters want a mayor who will rise above "politics as usual," who will attack corruption. They want "a mayor of the whole city," someone who won't cater just to his base, who won't pit neighborhoods vs. Center City. They want someone who is not just smart, but displays "emotional intelligence. " Someone who can attract good people to City Hall and keep them; who can make ordinary citizens feel heard, not dismissed.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FLORENCE, BEIJING, Tianjin, London, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Las Vegas, New Orleans, Birmingham, Grand Rapids, Chicago, New York, Washington, D.C. No, that's not the list of stops on Miley Cyrus' Twerk Tour 2013. It's a list of places the mayor of Philadelphia has traveled to - in the past year. Since taking office in 2008, Mayor Nutter's travels outside Pennsylvania have cost Philly taxpayers $243,000, according to records obtained through a Right to Know request. Included in that total are expenses for Nutter's entourage, which usually includes a couple of top administration officials, an assistant and a handful of Philadelphia police officers for security.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Michael Nutter is "looking forward to seeing some films, maybe taking in a lecture or comedian" at a new Arch Street venue that bears his name. What used to be a pleasant but fairly mundane meeting room at the Pennsylvania Convention Center has now been teched-up with fancy projection and sound rigs and recommissioned as the Michael A. Nutter Theatre. Besides better serving the needs of conventioneers, the 600-seat (plus 40-ADA-handicapped-location) venue is open for rental and can "help fill a void in this neighborhood for a medium-sized theater for film festivals, movie premieres and screenings, comedy shows, spoken word performances, musical acts, and auditions," John J. McNichol, Convention Center Authority CEO, said at a dedication ceremony Wednesday night.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
FOUR YEARS AGO, our endorsement of MICHAEL NUTTER ran with a one-word subhead: "DUH!" The choice in the general election was that obvious. Republican Al Taubenberger offered only token resistance, and Nutter had emerged from an impressive field to win the Democratic primary in this one-party town's de facto mayor's race. This year, he is virtually unopposed for the nomination (sorry, Milton), and his overall record has earned him our enthusiastic endorsement. The mayor had barely finished repeating the oath of office before he was forced to wield a budget ax and collect more money.
NEWS
February 28, 2004
Anyone who follows Philadelphia politics knows that the Street administration has put a bull's-eye on its chief critic on City Council, Michael Nutter. An ally of Mayor Street, Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, is now the de facto leader of Council, thanks to a subtle coup against Council President Anna C. Verna. The Street-friendly Council majority that stripped Verna of her normal powers now has kicked Nutter out as chair and vice chair of key committees. Philadelphia politics are hardball; Nutter has opposed the mayor on many high-profile issues.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
YOU HAVE GOT to be kidding! Street vs. Nutter, Nutter vs. Street? Are these the only options? Is this the best Philly has to offer its hardworking, taxpaying citizens? If I vote for the old crazy guy who owes more than $1 million, I make Nutter look bad. If I vote for Nutter, I make myself look bad and disappoint my fellow residents. We should all strike and not vote for anyone. Maybe then someone with better qualities and credentials will come forward, and we can cast our vote for him. It should be somebody who's not so well-known in our area as Milton or Michael.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly after 10 tomorrow morning, Michael Nutter will be sworn in as Philadelphia's 98th mayor and take the helm of a city that is hungry for his leadership and plainly expecting great things from his administration. After the inaugural party winds down, enormous and pressing challenges await Nutter in his second-floor office in City Hall. In less than a month, he must craft a budget and a five-year plan that reflect his priorities. He must finish putting together his government.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
IN APRIL 2015, the board of directors of the Mayor's Fund for Philadelphia turned down a $25,000 grant request to market the city to the World Heritage City selection committee. "The designation of Philadelphia as a World Heritage City is not a high priority from the board's perspective," the minutes of the meeting stated. Two months later, without board approval or apparent knowledge, the Mayor's Fund came up with $10,000 for the effort, a pet project of Michael Nutter's when Nutter was mayor.
NEWS
July 21, 2016
The charges against longtime political insider Melonease Shaw for allegedly stealing money from a welfare program add more slime to the goo attached to the city Democratic Party, which doesn't seem to mind that it has become synonymous with public corruption. For years, Shaw has danced with Philadelphia's political elite to pay for a spectacular lifestyle that included discounted rent for her offices, free catering and parking, and $3,000 in line dance lessons. She also danced more than a few contracts out of public officials.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
AFTER EIGHT YEARS of Michael Nutter, Philadelphia seems to be returning to a strong-mayor form of government. That's the way it is supposed to be. The mayor as the pre-eminent power in City Hall was an idea written into the City Charter more than 60 years ago. Unlike what is in the U.S. Constitution, the legislative branch and the executive branch were not supposed to be co-equal. The mayor was given the tools to rule. Unfortunately, as Nutter discovered, you still need to get City Council to provide the votes for your agenda, and he never mastered that trick.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Michael Nutter is "looking forward to seeing some films, maybe taking in a lecture or comedian" at a new Arch Street venue that bears his name. What used to be a pleasant but fairly mundane meeting room at the Pennsylvania Convention Center has now been teched-up with fancy projection and sound rigs and recommissioned as the Michael A. Nutter Theatre. Besides better serving the needs of conventioneers, the 600-seat (plus 40-ADA-handicapped-location) venue is open for rental and can "help fill a void in this neighborhood for a medium-sized theater for film festivals, movie premieres and screenings, comedy shows, spoken word performances, musical acts, and auditions," John J. McNichol, Convention Center Authority CEO, said at a dedication ceremony Wednesday night.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | BY TRICIA L. NADOLNY, Staff Writer
FORMER MAYOR Michael Nutter is no stranger to cable news networks, but typically he was the focus of the headlines. Now, he's ready to try his hand at weighing in on the day's news - as a commentator for CNN. "It came together pretty quickly," Nutter said Monday afternoon from CNN's Washington offices, where he was preparing to go live to discuss the Iowa caucuses. "And it's definitely an honor. My goal is to try to communicate a message that is direct, authentic, and represents a reality of 20-plus years of elected office.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Now that the "Nutter Era" is officially past tense, and Jim Kenney is managing this obstreperous city, we'll be seeing a lot less of Michael Nutter, the person. Yet the architectural additions and deletions that occurred during his tenure will stay with us for a long time. What were its hallmarks? Sadly, this period yielded very little of the kind of architecture that ends up in the history books. That's partly because Nutter took office as the United States was slipping into the Great Recession and developers' best-laid plans were going awry.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It took some nerve for Michael Nutter to ask his successor as mayor, Jim Kenney, to let a political appointee linger into the new administration - and not just because the aide in question once compared Kenney to Archie Bunker. In the waning weeks of his mayoralty, as The Inquirer's Julia Terruso reported last week, Nutter asked Kenney to allow Desiree Peterkin-Bell to soak up the additional month of her $150,000 annual salary needed to reach five years of city employment and thereby qualify for a pension.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Jim Kenney began his first week as mayor dancing with Philadelphia sports mascots on a stage celebrating his inauguration. He visited classrooms. He dissed misbehaving Mummers and the recently fired Eagles coach. By the waning hours of Day Four, he was rushing to the hospital bed of a wounded police officer and coming face-to-face with the most somber realities of the job. One week is hardly time enough to assess the man elected to lead Philadelphia for 1,453 more days. It's barely the honeymoon phase.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|