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Michelangelo

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NEWS
April 10, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When in 1516 he finished his statue of Moses, Michelangelo, according to legend, remarked that the stone image was so lifelike it looked as if it were ready to speak. Well, nearly 500 years later, it does. In Men of Stone, Seth Rozin's new play that Eureka Theatre is premiering at the Second Stage at the Adrienne, Michelangelo's marble Moses talks. As you may have guessed, Men of Stone is a comedy, so Rozin's come-to-life Moses, whom Michelangelo posed seated with the tablets bearing the Ten Commandments, doesn't resemble the great biblical figure.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jeramy Sims learned the hard way: Never be absent on the day class assignments are handed out. "If you do, you'll end up playing Jesus, like me," said Sims, a senior culinary-arts student at the Burlington County Institute of Technology, after he learned that he would be portraying Jesus in The Michelangelo Project. Sims portrayed Jesus in the arms of Mary in La Pieta, one of the greatest of Michelangelo's sculptures, while his classmates brought to life 11 other famous works by the famed Renaissance sculptor and painter, including the Madonna of the Stairs, Moses, David, Madonna with Child, and the Creation on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The moment Kenneth Ciongoli - South Philly boy-turned-Vermont doctor - joined the gala of 3,000 Italian Americans, his chiseled, serious face melted like winter breaking up on the White Mountains. Gone was the WASP reserve he employs as director of neurology at the University of Vermont Medical School. He was sitting at a table laden with Italian wines and waters, laughing and kissing and hugging old friends. He was telling family stories that nearly brought him to tears. He was even pronouncing his name differently, the old, rich, difficult way: Chi-ON-go-li.
LIVING
August 4, 1998 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Art historian Jack Wasserman hopes that with the aid of computer and camera technology he can crack an enigma that has perplexed experts for centuries. It is the enigma of the Florentine Pieta, one of Michelangelo's last sculptures. The statue is monumental - 7 1/2 feet tall. From a single block of Carrara marble Michelangelo carved four larger-than-life figures: the lifeless Christ descended from the cross, Mary Magdalene holding Christ in her arms, aided by Nicodemus looking down, with the grieving Virgin to his left.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Having said it once, we'll say it again: "Rodin and Michelangelo: A Study in Artistic Inspiration" is definitely not a blockbuster, whatever that hackneyed term has come to mean. The exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is something better - a handsome, focused examination of how one master sculptor inspired another. The exhibition is comfortably scaled; it makes its point without belaboring it. The installation is built around an imposing central tableau of Michelangelo casts that immediately establishes an appropriate mood, then dissolves effortlessly into a series of quiet, insightful juxtapositions.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A FULL-SIZE casting of a legendary Michelangelo sculpture will be on display at the Pennsylvania Convention Center this month, officials from the World Meeting of Families announced yesterday. Only 100 Vatican-sanctioned marble castings of "Pieta" exist, according to the World Meeting. The 1499 work depicts Jesus post-crucifixion in the arms of his mother, Mary. The World Meeting and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are hosting the replica in collaboration with Arte Divine, the Vatican Observatory Foundation's licensed distributor of Michelangelo replicas.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff writer
This revolution in the world of art, this controversial discovery about one of the greatest creations of the Renaissance, began with a look six years ago at someone's knee. Gianluigi Colalucci saw it first. As chief conservator for the Vatican Museums, he had spent six months perched on scaffolding 20 meters high - 66 feet - with the awesome job of trying to clean one small part of Michelangelo's famous painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. When he finished, Colalucci covered the restored area with a curtain and removed the scaffolding to get ready to show the restoration to his superiors.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the mention of Flemish baroque artist Peter Paul Rubens and his masterpiece Prometheus Bound , the first thing that comes to mind probably is not Spider-Man. And yet - why not? Is Prometheus, the titan who defied Zeus and stole fire from Mount Olympus and then bestowed it on humanity any less a tortured superhero than Spidey? He suffered terribly for his heroic act of aid and defiance. The infuriated Zeus had him chained to a rock where, every night, an eagle descended and savagely ripped out his perpetually regenerating liver.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tenors don't arrive quietly - it's just not their nature - though Nicholas Phan leaves me wondering why I didn't know about him sooner. He sang in the Philadelphia Orchestra/Pennsylvania Ballet's collaboration of Stravinsky's Pulcinella in the spring, but not until his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Friday could one take the full measure of his considerable talent, thanks to his passionate commitment to potentially fatal repertoire....
