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NEWS
January 7, 2013
More arms is the answer National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre's statement that, "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," unpalatable as it might be, is nothing but the truth. If the tragically gallant staff at Sandy Hook Elementary School had been armed and skilled in the use of a firearm, instead of only being able to offer themselves as human shields, or charge, unarmed, at the gunman, many of the first-graders and staff might have been saved.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Jessica Parks and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Whether they're up on the details of the fiscal cliff or not, people in the Philadelphia area on Sunday knew this: They were bugged at lawmakers for not working together to fix the problem. "It's a bunch of crap," Jim Waters, 48, of Lindenwold, said. "These people are supposed to be working for us. That's not what's happening. " Waters was among a throng of shoppers Sunday at the Cherry Hill Mall. As lawmakers in Washington tried and failed Sunday to solve the crisis and despite fear of an economic free fall should the impasse continue, the mall parking lot was full, and many stores had lines at the registers.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
By Joshua Henne Over 13 years in the NFL, Jon Runyan's job was to protect the quarterback. Now that he's in the House of Representatives, his job is to protect his constituents. Runyan (R., N.J.) can do that by agreeing to President Obama's plan to preserve Bush-era tax rates for the middle class while letting them expire for the richest 2 percent. Democrats and Republicans alike can agree that middle-income families' taxes shouldn't go up. But they will increase if Congress fails to act. With a Dec. 31 expiration date looming, Runyan would be wise to heed the advice of his colleague Tom Cole, the first Republican congressman to openly urge approval of Obama's plan.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - Sen. Barbara Buono (D., Middlesex), the first prominent Democrat to enter New Jersey's 2013 governor's race, offers obvious contrasts to the Republican governor she wants to challenge in November. "New Jersey is hurting," Buono said Friday, three days after she announced in an e-mail she would seek to challenge Gov. Christie, whose popularity and job approval numbers hit record highs after Hurricane Sandy hit the state in late October. Buono, 59, who has earned credibility with progressives for supporting gay marriage and won points with public-sector unions by arguing that changes to health-care plans should be collectively bargained rather than legislated, seems eager to point out differences with Christie and uninterested in parsing phrases.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Over the long run, the most important impact of an election is not on the winning party, but on the loser. Winners feel confirmed in staying the course they're on. Losing parties - those intent on winning again someday - are moved to figure out what they did wrong and how they must change. The conservative movement and the Republican Party it controls were stunned by President Obama's victory last month. The depth of their astonishment was itself a sign of how much they misunderstood the country they proposed to lead.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie and Democrats may be putting aside partisanship in Washington to fight for federal money to rebuild the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy. But back in Trenton, the Republican governor and the Democratic Legislature have used the storm to resurrect arguments and shove them in each other's faces. All in the name of bipartisanship. On Tuesday, Assembly leaders announced a $20 million package of job-creation bills, some of which Christie previously vetoed.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PRESIDENT OBAMA, during a visit to Montgomery County on Friday, argued that allowing taxes to rise for the middle class would amount to a "lump of coal" for Christmas, while in Washington, Republican House Speaker John Boehner declared that negotiations to surmount a looming fiscal cliff are going "almost nowhere. " Obama took his case to an audience in Hatfield, saying that a middle-class tax increase would present a "Scrooge Christmas" for millions of wage-earners. Speaking at a toy factory, Obama said Republicans should extend existing Bush-era tax rates for households earning $250,000 or less and allow increases to kick in for the more well-off.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama , at the K'Nex toy factory in Hatfield, and House Republican leader John Boehner , in Washington, said Friday they were far from agreeing how to boost taxes, cut spending, or prevent more extreme fiscal cliff government cuts and tax hikes. Less spending? More taxes? Those will slow the U.S. economy, not speed it up. Is this all we have to hope for from Washington next year? "Victory for the middle class is more jobs and higher wages," writes veteran stock-watcher James M. Meyer , of $1 billion-asset Tower Bridge Advisors , West Conshohocken, in a report for clients of Boenning & Scattergood . Too bad, he writes of the fiscal cliff debate, that "there is absolutely nothing that will come out of this" to help the middle class.
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