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Micky Dolenz

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NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
One question raged in pre-teen circles when the Monkees - that fabricated quartet of winsome, clean-cut poprockers - made it big in the 1960s. Who was really the cutest of the group, their admirers wondered. Was it slow-thinking Micky Dolenz or quiet Peter Tork? Was it Mike Nesmith, the serious Monkee, or diminutive, British Davy Jones? The question rages anew in the 1980s. And if a poll had been taken yesterday of the shrieking Monkees fans who gathered at the Cherry Hill Mall, Davy Jones would have emerged the winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2010 | By GARY GRAFF, Billboard.com
A Monkee will pay tribute to a King this summer - Carole King, that is. Micky Dolenz, the Monkees' self-described "wacky drummer," will release "King for a Day" on Aug. 24, featuring his versions of 15 songs written or co-written by the recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, whose contributions to the Monkees legacy includes the hit "Pleasant Valley Sunday. " "It's a very exciting project," Dolenz told Billboard.com. "She wrote so many different types of tunes. If you look at my album, things from 'Crying in the Rain' to 'Don't Bring Me Down' to 'Up on the Roof,' the spectrum is as wide as you can possibly get. " King and longtime musical cohort James Taylor will perform Thursday at the Wachovia Center as part of their Troubadour Tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
It's been an intense year for Micky Dolenz, the singer, drummer, and director first made famous by his time as one of the Monkees, pop music's first televisual confection. And his time continues: The band is on the road for a 12-date tour that takes them to the Keswick Theatre on Thursday. This year Dolenz released a solo album, Remember , in which he covers songs most important to him, with cool stories attached. He covers the Beatles' "Good Morning, Good Morning" - because he was present, at Paul McCartney's invitation, during that tune's original recording for Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
'Once upon a time" - as Peter Tork once succinctly narrated the Monkees' story - "four lads got together, not entirely by their own choice. " Over the course of nearly 50 years, the Monkees have evolved from a thrown-together sitcom cash-in on the mop-topped bands of the 1960s to pop icons on a par with those classic rockers. The reunion of Tork, Micky Dolenz, and Michael Nesmith at the Keswick on Thursday marked Nesmith's first U.S. tour with the band since 1969. Plans took shape after the sudden death of Davy Jones in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the television screen, the Monkees are zany, capery, wild and reckless . . . But they are, off the screen, four terribly serious young men with an organized plan for the future. Or so they claim. "Now that the Beatles are practically ready for retirement," say the Monkees with earnest faces, "the future of show business is going to be up to us!" - "The Monkees Go Mod" Hey, hey, it's official, with a proclamation from the Honorable W. Wilson Goode and everything: The city is in the throes of Monkees Weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Davy Jones was discussing the rigors of rehearsal, the wear and tear on the legs caused by cavorting on a practice stage. "The thing is," he said, "I'm not supposed to be 40 years old - I'm supposed to be 20. " Jones, you see, is a Monkee - one of the three Monkees who are together again for a 20th anniversary reunion tour that will begin at the Tropicana Hotel & Casino tonight. Joining him will be Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork (Michael Nesmith is not making the tour). And, yes, they're all supposed to be 20. They were freeze-dried at that age by television and a hit series, The Monkees, that turned these lads into instant superstars and darlings of the teeny-bopper set. It was a giddy ride on top, even though it lasted less than three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The Monkees, who will perform two shows today at the Mann Music Center, are one of the oddest pop phenomenons in the history of rock music. Conceived in cynicism, dedicated to the crassest commercialism, the Monkees nonetheless produced music that is still fun to listen to - their best work holds up. This judgment is based on a recent listen to Then & Now . . . The Best of the Monkees (Arista), a fine collection of the Monkees' greatest hits, plus one new song, "That Was Then, This Is Now. " Then & Now collects virtually all the Monkees' music worth owning, including such big hits as "Last Train to Clarksville," "I'm a Believer," "Pleasant Valley Sunday" and "Daydream Believer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Hey, hey we're the Monkees People thought we monkeyed around But TV's made us stars again And now we're coming to your town!!! "We didn't exactly invent music videos," allows Monkee man Micky Dolenz. "After all, movie musicals had been around for decades. "But the Monkees were the first rock group created for TV and made by television. It blew the music establishment's mind, because we went around the system, 'cause we didn't 'pay our dues.' And some thick-headed critics killed us for not being self-contained, a 'real group.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Twentieth anniverary reunion tours come along only once in a lifetime, and for sure the Monkees milked theirs to the hilt last year. Bolstered by the timely revival of the group's mid-1960s comedy and music series on MTV, Nickelodeon and syndicated TV, the three-quarter strength original (Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones, sans Michael Nesmith) Monkees played live last year to two million people - "almost a whole percentage point of the population," marvels Peter Tork. I found their cheerful, cheezy rock and stage antics surprisingly durable and amusing, making a perfect outing for the three generations (6-to-60 year olds)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
So, northeastern Pennsylvania may have a tiger running loose? Big deal. Rock and roll animals will be crawling all over Philadelphia this weekend, as a major invasion of Monkee-mania hits us where we live. At TLA Cinema, the maniacs will enjoy screenings of the simians' psychedelic rock fantasy, "Head. " Sunday afternoon and evening at the Mann Music Center, three of the Pre-Fab Four will be on stage for the 20th anniversary reunion concert of the Monkees, also featuring moldy oldies Gary Puckett & the Union Gap and Herman's Hermits (minus Peter Noone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
