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FOOD
October 25, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I've been enjoying some great fall flavors, especially at the Saturday farmer's market on Rittenhouse Square, where vendors like Hands on Earth Farm from Lititz were going apple crazy with sublimely soft and tangy apple cider caramels, flaky turnovers, and glazed homemade pop tarts that I liked a bit more than I expected. Reader: So, Michelin stars and why doesn't anyone in Philly have one? Do Vetri/Fountain/Zahav measure up?
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The president of Formula One's governing body thinks Michelin should compensate fans who bought tickets for the United States Grand Prix fiasco. "My personal view is that Michelin should offer to compensate the fans on a fair basis," Max Mosley said yesterday in an FIA statement. "Anyone who had a ticket this year would be entitled to the same ticket free of charge next year. " FIA already has accused the seven teams using Michelin tires of damaging the sport's image by pulling out of Sunday's grand prix at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
September 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The international automobile federation criticized Michelin yesterday for threatening to quit Formula One if teams have to use a single tire producer after 2008. FIA said the French tire producer had an "almost comical lack of knowledge of modern Formula One" over reform plans for the sport. The company, which provides tires for most F1 teams, threatened at the Belgian Grand Prix to leave the sport if the plans were adopted. "Michelin would be forced to question its involvement in Formula One in 2008," Michelin said in a statement.
FOOD
March 14, 1990 | The Inquirer staff
The 1990 Michelin guidebook awarded three stars on Monday to Alain Ducasse, 33, chef at the Louis XV restaurant in the Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo, Monaco, making him the youngest person ever to be so honored. But the gourmets' bible demoted L'Oustau de Baumaniere, a famous restaurant in Les Baux in southern France, to two stars after 35 years as a three-star restaurant. Michelin's famous red guide, which goes on sale today, thus continues honoring only 19 restaurants with three stars.
SPORTS
August 9, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Todd Bertuzzi, the Vancouver Canucks forward whose blindside punch left Colorado's Steve Moore with a broken neck, was reinstated by the NHL yesterday. Bertuzzi was suspended for the final 13 games of the 2003-04 regular season, for that season's Stanley Cup playoffs, and throughout last season's lockout. The suspension cost Bertuzzi $501,926.39 in salary. He is due to earn $5,269,333 from the Canucks this season. Moore might never play again because of the vicious blow by Bertuzzi during a game in Vancouver on March 8, 2004.
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Racer Danica Patrick yesterday said she is confused by remarks by Formula One president Bernie Ecclestone that likened women to "domestic appliances. " Patrick received a telephone call from Ecclestone last week, when he congratulated the Indy Racing League rookie for her performance in the Indianapolis 500. Among the comments Ecclestone made in an interview at the United States Grand Prix in Indianapolis - and to Patrick: "Women should be all dressed in white like all other domestic appliances.
SPORTS
June 21, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Nine-time New York City Marathon champion Grete Waitz has been diagnosed with cancer and is undergoing treatment in her native Norway. Mary Wittenberg, New York Road Runners president and CEO, and former president Allan Steinfeld have been in contact with Waitz and said in a statement she is in "excellent spirits. " Waitz, 51, won the New York City Marathon from 1978-80, 1982-86 and 1988, the London Marathon twice (1983, 1986), was world marathon champion in 1983, a five-time world cross-country champion and won silver in the marathon at the 1984 Olympics.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2011 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
Take it from a veteran cruiser with about 40 cruises under his belt. Dining on the all-suite, 376-passenger Silver Spirit was a rare gastronomic adventure. Clearly, the extraordinary meals were the highlight of a 14-day transatlantic cruise that included visits to Boston, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Ireland, Wales, and England. Each lunch and dinner had an artistic Michelin multi-star quality, with small portions of such exotic offerings as ostrich, eel, frog legs, wild boar, pigeon, caviar, and venison in addition to the usual steak, fish, seafood, fowl, and pasta entrees.
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | By Ron Bernthal FOR THE INQUIRER
Skenfrith, a tiny Welsh village of 500 residents, is surrounded by green hills, thousands of grazing sheep, and small farms. The picturesque ruins of a 13th-century Norman castle stand in the center of the village, and the free-flowing Monnow River, a natural habitat for trout, winds its way through idyllic pastures. From spring to fall, purple crocus, goldenrod, red clover and other wildflowers carpet the valley floor, creating a stunning quilt of colors. I viewed this scene from the dining-room windows at the Bell at Skenfrith, an upscale but rustically decorated pub, restaurant and inn that was recently named the Michelin 2007 Pub of the Year.
NEWS
June 29, 1986 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just about every state publishes brochures, calendars, maps and guides for tourists, and just about every state gives them away for free. But with its Liberty Passport, New York has elevated the art of freebie booklets to a wonderful plateau. The booklet contains 220 discount coupons that could save a diligent traveler $2,000. You get a 20 percent discount at an inn on Long Island; a two-for-one admission at a Washingtonville winery, called America's oldest; $20 off a balloon flight in the Adirondacks; 25 percent off the price of a meal at a restaurant in Plattsburgh; $5 off a river-rafting trip on the Black River; a free ticket to the New York City Opera, and 214 other discounts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 25, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I've been enjoying some great fall flavors, especially at the Saturday farmer's market on Rittenhouse Square, where vendors like Hands on Earth Farm from Lititz were going apple crazy with sublimely soft and tangy apple cider caramels, flaky turnovers, and glazed homemade pop tarts that I liked a bit more than I expected. Reader: So, Michelin stars and why doesn't anyone in Philly have one? Do Vetri/Fountain/Zahav measure up?
