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Middle And High School

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NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education will vote Monday night whether to ratify a tentative two-year contract agreement with district professional and support staff that increases instructional time for middle and high school students by a half-hour a day and increases elementary teachers' time in school by the same amount. Members of the 1,070-member Cherry Hill Education Association approved the contract Thursday by a sizable majority, said union president Martin Sharofsky. The increase in middle and high school instruction time, which will be added to the beginning of the school day starting next fall, amounts to about 14 additional days, the district said in a statement.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Robert Maranto
Philadelphia's public charter schools have been under fire lately. First were revelations last spring that two of the city's 60 charter operators paid themselves outlandish salaries. More recently, the Philadelphia School District released a report claiming that charters cost the district $105 million annually. The writing is on the wall: The Philadelphia School District has declared war on charter schools. That's a shame, because the evidence shows that charters are the only public schools without selective admissions policies that can teach hard-to-reach urban adolescents.
NEWS
December 7, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Ridley School District yesterday launched a district-wide curriculum entitled Squashing the Millennium Bug to discuss such Y2K worries as food shortages and power failures. The goal of the program is to talk to the district's 5,706 students about Y2K and to help eliminate fears, said Nicholas Ignatuk, district superintendent. Lessons specifically designed for elementary, middle and high school students grew out of the district's Y2K readiness plan, he said. "It dawned on me that Y2K might be an issue for the students.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1987 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
The Walt Whitman Center presents the Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble in two 60-minute lecture/demonstration performances at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at Camden High School, Baird Avenue and Park Boulevard. Audience participants are being drawn from local high schools and theater-arts training schools. Info: 609-757-7276. COOKING WITH YIN & YANG The Free Library's five-part film series on life in China continues with two documentaries "Food for Body and Spirit" and "All Under Heaven," 7 p.m., at the Central Library's Montgomery Auditorium, 19th and Vine streets.
NEWS
December 17, 2006 | By Matt Sandy FOR THE INQUIRER
The staying power of 12- to 18-year-olds often eclipses their spending power, leading to charges of loitering. To combat this issue, Mayor Tom Grady and Narberth Borough have unveiled Gnarbucks (or gNarbucks, depending on whom you ask), a coffeehouse for middle and high school students. Housed in the Narberth Community Theatre building at the United Methodist Church of Narberth, Gnarbucks held its inaugural gatherings Dec. 1 for middle schoolers and Dec. 2 for high schoolers.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of anxious parents packed the auditorium as their kids lined hallways and swarmed around teachers in classrooms, clutching sheet music and instruments. The mission: excel at a Saturday morning audition, wowing teachers to be selected into the hypercompetitive Girard Academic Music Program, one of the city's few magnet schools at the middle school level and the only one specializing in music. The South Philadelphia middle and high school also has a strong academic curriculum, and always attracts many more applicants than it can accept.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On misty nights, the odor drifts along East Chocolate Avenue, across the spot where "the founder" once ate his crab cakes and salad, and wafts around the catalpa and maple trees of Chocolatetown Square. It comes from the factory up the street, this eternally benign smell of chocolate; stealing down a boulevard where street lights and shrubbery are shaped liked Hershey Kisses and silos filled with cocoa beans tower in the background. But this fall, as the sweet fog of chocolate has drifted around the square's gazebo in the candy maker's happy town, it has been soured by bitter voices and curdled with fear and accusation.