'Once upon a time" - as Peter Tork once succinctly narrated the Monkees' story - "four lads got together, not entirely by their own choice. " Over the course of nearly 50 years, the Monkees have evolved from a thrown-together sitcom cash-in on the mop-topped bands of the 1960s to pop icons on a par with those classic rockers. The reunion of Tork, Micky Dolenz, and Michael Nesmith at the Keswick on Thursday marked Nesmith's first U.S. tour with the band since 1969. Plans took shape after the sudden death of Davy Jones in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
It's been an intense year for Micky Dolenz, the singer, drummer, and director first made famous by his time as one of the Monkees, pop music's first televisual confection. And his time continues: The band is on the road for a 12-date tour that takes them to the Keswick Theatre on Thursday. This year Dolenz released a solo album, Remember , in which he covers songs most important to him, with cool stories attached. He covers the Beatles' "Good Morning, Good Morning" - because he was present, at Paul McCartney's invitation, during that tune's original recording for Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2010 | By GARY GRAFF, Billboard.com
A Monkee will pay tribute to a King this summer - Carole King, that is. Micky Dolenz, the Monkees' self-described "wacky drummer," will release "King for a Day" on Aug. 24, featuring his versions of 15 songs written or co-written by the recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, whose contributions to the Monkees legacy includes the hit "Pleasant Valley Sunday. " "It's a very exciting project," Dolenz told Billboard.com. "She wrote so many different types of tunes. If you look at my album, things from 'Crying in the Rain' to 'Don't Bring Me Down' to 'Up on the Roof,' the spectrum is as wide as you can possibly get. " King and longtime musical cohort James Taylor will perform Thursday at the Wachovia Center as part of their Troubadour Tour.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
One question raged in pre-teen circles when the Monkees - that fabricated quartet of winsome, clean-cut poprockers - made it big in the 1960s. Who was really the cutest of the group, their admirers wondered. Was it slow-thinking Micky Dolenz or quiet Peter Tork? Was it Mike Nesmith, the serious Monkee, or diminutive, British Davy Jones? The question rages anew in the 1980s. And if a poll had been taken yesterday of the shrieking Monkees fans who gathered at the Cherry Hill Mall, Davy Jones would have emerged the winner.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Twentieth anniverary reunion tours come along only once in a lifetime, and for sure the Monkees milked theirs to the hilt last year. Bolstered by the timely revival of the group's mid-1960s comedy and music series on MTV, Nickelodeon and syndicated TV, the three-quarter strength original (Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones, sans Michael Nesmith) Monkees played live last year to two million people - "almost a whole percentage point of the population," marvels Peter Tork. I found their cheerful, cheezy rock and stage antics surprisingly durable and amusing, making a perfect outing for the three generations (6-to-60 year olds)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the television screen, the Monkees are zany, capery, wild and reckless . . . But they are, off the screen, four terribly serious young men with an organized plan for the future. Or so they claim. "Now that the Beatles are practically ready for retirement," say the Monkees with earnest faces, "the future of show business is going to be up to us!" - "The Monkees Go Mod" Hey, hey, it's official, with a proclamation from the Honorable W. Wilson Goode and everything: The city is in the throes of Monkees Weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The Monkees, who will perform two shows today at the Mann Music Center, are one of the oddest pop phenomenons in the history of rock music. Conceived in cynicism, dedicated to the crassest commercialism, the Monkees nonetheless produced music that is still fun to listen to - their best work holds up. This judgment is based on a recent listen to Then & Now . . . The Best of the Monkees (Arista), a fine collection of the Monkees' greatest hits, plus one new song, "That Was Then, This Is Now. " Then & Now collects virtually all the Monkees' music worth owning, including such big hits as "Last Train to Clarksville," "I'm a Believer," "Pleasant Valley Sunday" and "Daydream Believer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
So, northeastern Pennsylvania may have a tiger running loose? Big deal. Rock and roll animals will be crawling all over Philadelphia this weekend, as a major invasion of Monkee-mania hits us where we live. At TLA Cinema, the maniacs will enjoy screenings of the simians' psychedelic rock fantasy, "Head. " Sunday afternoon and evening at the Mann Music Center, three of the Pre-Fab Four will be on stage for the 20th anniversary reunion concert of the Monkees, also featuring moldy oldies Gary Puckett & the Union Gap and Herman's Hermits (minus Peter Noone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Hey, hey we're the Monkees People thought we monkeyed around But TV's made us stars again And now we're coming to your town!!! "We didn't exactly invent music videos," allows Monkee man Micky Dolenz. "After all, movie musicals had been around for decades. "But the Monkees were the first rock group created for TV and made by television. It blew the music establishment's mind, because we went around the system, 'cause we didn't 'pay our dues.' And some thick-headed critics killed us for not being self-contained, a 'real group.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Davy Jones was discussing the rigors of rehearsal, the wear and tear on the legs caused by cavorting on a practice stage. "The thing is," he said, "I'm not supposed to be 40 years old - I'm supposed to be 20. " Jones, you see, is a Monkee - one of the three Monkees who are together again for a 20th anniversary reunion tour that will begin at the Tropicana Hotel & Casino tonight. Joining him will be Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork (Michael Nesmith is not making the tour). And, yes, they're all supposed to be 20. They were freeze-dried at that age by television and a hit series, The Monkees, that turned these lads into instant superstars and darlings of the teeny-bopper set. It was a giddy ride on top, even though it lasted less than three years.
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