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Mickey Mantle

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SPORTS
August 16, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
They came to celebrate Mickey Mantle's heroism, these old Yankees, fans and family. And not just the golden moments from his Hall of Fame career, but his brave, final inning. Baseball said farewell and thanks to The Mick, remembering his glory and flaws at a funeral yesterday that drew tears from the overflow crowd - but also the kind of laughter that the Oklahoma country boy evoked with his wry humor. "It occurs to me as we're all sitting here thinking of Mickey, he's probably somewhere getting an earful from Casey Stengel, and no doubt quite confused by now," NBC broadcaster Bob Costas said in a warm and moving eulogy that frequently had laughter echoing off the walls of the Lovers Lane United Methodist Church.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Kaczor has collected sports memorabilia since he was a boy. Kaczor, a local real estate broker and former basketball coach at Bristol High and Holy Ghost Prep, cherished certain items in his collection - such as the 1953 autographed Mickey Mantle baseball card. He and his son Scott, now 25, had it autographed by Mantle when Scott was 5 and recovering from cancer surgery. The Mantle card, which Tom Kaczor values at about $3,200, and numerous other memories are gone now - stolen in a burglary of his Franklin Road home that he discovered Sunday.
SPORTS
August 14, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
Johnny Podres' eyes filled at the recollection of another departed friend, especially one he always believed was invincible. "He was so strong and so big," the Phillies' pitching coach said yesterday of Mickey Mantle. "He overshadowed everybody. He was electrifying when he walked anywhere. " Particularly for a Brooklyn Dodgers rookie facing the already legendary Yankee in the '53 World Series when Mantle walked into the batter's box. "If you ever saw him step up to the plate," said Podres, his smoky voice tinged with an awe that is rare in his hard-bitten sport.
SPORTS
June 7, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Some reactions to Mickey Mantle's illness from those around the Yankees: TONY KUBEK: "It's sad. It's a real shock. He's a good friend. I think of him probably more for his friendship than as a ballplayer. My wife always used to tell me, when she would bring my son to games, Mickey was one of the guys who stopped and talked to them. I think of him as a very warm human being. " BUCK SHOWALTER: "That's sad to hear about anybody, but for this organization it really hits home because you're talking about a person who has meant a great deal to the Yankee family.
SPORTS
August 14, 1995 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Here's what made Mickey Mantle special to his peers: Phillies pitching coach Johnny Podres was one of the National League's top lefthanders in his prime. "But when I pitched to Mickey Mantle in the World Series, my knees would start to shake," Podres remembered yesterday, a warm smile of remembrance creasing his weathered face. "Those big shoulders. He was so strong. The way he stared out at you. If you ever saw him step to the plate, you knew he was something special.
SPORTS
August 15, 1995 | Doug Darroch from Daily News wire reports
OH, THAT MICKEY MANTLE: One autumn before the end of his playing career, Mickey Mantle drove from his home in Dallas to nearby Fort Worth to attend a Texas-TCU football game. After the game, the Houston Chronicle recalled, Mantle stopped by the Texas locker room to say hello to coach Darrell Royal. When Royal shook his hand and said how pleased he was to meet him, Mantle grinned and said, "Darrell, we've met before. " "We have?" asked the embarrassed Royal. "When was that?"
SPORTS
August 14, 1995 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Eddie Layton, the Yankee Stadium organist, used to play from an open-air perch at the old Stadium, an afterthought of a location that was tacked on to the front of the mezzanine along the first-base line. And to that spot, Mickey Mantle would be able to call up a request for a song. But it was too slow. It wasn't "crowd" music. And so, Layton didn't play it - not until yesterday, the day Mantle died of cancer. Along with "Ave Maria," Layton began his pregame musical tribute by finally playing Mantle's favorite song: "Over the Rainbow.
SPORTS
August 14, 1995 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The story of Mickey Mantle's greatness was written on baseballs that wouldn't come back to earth. Maybe the Babe hit them farther. Perhaps Jimmie Foxx. But most of us have never seen a human being who hit home runs that defied gravity the way Mickey Mantle's home runs did. Not that there wasn't more to his stellar career than a tape measure, you understand. There was so much more that the hard part about singing the praises of Mickey Mantle is finding a way to stop. He was, by almost any standard, the greatest switch-hitting power hitter who ever lived.
SPORTS
August 14, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
When a prominent sports figure dies, the news usually rates nothing more than a brief mention on the nightly television sportscasts. But when someone of Mickey Mantle's stature dies, astute news and sports directors clear sufficient time to cover the story. All of yesterday's Philadelphia TV newscasts batted 1.000, wisely leading with Mantle's death. All included career highlights and reactions of friends and fans. But there was no commentary from current players, either Phillies or area minor leaguers, or former Phillies.
SPORTS
October 19, 1996 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
From home plate, Monument Park sits just beyond the right shoulder of Bernie Williams. Four stones, memorializing Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Miller Huggins and, this year, Mickey Mantle, provide the focus of Yankee Stadium's unique centerfield museum, a park that also includes 16 plaques. The names are from a time when New York grew its own, or at least plucked players from other organizations in the infancy, not the twilight, of their careers. Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, Berra, Mantle - it was a time when kids in faraway places dreamed of playing in this park, in this city.