FOOD
September 30, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
When it comes to school lunches, Joan Nachmani is pretty much an authority. She knows what students like to eat and what they don't like to eat. She also knows what's good for them - which a lot of times is exactly what they don't care for. Nachmani's information is pretty good, because she makes lunches every day for about 74,000 students. Well, she doesn't exactly make the lunches, but she is coordinator of dietetic services for the School District of Philadelphia's Food Service Division.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Creative Educational Concepts Charter School, which served 110 students in grades kindergarten to sixth, became the first such school in the state to have its charter revoked when the Chester Upland Board of Control took that action yesterday. In making the decision, the board asserted that the school had inadequate facilities and had not delivered the promised educational program. The charter school had proposed an innovative curriculum built around computer-aided individualized instruction.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | By Dwight Ott and Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The school board yesterday decided to find out the cost of installing metal detectors in middle and high schools after meeting with a group of principals, who expressed concerns about safety in the city's public schools. A recommendation will be considered at Monday's regular board meeting, officials said yesterday. "We're at the point where we need to explore metal detectors," said Camden School Superintendent Roy J. Dawson, following the special meeting attended by six board members and seven middle and high school principals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Starting Saturday, middle and high school students in Pennsylvania can be criminally charged for hazing their peers, as new state regulations go into effect following several high-profile incidents at local schools. The state's anti-hazing law had applied only to college students, but in May, Gov. Wolf signed a bill extending its penalties to seventh through 12th graders. The changes kick in just in time for the start of the 2016-17 school year, and about five months after Chester County officials revealed a culture of hazing at Conestoga High School in the Tredyffrin/Easttown School District.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds of anxious parents packed the auditorium as their children lined hallways and swarmed around teachers in classrooms, clutching sheet music and instruments. The mission: Excel at a Saturday morning audition, wowing teachers to be selected for the hypercompetitive Girard Academic Music Program, one of the city's few magnet schools at the middle-school level and the only one specializing in music. The South Philadelphia middle and high school also has a strong academic curriculum and always attracts many more applicants than it can accept.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of anxious parents packed the auditorium as their kids lined hallways and swarmed around teachers in classrooms, clutching sheet music and instruments. The mission: excel at a Saturday morning audition, wowing teachers to be selected into the hypercompetitive Girard Academic Music Program, one of the city's few magnet schools at the middle school level and the only one specializing in music. The South Philadelphia middle and high school also has a strong academic curriculum, and always attracts many more applicants than it can accept.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cherry Hill Board of Education will vote Monday night whether to ratify a tentative two-year contract agreement with district professional and support staff that increases instructional time for middle and high school students by a half-hour a day and increases elementary teachers' time in school by the same amount. Members of the 1,070-member Cherry Hill Education Association approved the contract Thursday by a sizable majority, said union president Martin Sharofsky. The increase in middle and high school instruction time, which will be added to the beginning of the school day starting next fall, amounts to about 14 additional days, the district said in a statement.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Regina Medina and Daily News Staff Writer
TWO CANDIDATES vying to be the school district's next superintendent come from different backgrounds. One is a Latino immigrant, who has worked in the Midwest and West, with a penchant for crunching numbers. The other is African-American, with degrees in educational leadership, whose jobs have taken him to the South and the Mid-Atlantic. Both men, Pedro Martinez, 42, and William R. Hite Jr. , 50, will be in Philadelphia this week for public forums at district headquarters.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Without ever cracking a book, students in Bucks County's Pennsbury School District are learning a new subject this year: marketing. Starting three weeks ago, the 16 elementary, middle, and high schools are being adorned with - some say defiled by - advertisements as large as 5 by 10 feet. By month's end, 47 should be in place. Ultimately, 218 are to appear on walls and floors, and shrink-wrapped over lockers, locker-room benches, even cafeteria tables. In what administrators say is a first in the Philadelphia area and probably the state, the Pennsbury school board signed a contract with a national advertising agency that could boost the district's battered budget by as much as $424,000, while giving the firm's clients access to the habitat of 10,950 children, tweens, and teens.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cheers started, then swelled, as Casey Caruso, wearing a broad-brim hat festooned with small, dangling fruit replicas, grabbed a mike in the cafeteria at Great Valley Middle School. "The veggie ladies are back," she told her lunchtime audience of 360 sixth graders. As Caruso and her partner, Trudy Skibbe, walked between tables, eager hands reached out to grab the treats they were serving: slices of butternut-squash pizza, cooked with onions, rosemary and olive oil, and topped with mozzarella and Parmesan cheese.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Robert Maranto
Philadelphia's public charter schools have been under fire lately. First were revelations last spring that two of the city's 60 charter operators paid themselves outlandish salaries. More recently, the Philadelphia School District released a report claiming that charters cost the district $105 million annually. The writing is on the wall: The Philadelphia School District has declared war on charter schools. That's a shame, because the evidence shows that charters are the only public schools without selective admissions policies that can teach hard-to-reach urban adolescents.
NEWS
December 17, 2006 | By Matt Sandy FOR THE INQUIRER
The staying power of 12- to 18-year-olds often eclipses their spending power, leading to charges of loitering. To combat this issue, Mayor Tom Grady and Narberth Borough have unveiled Gnarbucks (or gNarbucks, depending on whom you ask), a coffeehouse for middle and high school students. Housed in the Narberth Community Theatre building at the United Methodist Church of Narberth, Gnarbucks held its inaugural gatherings Dec. 1 for middle schoolers and Dec. 2 for high schoolers.
NEWS
October 8, 2002 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seventh grader Jasmine Russell admired her teacher last year - the way he yelled "Code 9" to bring the class to a standstill, the way he talked about the importance of knowing one's culture, the way he wrote on the blackboard. Now, she wants to be a teacher just like him, and she might get a chance to before the year is out. The Beeber Middle School student is enrolled in a new program that offers students a taste of the teaching profession. The program will culminate with a chance for students to design their own lessons and deliver them to younger students.
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