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Michael Weiner

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March 4, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stricter drug penalties? Wait till next year. On Saturday, commissioner Bud Selig held a news conference and put on his ermine mantle of leadership to say he wanted increased punishments for cheaters as soon as humanly possible, if not sooner. On Sunday, players union head Michael Weiner said increasing penalties for drug violations would not happen until 2014. "We're not going to change the rules of the game in the middle of the season," Weiner said. "In a sense, the drug-testing season started with spring training.
SPORTS
February 24, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The New York Times is reporting that Major League Baseball plans to test minor league players for human growth hormone. The newspaper, citing an unidentified baseball official with direct knowledge of the matter, reported on its Web site last night that MLB will implement blood tests that can reveal HGH use. On Monday, a British rugby league player became the first athlete to be suspended for using human growth hormone. Commissioner Bud Selig has used the minor leagues to introduce new steps against the use of performance-enhancing drugs before.
SPORTS
November 20, 2011 | Associated Press
Baseball players and owners have reached a tentative verbal agreement on a five-year labor contract and hope to have a signed deal by next week. The agreement, the first for the union since Michael Weiner succeeded Donald Fehr as head last year, would replace the deal expiring Dec. 11 and would give baseball 21 years of labor peace since the 1994-95 strike. Under the agreement, there will be a new restraint on the amount of money a team spends each year to sign selections from the amateur draft, with teams going over a threshold being penalized with a type of luxury tax. In addition, there will be a separate restraint on the amount of money spent to sign international amateur free agents from nations such as the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, and Cuba.
SPORTS
September 18, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Otis Nixon was given an unprecedented second chance by commissioner Fay Vincent after the Atlanta outfielder had a positive drug test in July. The commissioner said yesterday he was persuaded the test might be in error and "we were giving him the benefit of the doubt. " Nixon, however, was suspended Monday for 60 days after another test, taken Sept. 7, showed cocaine use six weeks later. Baseball officials said they didn't act on the first one because Nixon had passed more than 200 tests since 1987 and was involved with his aftercare program and his church.
SPORTS
December 18, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
A few days after admitting he used human growth hormone, Gary Bennett signed a free-agent contract yesterday to replace Mike Lieberthal as the Los Angeles Dodgers' backup catcher behind All-Star Russell Martin. Bennett, who played behind Lieberthal with the Phillies from 1995 to 2001, was among 85 players implicated last week in the Mitchell Report. He later told the Washington Post: "As far as the report is concerned to me, it's accurate. " Bennett, 35, played 59 games for St. Louis last season, batting .252 with two homers and 17 RBI. The Mitchell Report said Bennett bought two kits of HGH from former New York Mets clubhouse attendant Kirk Radomski in 2003.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - Baseball's labor contract expires at the end of this season. So far, at least, that hasn't caused the tension and angst or created the headlines that have marked ongoing negotiations between the NFL and the NBA and their players. Michael Weiner, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, met with members of the Baseball Writers Association of America yesterday. And while he cautioned that there is still work to be done, he also painted a picture of a sport that has largely moved beyond the sort of intransigent bargaining that occurred in previous years.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - One of the most powerful men in baseball was wheeled to the front of the ballroom. A microphone was lowered to his height. Michael Weiner, the executive director of the players union, cannot walk. He cannot use the right side of his body. A tumor in his brain will kill him. It has not yet robbed him of his ability to speak, or to fight for his constituency in what promises to be tumultuous months ahead. Major League Baseball is finalizing its Biogenesis investigation, one that commissioner Bud Selig described as "aggressive.
SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
BASEBALL players and owners signed an agreement for a new labor contract yesterday, a deal that makes baseball the first North American professional major league to start blood testing on human growth hormone and expands the playoffs to 10 teams by 2013. The 5-year deal collective bargaining agreement makes changes owners hope will increase competitive balance. An initial positive test for HGH would result in a 50-game suspension, the same as a first positive urine test for a performance-enhancing substance.
SPORTS
July 20, 2013
The players union may not go to bat for every player involved in baseball's latest drug investigation, especially the obvious cheaters. In an interview with the New York Daily News on Wednesday, union boss Michael Weiner said the MLB Players Association was "not interested" in protecting players for whom overwhelming evidence exists that they used performance-enhancing drugs. "I can tell you, if we have a case where there really is overwhelming evidence that a player committed a violation of the program, our fight is going to be that they make a deal," Weiner told the newspaper.
