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BUSINESS
September 4, 1998 | By Dave Wilson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Microsoft Corp. attorneys argued yesterday that a government proposal to broaden the scope of its landmark antitrust case against the company was unfair and should be rejected. If the case is expanded, they said, they might require extra months to prepare a defense. Federal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson said at a hearing that he would decide on the Microsoft request next week. He also ordered the software giant to comply with the government's request for internal company documents that relate to the disputed expansion of the case.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2005 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
As Microsoft Corp. was punished by South Korea yesterday for breaching antitrust rules, the company announced it would nearly double its workforce in India over the next four years, investing $1.7 billion and adding 3,000 jobs in a vote of confidence in one of the world's fastest-growing markets. The Korea Fair Trade Commission ordered the company to sell multiple versions of its Windows operating system and pay a $32 million fine. Microsoft will appeal, said company attorney Tom Burt.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Kevin Werbach
"I want to keep the information superhighway from resembling a red-light district. " That was Jim Exon, then Democratic senator from Nebraska, speaking before Congress in 1995. He had just introduced the Communications Decency Act (CDA), a misguided effort to thwart pornographers and pedophiles by prohibiting indecent speech on the Internet. The Supreme Court unanimously overturned the CDA, finding that it violated the First Amendment. In the years since, we've learned some things about the Internet.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Supreme Court rejected Microsoft Corp.'s appeal of its antitrust case yesterday, clearing the way for the company and the government to try to settle the case. Microsoft sought a new trial, contending that U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's comments to reporters created an appearance of bias that infected the case. An appeals court removed Jackson and overturned part of his order - to split the No. 1 software-maker into two companies - but it upheld his finding that Microsoft had broken antitrust law and thus thwarted competition.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | by Virginia Postrel
A federal judge has made it official: Microsoft is a monopoly, a two-ton bully that squashes competitors and cheats consumers. Still, no matter how much the government lawyers crow or Bill Gates complains, the fact is that the real future of the software industry is already being decided entirely outside the court system, in a technological marketplace too fast-moving and too accepting of good new ideas to be artificially held in check. In his findings of fact issued on Friday, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson concluded that Microsoft had hindered technological creativity - that its attempts to protect the profits from its core products would prevent innovations that would benefit consumers.
NEWS
December 27, 1997
There must be some moments in Bill Gates' rich life when he wonders whether Janet Reno has a voodoo doll with his face on it. How else to explain the number of people lining up to stick it to him and Windows, his software package that runs almost 95 percent of personal computers sold in America? From the Justice Department to a group of state attorneys general, Microsoft has been collecting as many critics in government as it has in the computer industry. Microsoft has started making some forays into the political world of Washington and will no doubt start spreading its largess to curry favor.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. has filed suit against nine companies in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, accusing them of selling or installing counterfeit or unlicensed software. Four Pennsylvania companies were named: L&M Computers in Philadelphia, R30 Computers in Berwyn, Camera Sound in Berwyn, and SWM Systems in Denver, Lancaster County. The New Jersey companies named were Laser Computer & Networking Inc. in Pemberton and Griggs Communications in Northfield. The suits were filed in U.S. District Court in the three states.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | By Matthew Miller
If you've doubted whether Microsoft is a monopoly that needs to be broken up, consider this previously unreported fact: Microsoft's after-tax return on invested capital, the best measure of a firm's profitability, was a stunning 88 percent last year. This means Microsoft was 13 times more profitable than other major U.S. corporations. That's the headline from a "friend of the court" brief just filed by four top economists led by Robert Litan of the Brookings Institution, which adds that "this is the most impressive ... demonstration of the economic returns to monopoly that we have ever seen.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talk about revenge of the nerds. Bill Gates, looking every bit of his 31 years, just shrugged off the question about his loss, on paper, of $126.5 million in Friday's stock market swoon and turned the talk to other topics. He was in town Saturday to introduce a new piece of computer software created by his company, Microsoft Inc., and his mind was clearly more on that mission than on any nine-figure hits to his personal balance sheet. "Hey," he said, focusing his eyes somewhere out in space, as he frequently does, "I own 40 percent of the company, and I know what that's worth better than the market does.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The emperor may have no clothes, but he is still the emperor. And so last week, just two days after a federal judge ruled that Microsoft had illegally undercut its rivals, ruthlessly squashed competition, and thrown up roadblocks to innovations that would have broadened consumers' choices, chairman Bill Gates boldly turned up at the White House to play out his starring role in a presidential conference on technology and the world economy....
