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Michelle Pfeiffer

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There are times when a memorable movie role showcases an actress's singular combination of looks, talent and style in a way that captures the public's attention. This is one of those times, and Michelle Pfeiffer, who stars in "The Fabulous Baker Boys," is the woman in the spotlight. She's become the person whose name is reached for when searching for a woman who represents the current ideal, the state of the art in being female. She's become a synonym for her gender's highest standard of comparison - "She's not bad, but she's no Michelle Pfeiffer.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | From Inquirer wire services
Movie stars Tom Hanks and Michelle Pfeiffer have been picked as man and woman of the year by Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals. The actress was cited for "Oscar-caliber performances that have defied typecasting" and the actor for his "sensitivity and gentleness. " Pfeiffer will get her award plus a parade on the university campus Feb. 13. Hanks gets the same treatment a week later. FAMILY PEACE Patti Davis, oft-estranged daughter of Ronald and Nancy Reagan, says her father's Alzheimer's disease has led to a reconciliation with her parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | By Ben Steelman, Special to The Inquirer
In Ladyhawke, Michelle Pfeiffer portrays Isabeau of Anjou, a truly distressed damsel of the Middle Ages. Cursed by a jealous bishop, poor Isabeau turns into a hawk by day, then returns to human form at sunset. Meanwhile, her true love - a gallant knight, played by Rutger Hauer - is transforming into a wolf, only to become a man again at sunrise. Each seems fated never to see the other again. Isabeau's dilemma could be a metaphor for Michelle Pfeiffer's early career. Critics, when they noticed her, gave the young Pfeiffer rave notices.
NEWS
December 8, 1990
Lewis Lapham, editor of Harper's, has presented a delightful gift to every woman left without hope by a Jane Fonda exercise video. Lapham's magazine has printed the bill for photo retouching services needed for pictures of the glamorous Michelle Pfeiffer in this month's Esquire. It took the cost of a new living room suite - $1,525 - to clean up Pfeiffer's complexion, add hair and trim her chin. "Women are constantly faced with perfection in magazines," said Lapham. But without help, even Michelle Pfeiffer doesn't measure up to Michelle Pfeiffer.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Day-care culture has created a pool of working parents who are ripe for exploitation. With a child in one place, parents in another, fear takes hold under even the best of circumstances, and where there is that much fear, there is also the potential for handsome profits. Hollywood cashed in with "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle. " The news media grabbed their share by flogging the case of Louise Woodward, the British nanny convicted of killing an infant, before a judge overturned the decision.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
These days, everybody's getting their shots in at Calista Flockhart, including William Shakespeare, who wrote her latest movie, "A Midsummer Night's Dream. " Flockhart has canceled many interviews related to the movie - backing out of TV appearances, etc. - because she doesn't want to answer questions about her weight, or lack of it. How ironic then, that she stars in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as Helena, a single gal who is jealous of her more popular, more buxom girlfriend Hermia.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Renee V. Lucas, Daily News Staff Writer
Not too far into "Tequila Sunrise," the viewer is forced to have a major battle with his conscience. You know drugs are bad. You know drug dealers are even worse. But . . . the dealer on screen is Mel Gibson. And well . . . he's not actually the dealer, but the middleman. And besides . . . he really is trying to get out of the business, it's just that nobody will let him. It's really not his fault! And so it goes with "Tequila Sunrise," Robert Town's smooth, sentimental story about one Dale "Mac" McKussic, the most sensitive criminal to come out of the box in a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Sex games in 18th-century France, a cynical look at today's legal system and an update of a classic novel are among the subjects of this week's new videos. DANGEROUS LIAISONS (1988) (Warner) $89.95. 120 minutes. Glenn Close, John Malkovich, Michelle Pfeiffer, Swoozie Kurtz, Uma Thurman, Keanu Reeves. The inspiration for this multiple Oscar nominee is the classic of erotic literature Les Liaisons Dangereuses, and there is indeed inspiration in every frame and aspect of this tale of malice in wonderland, as jaded aristos prey on one another just before the ax falls and the French Revolution arrives.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
"A Thousand Acres" has all the elements needed for a great movie. Two quality actresses - one who has won an Oscar, the other a multiple Oscar nominee, a script adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, and a supporting cast of talented actors. In an updated version of "King Lear," Rose Cook Lewis (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Ginny Cook Smith (Jessica Lange) play two sisters living on an Iowa farm. Their father, Larry (Jason Robards), is aging ungracefully and concerned with the future of his land.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
What lies beneath "What Lies Beneath" is an el stinko ending. Otherwise, it's a fairly decent spookfest that elicits many gasps from the audience. Most of the gasps I heard came from people impressed with the movie's featured house - I'm guessing a six-bedroom, lakeside mansion in New Hampshire ("Live Lavishly or Die"), home to Claire (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Norman Spencer (Harrison Ford), a researcher who does a little teaching at Billionaire U. The big mystery in "What Lies Beneath" is why Ford pulls up to this $3 million spread in an '89 Honda.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