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SPORTS
July 20, 2013
The players union may not go to bat for every player involved in baseball's latest drug investigation, especially the obvious cheaters. In an interview with the New York Daily News on Wednesday, union boss Michael Weiner said the MLB Players Association was "not interested" in protecting players for whom overwhelming evidence exists that they used performance-enhancing drugs. "I can tell you, if we have a case where there really is overwhelming evidence that a player committed a violation of the program, our fight is going to be that they make a deal," Weiner told the newspaper.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - One of the most powerful men in baseball was wheeled to the front of the ballroom. A microphone was lowered to his height. Michael Weiner, the executive director of the players union, cannot walk. He cannot use the right side of his body. A tumor in his brain will kill him. It has not yet robbed him of his ability to speak, or to fight for his constituency in what promises to be tumultuous months ahead. Major League Baseball is finalizing its Biogenesis investigation, one that commissioner Bud Selig described as "aggressive.
SPORTS
March 4, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stricter drug penalties? Wait till next year. On Saturday, commissioner Bud Selig held a news conference and put on his ermine mantle of leadership to say he wanted increased punishments for cheaters as soon as humanly possible, if not sooner. On Sunday, players union head Michael Weiner said increasing penalties for drug violations would not happen until 2014. "We're not going to change the rules of the game in the middle of the season," Weiner said. "In a sense, the drug-testing season started with spring training.
SPORTS
February 26, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
BASEBALL UNION head Michael Weiner said Monday there have been talks about increasing the penalties for violating baseball's drug-testing program. "There are certainly some players who have expressed that," Weiner said. "We've had discussions with the commissioner's office. If it turns out that we have a different penalty structure because that's what players are interested in, that's what the owners are interested in, it will be for 2014. " Weiner spoke to the media after he met with the Toronto Blue Jays as part of his annual tour of spring training camps.
SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
BASEBALL players and owners signed an agreement for a new labor contract yesterday, a deal that makes baseball the first North American professional major league to start blood testing on human growth hormone and expands the playoffs to 10 teams by 2013. The 5-year deal collective bargaining agreement makes changes owners hope will increase competitive balance. An initial positive test for HGH would result in a 50-game suspension, the same as a first positive urine test for a performance-enhancing substance.
SPORTS
November 20, 2011 | Associated Press
Baseball players and owners have reached a tentative verbal agreement on a five-year labor contract and hope to have a signed deal by next week. The agreement, the first for the union since Michael Weiner succeeded Donald Fehr as head last year, would replace the deal expiring Dec. 11 and would give baseball 21 years of labor peace since the 1994-95 strike. Under the agreement, there will be a new restraint on the amount of money a team spends each year to sign selections from the amateur draft, with teams going over a threshold being penalized with a type of luxury tax. In addition, there will be a separate restraint on the amount of money spent to sign international amateur free agents from nations such as the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, and Cuba.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - Baseball's labor contract expires at the end of this season. So far, at least, that hasn't caused the tension and angst or created the headlines that have marked ongoing negotiations between the NFL and the NBA and their players. Michael Weiner, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, met with members of the Baseball Writers Association of America yesterday. And while he cautioned that there is still work to be done, he also painted a picture of a sport that has largely moved beyond the sort of intransigent bargaining that occurred in previous years.
SPORTS
July 13, 2011 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - Labor peace in baseball is calm compared to football and basketball, and that is a fact Bud Selig will not shy away from trumpeting. Weekly collective bargaining sessions began in April with the players' union, and there appear to be few issues holding up an agreement this winter. That does not preclude significant changes to integral parts of the game, such as the postseason system, regular-season schedule, and the alignment of divisions. Both sides appear ready and willing to enact change - especially in regard to realignment.
SPORTS
March 1, 2011 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - With his tousled black hair and his Converse-and-jeans attire and the blue Paper Mate Flair peeking out from his shirt, Michael Weiner looks more like a free-spirited English professor than a hardened labor attorney. In that respect, the 48-year-old executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association could serve as the figurehead for the softened relationship between the athletes he represents and their counterparts in the league office. But while Weiner might not possess the neatly trimmed white hair and freshly pressed suits of predecessor Donald Fehr, he does share a philosophy frequently espoused by the longtime union boss.
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