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BUSINESS
July 29, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Tech innovation, higher productivity, and zealous competitiveness in the global arena are the keys to improving the U.S. economy. They are also the hot-button money issues that should be pushed in the 2016 presidential campaign, rather than the time-honored arguments for lowering taxes, shrinking government, and reducing regulations. So argues the nonpartisan Information Technology and Information Foundation whose leadership is split evenly between Republican and Democratic leaders. And at a meeting Wednesday in the Kimmel Center, IT&IF president Robert Atkinson found the agenda endorsed by several members of the U.S. House of Representatives, a major drug industry leader, a Harvard Business School professor, and well-placed executives from Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook, all in town for the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. is opening a 3,800-square-foot outreach center in University City, its first such facility in the Philadelphia area and its third nationwide, the Redmond, Wash.-based tech giant said in a release on Monday. The Microsoft Innovation Center will open this summer at the 3711 Market St. headquarters building of the University City Science Center business incubator and research hub, according to the release. The Microsoft facility will offer opportunities for entrepreneurs, students and community members to use and receive training in the company's tools and technology, Science Center spokeswoman Kristen Fitch said.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When newly developed software works - when clients start buying it - the talk gets big fast: "We are changing the way code is built," says Chris Gali, cofounder of Enterprise Cloudworks , from the conference room past the pool table in his high-rise offices at 1818 Market St. "Right now, we are 52 people. By the end of the year, we will be 75. My belief is that in two and a half years, we'll be 350, right here on Market Street, Philadelphia," says Jim Rourke, the firm's president.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen is giving $100 million to establish the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. The donation was announced Monday in Philadelphia at the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology. Allen's new nonprofit group will focus on the relationship between human genetic information, cell development, and cell behavior. The goal, Allen said in a news release, is to create a "comprehensive, predictive model of the cell.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Indian American engineer Satya Nadella took over from Steve Ballmer as CEO of Microsoft in February, shares of the software giant that gave the world Windows, Excel, and Exchange have gained $100 billion on the stock market. It's now worth as much as Google , more than any U.S. company but Apple or ExxonMobil . Wall Street believes in Microsoft again, even after it reported a loss last quarter, laid off 18,000 Nokia workers and other employees, shut its Xbox Entertainment Studios , and has seen its sky-high profit margins slip a bit each year with competitors on many fronts.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
ISSUE | HIGHWAY SPEEDS Limits of sanity on region's roads In a more sane bygone period when the mandatory speed limit was 55 m.p.h., there were fewer accidents, lives lost, and billions of gallons of gas saved ("Much of turnpike may rise to 70 m.p.h.," July 24). With the now-insane increase in the speed limit to 70 m.p.h., we will see more carnage on the road. Why the need for speed? For those who might get to the office or home 15 minutes sooner, what do you do? Hug your wife?
BUSINESS
May 9, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s $45.2 billion deal for Time Warner Cable Inc. will get another public airing in Washington on Thursday with a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. This is the second hearing on Capitol Hill over the giant merger; the Senate Judiciary Committee held one last month. Though Congress cannot derail the deal or negotiate conditions, the hearings are a forum for opponents and lawmakers to voice concerns and raise issues. Former Justice Department antitrust attorney Allen P. Grunes is among those scheduled to testify.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
H ELLO, MISS. This is Microsoft tech support and we have detected a serious virus in your computer and we need you to log on right away so we can help you. That's what the male voice said on the phone. He was insistent, almost in a panic, to help Somerton's Pat McGlone defend herself against a destructive virus that was attacking her computer. Something about the call made retiree McGlone's "antenna go up. " First, they didn't get her name right. Second, they sounded foreign "and I know there's all these Nigerian scams going on," she says.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2013 | By Barbara Ortutay and Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Microsoft Corp. is reshuffling its business in an attempt to promote faster innovation and a sharper focus on devices and services. The move by the world's largest software maker comes amid lukewarm response to the latest version of its flagship Windows operating system and a steady decline in demand for PCs as people turn to tablets and other mobile gadgets. CEO Steve Ballmer said in a memo to employees Thursday that the changes mean the company is "rallying behind a single strategy" and organizing by function.
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