People Like Us is one of those "inspired by true events" stories - a tagline so commonplace these days that its absence from the beginning of Ted comes as kind of a shock. The true events at the heart of Alex Kurtzman's alternately absorbing and maddening Los Angeles melodrama have to do with the director's discovery a few years back that he had a secret sibling. His father was in another marriage, another life, and hadn't let on. In Kurtzman's terribly titled feature debut, it is Sam Harper (Chris Pine)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
JUST AS THE ball drops in Times Square every year, the compilation movie is becoming an annual tradition. While the Brit-inflected "Love, Actually" (2003) is the mack daddy of the genre, the American counterparts began in earnest with "He's Just Not that Into You" (2009) and Garry Marshall's "Valentine's Day" (2010). Marshall continues his holiday streak with "New Year's Eve," celebrating the one day when, as Ashton Kutcher's bearded comic book artist puts it, "People who don't drink or party all year suddenly are going all Kanye on you. " As with "Valentine's Day," the stories of many freakishly attractive normals mix and mingle, coming together as the story sees fit, whether it's Zac Efron's bike messenger helping Michelle Pfeiffer's repressed secretary check off her resolutions or Jessica Biel and Seth Myers attempt to have the first baby born in 2012 in order to win a pile of cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's almost as much water in What Lies Beneath, Robert Zemeckis' impossibly derivative psychological thriller, as there is ocean washing over the decks of George Clooney's swordfish boat in The Perfect Storm. From the rippling-water title-sequence, to Michelle Pfeiffer's numerous immersions in the bathtub, to a couple of soggy swims in the nearby lake, to the slashing rain descending from the night sky, this Fatal Attraction-meets-The Sixth-Sense-with-a-detour-to-Rear-Window pastiche is wet, wet, wet. It's also dumb, dumb, dumb - borrowing scare tactics from Hitchcock and other suspense masters, but forgetting basic storytelling essentials such as character development and logical exposition.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
What lies beneath "What Lies Beneath" is an el stinko ending. Otherwise, it's a fairly decent spookfest that elicits many gasps from the audience. Most of the gasps I heard came from people impressed with the movie's featured house - I'm guessing a six-bedroom, lakeside mansion in New Hampshire ("Live Lavishly or Die"), home to Claire (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Norman Spencer (Harrison Ford), a researcher who does a little teaching at Billionaire U. The big mystery in "What Lies Beneath" is why Ford pulls up to this $3 million spread in an '89 Honda.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
These days, everybody's getting their shots in at Calista Flockhart, including William Shakespeare, who wrote her latest movie, "A Midsummer Night's Dream. " Flockhart has canceled many interviews related to the movie - backing out of TV appearances, etc. - because she doesn't want to answer questions about her weight, or lack of it. How ironic then, that she stars in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as Helena, a single gal who is jealous of her more popular, more buxom girlfriend Hermia.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Day-care culture has created a pool of working parents who are ripe for exploitation. With a child in one place, parents in another, fear takes hold under even the best of circumstances, and where there is that much fear, there is also the potential for handsome profits. Hollywood cashed in with "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle. " The news media grabbed their share by flogging the case of Louise Woodward, the British nanny convicted of killing an infant, before a judge overturned the decision.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
"A Thousand Acres" has all the elements needed for a great movie. Two quality actresses - one who has won an Oscar, the other a multiple Oscar nominee, a script adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, and a supporting cast of talented actors. In an updated version of "King Lear," Rose Cook Lewis (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Ginny Cook Smith (Jessica Lange) play two sisters living on an Iowa farm. Their father, Larry (Jason Robards), is aging ungracefully and concerned with the future of his land.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rock Hudson and Doris Day made something like 687 cute little sex comedies back in the late '50s and early '60s, all with the same formula: The twosome start out loathing each other and end up loving each other, and Tony Randall is usually fussing around someplace in the background. George Clooney and Michelle Pfeiffer strive mightily for the same kind of cute - and even resort to the same cornball split-screen telephone spats of Hudson and Day's Pillow Talk - in the frantic but pretty much flat One Fine Day. The big difference here: Best friend Randall has been replaced by a couple of pipsqueaks.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Forget anything you may have heard or read about the late Jessica Savitch being the inspiration for "Up Close & Personal. " Real life is never so satisfying to Hollywood as the stuff they already have lying around on celluloid, so while the credits may say the story was "suggested by" Alanna Nash's Savitch biography, "Golden Girl," it's a suggestion screenwriters Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne largely ignored. Instead, they've dished out "Broadcast News" meets "A Star Is Born," with a side order of "Pygmalion" to go. The rise of Tally Atwater (Michelle Pfeiffer)
LIVING
August 3, 1995 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She could kill with her bare hands, one of the students in English 11-P assured the others. Their new teacher, LouAnne Johnson, had never tried to kill anyone, but she didn't contradict him. "They thought either she's crazy or she can do it," Johnson remembered with a faint smile. "Either way, they didn't want to mess with me. " What else was a brand new student teacher - who happened to be an ex-Marine - to do when faced with a class of 34 tough inner-city teenagers who had already driven a teacher and three substitutes to the brink and whose very last desire was to sit through one more hour of sophomore English?
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