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NEWS
December 26, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
Kadir LaLena pushed his finger against the glass of the small tank in his mother's living room. Michelangelo, his pet turtle, was hiding. Gina LaLena guided the boy's hand. He'll come out, she said. He'll think it's food. Five years ago, Kadir came to LaLena as another foster child who required a bed for the weekend. She was divorced before age 25, was unable to conceive a child, and felt adrift. Hers was 5-year-old Kadir's 16th long-term home. He is autistic. He suffers from ADHD, sensory processing disorder, and other developmental delays.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Once again, it's that time of year when merry gentlemen and ladies go looking for books to give to friends and family. Real books. Beautiful books. Books you put on display, not away. Among the best this year is a comprehensive look at American still-life painting. Another reveals how Dutch painting in its heyday helped distinguish high from low in Dutch society. There's a book about the most-photographed 19th-century American and another about a well-traveled sphinx. There are books on the beauty of dragonflies, flowers, and even New Jersey, and much more.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A FULL-SIZE casting of a legendary Michelangelo sculpture will be on display at the Pennsylvania Convention Center this month, officials from the World Meeting of Families announced yesterday. Only 100 Vatican-sanctioned marble castings of "Pieta" exist, according to the World Meeting. The 1499 work depicts Jesus post-crucifixion in the arms of his mother, Mary. The World Meeting and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are hosting the replica in collaboration with Arte Divine, the Vatican Observatory Foundation's licensed distributor of Michelangelo replicas.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | Thomas Hine, for The Philadelphia Inquirer
Call it the season of the maker. Philadelphia has always been a center for crafts-based artists, but this fall more will be on view than usual. In conjunction with November's Craft NOW Philadelphia conference, several local institutions, including the Art Alliance, the Clay Studio, and the Center for Design in Wood, will show work by some of the area's acknowledged masters. Two shows will spotlight the monumental - or more accurately geological - porcelain sculpture of Paula Winokur.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the mention of Flemish baroque artist Peter Paul Rubens and his masterpiece Prometheus Bound , the first thing that comes to mind probably is not Spider-Man. And yet - why not? Is Prometheus, the titan who defied Zeus and stole fire from Mount Olympus and then bestowed it on humanity any less a tortured superhero than Spidey? He suffered terribly for his heroic act of aid and defiance. The infuriated Zeus had him chained to a rock where, every night, an eagle descended and savagely ripped out his perpetually regenerating liver.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission has unanimously designated as historic the frescoes of St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, the oldest of their kind in this country. They were painted in 1848, one year after the church, at 243 N. Lawrence St., alongside the Ben Franklin Bridge, was rebuilt. It was burned down during anti-Catholic riots in 1844, a time when Irish immigrants largely made up its thousands of parishioners. It's remarkable, historians say, that the frescoes have survived to the present day. "The Lord Seeth," inscribed above a massive fresco depicting the Crucifixion, appears at the front altar of the Old City church, built in a style reminiscent of Roman cathedrals.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
She boasted that she was called the "Michelangelo of buttocks injections," had performed hundreds of the cosmetic procedures, and counted many celebrities among her satisfied clients. But the women who sought out Padge Victoria Windslowe for "buttocks enhancement" were far from starlets. Most were naive 20-somethings in low-paying service-industry jobs with dreams of a more glamorous appearance but not the cash for a plastic surgeon. They were women like Stephanie Matos, 32, a New York hotel desk clerk who told a Philadelphia jury Thursday that she paid $1,000 to Windslowe in 2008 to inject her buttocks with what turned out to be "industrial-grade silicone.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo Hidalgo's art career spanned several countries and dozens of years, but it was a dance school that brought him to Philadelphia. Mr. Hidalgo, who was born in the Philippines, was already a well-established artist and professor there when his only daughter won a scholarship to Philadelphia's Rock School of Pennsylvania Ballet in 1992. Mr. Hidalgo moved the family to Philadelphia - where he kept painting - and ended up staying for the rest of his life. He died at home Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 78 after suffering a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget Jessica Simpson, Britney Spears or that Aguilera girl. The rockingest album by a woman is an old-school classic, 1967's I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You by Aretha Franklin. So proclaims the Delphic Oracle of rock, Rolling Stone mag. (Not even Madonna makes the top 10.) Joni Mitchell's Blue and Dusty Springfield's Dusty in Memphis round out the top three.   Oprah and Kim, Round XC Oprah Winfrey has released tidbits from her 90-part epic interview with Kim Kardashian, which will air on OWN until the end of time.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tenors don't arrive quietly - it's just not their nature - though Nicholas Phan leaves me wondering why I didn't know about him sooner. He sang in the Philadelphia Orchestra/Pennsylvania Ballet's collaboration of Stravinsky's Pulcinella in the spring, but not until his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Friday could one take the full measure of his considerable talent, thanks to his passionate commitment to potentially fatal repertoire....
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