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NEWS
June 9, 2013
Mantle and Mays, the Parallel Lives of Baseball's Golden Age By Allen Barra Crown Archetype. 498 pp. $27 Reviewed by Bill Lyon Once upon a time, though not so very long ago, there was delivered unto us from Mount Olympus two players of baseball. They ran like cheetahs and sent batted balls into the stratosphere and their throws trailed blue flame and very soon it became evident that the case could be made that these two were not just players of baseball but the two very best.
SPORTS
October 7, 2012 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
The camera caught him coming in low and aiming high, like a rolling ball of butcher knives, a middle linebacker steaming along on the base paths, his uniform pigsty filthy with a warrior's colors, telling you he's down and dirty, his face contorted with the effort, seeking out a collision, and you are struck with this thought: The prudent man steps aside. Mike Trout, coming through. Here is how he is introduced in the antiseptic world of cyberspace: Michael (Mike) Nelson Trout.
NEWS
April 17, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
When Tiger Woods had trouble with his putter, he became a national conversation. Brett Favre made an off-field pass, and we reveled via Twitter. After Cameron Diaz fed popcorn to Alex Rodriguez at the Super Bowl, America feasted. It's easy to forget that it wasn't always like this. Just as the reporters covering FDR overlooked his debilitating condition and JFK was given a pass in the media for his dalliances, sports figures, too, were once immune to the post-Watergate world of invasive coverage.
SPORTS
December 22, 2010
YOU WILL LIKE "Unbroken" by Laura Hillenbrand. It's about an Olympic distance runner named Louie Zamperini who becomes an Air Force bombardier on a rickety B-24. Crash-lands in the Pacific, scrambles onto a life raft, the start of a grim nightmare, bedeviled by ruthless sharks, most of them human. Hillenbrand is the talented woman who wrote "Seabiscuit," a brilliant book about a charismatic racehorse. Her ear is keen, her writing crisp, the story memorable. You will like "Making Words Dance," reflections on Red Smith, the unforgettable choreographer/wordsmith.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010
Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood By Jane Leavy Harper. 480 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Bill Lyon There were those home runs, of course, those towering, titanic, majestic tape-measure launches, struck with equal ferocity from both sides of the plate, leaving his peers slack-jawed in awe as batted balls traveled to places previously unreached. And there were those blondes, of course, platoons of them, lush and warm and willing, an endless, accommodating supply, unashamedly brazen and softly solicitous, and as they would walk away to another hotel elevator, his peers would gape in undisguised envy.
NEWS
November 23, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hundreds of fans of baseball legend Mickey Mantle turned out yesterday in New York for the sale of his memorabilia and in less than three hours bought up everything from a lock of his hair to a tuxedo and boat. The lock of hair, which Mantle gave to his longtime girlfriend and agent, Greer Johnson, as a joke, was sold for $6,900. It had been expected to bring in up to $600. In all, $541,880 was raised from the auction, to which Mantle's family had been strongly opposed. On Friday, lawyers representing Mantle's widow and Johnson worked out a compromise that cleared the way for the auction.
SPORTS
October 19, 1996 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
From home plate, Monument Park sits just beyond the right shoulder of Bernie Williams. Four stones, memorializing Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Miller Huggins and, this year, Mickey Mantle, provide the focus of Yankee Stadium's unique centerfield museum, a park that also includes 16 plaques. The names are from a time when New York grew its own, or at least plucked players from other organizations in the infancy, not the twilight, of their careers. Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, Berra, Mantle - it was a time when kids in faraway places dreamed of playing in this park, in this city.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Kaczor has collected sports memorabilia since he was a boy. Kaczor, a local real estate broker and former basketball coach at Bristol High and Holy Ghost Prep, cherished certain items in his collection - such as the 1953 autographed Mickey Mantle baseball card. He and his son Scott, now 25, had it autographed by Mantle when Scott was 5 and recovering from cancer surgery. The Mantle card, which Tom Kaczor values at about $3,200, and numerous other memories are gone now - stolen in a burglary of his Franklin Road home that he discovered Sunday.
SPORTS
October 12, 1995 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
A famous retired baseball player recently encountered his former agent on a commercial flight between two major cities. The duo had parted some years before, less than amicably, but the agent had retained an extensive inventory of autographed photos, baseballs, bats and other items. The ex-ballplayer said to the agent, "Well, I guess you're sitting pretty with all the autographed stuff of mine you have. " The agent replied, "Not as well off as I'll be when you die. " Well, the ex-ballplayer was not Mickey Mantle, but the result is the same.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
In the final frantic days before Mickey Mantle's death, a Philadelphia physician was brought in to consult on the baseball star's deteriorating condition. The physician, Dr. Isaac Djerassi, an oncologist from Mercy Catholic Medical Center at Misericordia Hospital, flew to Dallas and examined Mantle at Baylor University Medical Center. Djerassi's presence at Mantle's bedside was unexpected because his cancer- fighting technique, considered state of the art 25 years ago, has been abandoned by leading oncologists.
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