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Michael Spinks

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SPORTS
June 27, 1988 | By RICH HOFMANN, Daily News Sports Columnist
Nothing has been easy for Michael Spinks. Nothing worth having, anyway. Now, it's true that the wise men in this world have been saying just that for a lot longer than prizefighters have been making millions of dollars a night, a lot longer than satellite dishes and decoders have been just about the most important pieces of equipment for a mega-money boxing match - almost as important as the fighters' gloves. While Mike Tyson is learning that universal axiom ("Into every life, a little mother-in-law must fall")
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office decided not to come out for the first round against former heavyweight boxing champion Michael Spinks. Assistant District Attorney Martin A. Durkin yesterday won a one-year delay in the start of Spinks' assault and harassment trial. The case had previously been listed five times and postponed for various reasons. When Spinks said he was satisfied not to be tried now, he signed a waiver of his right to a speedy trial. The new date is Aug. 22, 1990.
SPORTS
June 16, 1987 | By RICH HOFMANN, Daily News Sports Writer
Mike Tyson sat still for the television people, sat placidly for close to an hour in order to do a two-minute interview after Michael Spinks' rather decisive annihilation of Gerry Cooney. Tyson's impressions? He was most definitely impressed. "Spinks is great but I'm better . . .," Tyson said. "It was a splendid fight. "Michael Spinks did a tremendous job, a very professional job. He gave his best shots, took Cooney's best shots. I was very impressed. " The Spinks victory sets up the tantalizing possibility of a Spinks-Tyson fight for the undisputed heavyweight title, a fight that now would capture more than a few imaginations.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK CAPPUCCINO was humbled. He was about to referee one of the most important heavyweight boxing matches of the '80s, and he recalled looking out over the sold-out crowd in Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall and being dazzled. "I remember thinking, here I am a guy from Kensington, and I'm in the ring, looking out in the crowd, and I see people like Charlie Sheen, Jack Nicholson and Martin Sheen. It was really something special. " However, fans hardly got comfortable in their seats when the fight was over.
NEWS
June 29, 1988
Here were more than a million people waiting to watch the Tyson-Spinks fight on cable television. Each household paid $39.95 for the privilege. Here were 21,785 waiting in Atlantic City's Convention Center for another one of those "fights of the century. " Tickets were priced from $100 to $1,500, but they reportedly were being scalped for as much as $5,000. Here were all these sleepy-eyed people waiting for a major sporting event that was scheduled to begin at 11 p.m., but which was then delayed for 35 minutes while the fighters' managers debated over which fighter was to enter the ring first.
SPORTS
June 16, 1987 | By ELMER SMITH, Daily News Sports Writer
Gerry Cooney was about 4 1/2 rounds into his return last night when Michael Spinks reminded him why he had retired in the first place. Spinks provided the rude reminder about midway through the fifth round with a looping right hand that landed in the middle of what could have been Cooney's best punch of the night. Cooney saw an opening, drew back the fabled left hook. But Spinks stepped inside it and snapped Cooney's head back with a jolting right hand. Before Cooney knew what had hit him, Spinks peppered him with a fast flurry of unanswered left hooks and looping right hands.
SPORTS
July 21, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Given the economics of heavyweight title fights - at least heavyweight title fights involving Mike Tyson - tonight's scheduled 12-round bout between Tyson and Carl "The Truth" Williams almost qualifies as a charity affair. Tyson is receiving $4 million, Williams $1 million. Although the purse is by far the largest of Williams's career, and nearly six times the $175,000 he received for an unsuccessful challenge of then- heavyweight champion Larry Holmes in 1985, "The Truth" does not consider himself overpaid.
SPORTS
November 6, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
The two push-button house phones outside the main entrance of the vacant Trump Plaza hotel in Atlantic City remain. A sign outlining access rules concludes with "Trespassers will be prosecuted. " They may as well also take down the "Valet Only" sign. Nobody's allowed in the driveway. There's a big fight next door at Boardwalk Hall on Saturday, Bernard Hopkins against Sergey Kovalev for the light-heavyweight title. There will be a strong crowd. It just won't be quite like the old days, certainly not next door.
SPORTS
November 15, 2011 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
He fought his way up from humble beginnings as the son of a sharecropper in South Carolina to achieve worldwide fame. And on Monday morning, the life of the plainspoken and reserved Joe Frazier was remembered with eloquence and passion in a two-hour ceremony at Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church in East Mount Airy. Mr. Frazier, who moved to Philadelphia as a teenager, died Nov. 7 of liver cancer. He was 67. Three-time adversary Muhammad Ali paid his respects to the former heavyweight champion, as did fellow boxers Bernard Hopkins, Larry Holmes, and Michael Spinks, among others.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
There were two things I dearly missed during the seven weeks this newspaper wasn't publishing last fall. One was payday. The other was the chance to predict in print that Michael Spinks was going to relieve Larry Holmes of his custom-made International Boxing Federation heavyweight championship. Time flies. Abstemious living has almost overcome the loss of seven pay checks, and Spinks isn't as much of an underdog for his rematch with Holmes tomorrow night in Las Vegas.