TRAVEL
October 16, 2011 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
Take it from a veteran cruiser with about 40 cruises under his belt. Dining on the all-suite, 376-passenger Silver Spirit was a rare gastronomic adventure. Clearly, the extraordinary meals were the highlight of a 14-day transatlantic cruise that included visits to Boston, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Ireland, Wales, and England. Each lunch and dinner had an artistic Michelin multi-star quality, with small portions of such exotic offerings as ostrich, eel, frog legs, wild boar, pigeon, caviar, and venison in addition to the usual steak, fish, seafood, fowl, and pasta entrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
IT'S ALWAYS RISKY to start off with a ridiculously theoretical concept from France, especially one named something as ridiculous as Le Fooding. But if we're going to talk about what's happening with the dining scene on 18th Street near Rittenhouse, we should bring a little French theory into our lives. Le Fooding - a combination of the English words "food" and "feeling" - is an anarchic, hard-to-describe movement that began more than a decade ago in Paris, created by two prominent critics who wanted to shake up the scene and challenge the authority, the tyranny of stuffy, traditional French dining.
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | By Ron Bernthal FOR THE INQUIRER
Skenfrith, a tiny Welsh village of 500 residents, is surrounded by green hills, thousands of grazing sheep, and small farms. The picturesque ruins of a 13th-century Norman castle stand in the center of the village, and the free-flowing Monnow River, a natural habitat for trout, winds its way through idyllic pastures. From spring to fall, purple crocus, goldenrod, red clover and other wildflowers carpet the valley floor, creating a stunning quilt of colors. I viewed this scene from the dining-room windows at the Bell at Skenfrith, an upscale but rustically decorated pub, restaurant and inn that was recently named the Michelin 2007 Pub of the Year.
SPORTS
September 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The international automobile federation criticized Michelin yesterday for threatening to quit Formula One if teams have to use a single tire producer after 2008. FIA said the French tire producer had an "almost comical lack of knowledge of modern Formula One" over reform plans for the sport. The company, which provides tires for most F1 teams, threatened at the Belgian Grand Prix to leave the sport if the plans were adopted. "Michelin would be forced to question its involvement in Formula One in 2008," Michelin said in a statement.
SPORTS
August 9, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Todd Bertuzzi, the Vancouver Canucks forward whose blindside punch left Colorado's Steve Moore with a broken neck, was reinstated by the NHL yesterday. Bertuzzi was suspended for the final 13 games of the 2003-04 regular season, for that season's Stanley Cup playoffs, and throughout last season's lockout. The suspension cost Bertuzzi $501,926.39 in salary. He is due to earn $5,269,333 from the Canucks this season. Moore might never play again because of the vicious blow by Bertuzzi during a game in Vancouver on March 8, 2004.
SPORTS
June 29, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Tire manufacturer Michelin offered yesterday to refund money to those who bought tickets for the U.S. Grand Prix, which was boycotted by seven Formula One teams after the company decided its tires were unsafe at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Michelin also said it would buy 20,000 tickets for the 2006 race to be given to those who attended the June 19 race during which only six of the typical 20 drivers participated. Reserved-seat tickets for this month's race ranged from $75 to $150.
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The president of Formula One's governing body thinks Michelin should compensate fans who bought tickets for the United States Grand Prix fiasco. "My personal view is that Michelin should offer to compensate the fans on a fair basis," Max Mosley said yesterday in an FIA statement. "Anyone who had a ticket this year would be entitled to the same ticket free of charge next year. " FIA already has accused the seven teams using Michelin tires of damaging the sport's image by pulling out of Sunday's grand prix at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Racer Danica Patrick yesterday said she is confused by remarks by Formula One president Bernie Ecclestone that likened women to "domestic appliances. " Patrick received a telephone call from Ecclestone last week, when he congratulated the Indy Racing League rookie for her performance in the Indianapolis 500. Among the comments Ecclestone made in an interview at the United States Grand Prix in Indianapolis - and to Patrick: "Women should be all dressed in white like all other domestic appliances.
SPORTS
June 21, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Nine-time New York City Marathon champion Grete Waitz has been diagnosed with cancer and is undergoing treatment in her native Norway. Mary Wittenberg, New York Road Runners president and CEO, and former president Allan Steinfeld have been in contact with Waitz and said in a statement she is in "excellent spirits. " Waitz, 51, won the New York City Marathon from 1978-80, 1982-86 and 1988, the London Marathon twice (1983, 1986), was world marathon champion in 1983, a five-time world cross-country champion and won silver in the marathon at the 1984 Olympics.
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