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NEWS
June 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK CAPPUCCINO was humbled. He was about to referee one of the most important heavyweight boxing matches of the '80s, and he recalled looking out over the sold-out crowd in Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall and being dazzled. "I remember thinking, here I am a guy from Kensington, and I'm in the ring, looking out in the crowd, and I see people like Charlie Sheen, Jack Nicholson and Martin Sheen. It was really something special. " However, fans hardly got comfortable in their seats when the fight was over.
SPORTS
November 6, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
The two push-button house phones outside the main entrance of the vacant Trump Plaza hotel in Atlantic City remain. A sign outlining access rules concludes with "Trespassers will be prosecuted. " They may as well also take down the "Valet Only" sign. Nobody's allowed in the driveway. There's a big fight next door at Boardwalk Hall on Saturday, Bernard Hopkins against Sergey Kovalev for the light-heavyweight title. There will be a strong crowd. It just won't be quite like the old days, certainly not next door.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
In the ring, Mike Tyson obliterated opponents in the blink of an eye. The thunder-and-lightning pugilist once set a Junior Olympic record by knocking out an opponent in 8 seconds, and at 20 he was the youngest heavyweight champion in history. On stage at the Academy of Music on Thursday night, the 46-year-old Tyson had a daunting task before him that required more endurance than power and speed. In his one-man show, "Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth," the ex-champ was charged with entertaining an opera house crowd full of fight fans for nearly two hours, with only his life story to propel him. So how'd he do?
SPORTS
November 15, 2011 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
He fought his way up from humble beginnings as the son of a sharecropper in South Carolina to achieve worldwide fame. And on Monday morning, the life of the plainspoken and reserved Joe Frazier was remembered with eloquence and passion in a two-hour ceremony at Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church in East Mount Airy. Mr. Frazier, who moved to Philadelphia as a teenager, died Nov. 7 of liver cancer. He was 67. Three-time adversary Muhammad Ali paid his respects to the former heavyweight champion, as did fellow boxers Bernard Hopkins, Larry Holmes, and Michael Spinks, among others.
SPORTS
October 16, 2011
The U.S. rugby team defeated South Africa, 40-4, on Saturday at Campbell's Field in the first of three round-robin World Cup qualifying matches there this week. At stake for the winner of this group is a spot in the 2013 Rugby League World Cup. The United States next plays Jamaica, the other team in this group, next Sunday. South Africa plays Jamaica on Wednesday. GOLF: Fred Couples birdied six of the first seven holes and finished with a course-record 10-under 62 to take a 7-stroke lead in the Champions Tour's AT&T Championship.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
NEWS REPORTS say that legendary boxing promoter Butch Lewis died of a massive heart attack. That sounds about right to me. Because Butch had a massive heart. He was a paradox, a contradiction in terms. He was the original little big man, a fierce boardroom brawler who could strip you clean in a bargaining session, then become your most trusted partner when the deal was done. When he carried the shield for one of the fighters or entertainers he represented, Butch could be tough as nails.
SPORTS
June 13, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Michael Spinks stunned the boxing world in 1985 when he outfought undefeated Larry Holmes to become the first light-heavyweight to win a heavyweight title. That upset, along with Spinks' domination of the light-heavyweight ranks between 1981 and 1985, carried him into the International Boxing Hall of Fame yesterday in Canastota, N.Y. At 37, he became the youngest member of the Hall. "He was one of the greatest champions," said his onetime trainer, Eddie Futch, who was enshrined along with Spinks and 12 other former ring personalities.
NEWS
June 8, 1991 | By William R. Macklin, Special to The Inquirer
There's not much chance that Butch Lewis, flashy fight promoter turned bombastic music mogul, will lose his shirt on Monday's James Brown pay-per- view concert. But if he does, it won't be the first time. Nearly as well-known for strutting around in a tuxedo without a shirt as he is for his multimillion-dollar deals as manager/promoter for boxer Michael Spinks, Lewis is betting he won't take it on the chin in his first musical venture when the Godfather of Soul mounts the stage at Hollywood's Wiltern Theater.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office decided not to come out for the first round against former heavyweight boxing champion Michael Spinks. Assistant District Attorney Martin A. Durkin yesterday won a one-year delay in the start of Spinks' assault and harassment trial. The case had previously been listed five times and postponed for various reasons. When Spinks said he was satisfied not to be tried now, he signed a waiver of his right to a speedy trial. The new date is Aug. 22, 1990.
SPORTS
July 21, 1989 | By Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Given the economics of heavyweight title fights - at least heavyweight title fights involving Mike Tyson - tonight's scheduled 12-round bout between Tyson and Carl "The Truth" Williams almost qualifies as a charity affair. Tyson is receiving $4 million, Williams $1 million. Although the purse is by far the largest of Williams's career, and nearly six times the $175,000 he received for an unsuccessful challenge of then- heavyweight champion Larry Holmes in 1985, "The Truth" does not consider himself overpaid.
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